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OT: Dgdss Can/Am Differences

OT: Dgdss Can/Am Differences

Old Jun 17th 2001, 8:58 pm
  #1  
Concierge
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I read your response to the lady from Brazil about the differences between Can/Am being neglible.

I want to hear you say that after six months of living here ;-) My hubby, as well as so many other Canadians now living in the States, will attest that the differences are far greater than they every anticipated. So much so, that many Canadians would love to return home if only their spouses would or could join them there.

After three years, Jim is hating living in the States more and more and is just plain disgusted at times with the lack of caring of so many of the citizens of our area. He can't understand how we can be so unconcerned about things that go on around us. He dislikes our healthcare system, etc. There are things he likes, i.e. election of judges, job opportunities, etc.

Rita
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Old Jun 17th 2001, 9:49 pm
  #2  
Meagan Jaynes
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I disagree. I've been here for 2.5 years less a few months in between visits and
going home to get my visa. I absolutely love it here. I'm from Saskatchewan and now
in NC. I love the weather here and the southern hospitality is nice. I don't want to
go back to Canada. Maybe its the winters we had in Sask. -40 weather isn't pleasant
and either is going to work when its dark and coming home when its dark(My igloo was
damn cold too :P). Sure, I miss my family and friends, but they are just a plane
ticket away. I also don't like many of the socialistic views of Canada, but there is
no need to go into politics here. Honeslty though, I don't notice a whole lot of
difference from day to day, well except for little things like the people around me
all have southern accents. I am very happy living here and can't wait until the day I
can call myself a citizen.

Meagan

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Old Jun 17th 2001, 9:52 pm
  #3  
dgdss
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I know there are tons of differences, but I think that the differences between say
Brazil and the US would be far greater. After all my native tongue is English and our
cultures are basically the same. I find the greatest differences in food and like you
said health care, gun control etc. I feel much safer in Canada than I do in Raleigh,
but hey the weathers alot better and so is the Golf Hopefully I will enjoy it more
than your hubby.

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Old Jun 17th 2001, 10:08 pm
  #4  
Diane M
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Eddie is learning as much as he can about America, and is dismayed at many things,
such as the lack of protection for most employees, the level of violence, and the
level of bureaucracy. Fortunately, I live in a small town, and people are pretty
friendly, so he has felt very comfortable here when he has visited (3 times now, for
a week each). I think if I lived where I used to live, in a large, impersonal city,
it would be different. He is really excited about moving here... I hope he adapts
better than Jim is. There are differences between Canada and the U.S., although they
are more subtle than the differences between, say, China, or Africa and our country.
I hope Jim is able to find some more positive things about the U.S. to build toward a
happier attitude.

Diane M.

Rete wrote:
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Old Jun 17th 2001, 10:19 pm
  #5  
Peter
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Meagan,

Saw your post here and I am wondering what part of Saskatchewan you are from? I am in
Saskatoon and will be moving to Pennsylvania in the fall. Nice to see another
flatlander

Peter

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[usenetquote2]> > I read your response to the lady from Brazil about the differences between Can/Am[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > being neglible.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > I want to hear you say that after six months of living here My hubby, as well[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > as so many other Canadians now living in the States, will attest that the[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > differences are far greater than they every anticipated. So much so, that many[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Canadians would love to return home if only their spouses would or could join[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > them there.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > After three years, Jim is hating living in the States more and more and is just[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > plain disgusted at times with the lack of caring of so many of the citizens of[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > our area. He can't understand how we can be so unconcerned about things that go[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > on around us. He dislikes our healthcare system, etc. There are things he likes,[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > i.e. election of judges, job opportunities, etc.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Rita[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > --[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > --[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Rete and Jim (Can/Am Alumni '98)[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > The K1 FAQ http://www.k1faq.com The Mysterious Sealed Brown Envelope[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > http://www.k1faq.com/faq_index.htm Update AOS Experiences at:[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > http://www.kamya.com/interview/intro.html Update POE Experiences at:[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > http://www.k1poelist.com/ Update AOS filing: http://www.kamya.com/aos/[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > I-130/I-485 Helpsite at:[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > http://www.mindspring.com/~docsteen/...o/visainfo.htm[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Congress/2806/ AOS filing; Interview and K-1[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Interview Experiences: http://www.kamya.com/interview/intro.html[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
 
Old Jun 17th 2001, 10:43 pm
  #6  
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LOL will he or won't he find happiness in the US? That is the question.

Personally, he is overburdened at the moment with many worries economically here and in Canada. With the Can/Gov breathing down his neck re taxes owed on support payments (which according to his accountant should be tax exempt but according to Can/Gov isn't but the original amount due as triple), tenants that are behind in rent, etc., he doesn't find much to smile about these days.

But he misses getting burgers with everything (pickles, mustard, ketchup, etc.), white vinegar for his fries (only malt vinegar available here), people that look you in the eye when you walk pass and smile and say good morning or good day, having his own home with three bedrooms and a full basement and a backyard, socialized medicine, wal-mart and denny's, tim horton's, and good canadian chinese food.

He gave up a lot to be here in the States with me since I can't migrate to Canada. So once he becomes a USC and I retire (9 years from now), we will do the Canadian snowbird thingee. Until then he has his Nat'l Guard duties which he loves, he builds and sells his computers online, and personally, I think he enjoys bitching and moaning ;-)))

Rita

PS he loves the south, namely Virginia and Alabama.
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Old Jun 18th 2001, 1:39 am
  #7  
Hilary Whalen
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Guess he hasn't experienced the Canadian healthcare system in a while.........

H

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Old Jun 18th 2001, 2:06 am
  #8  
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LOL No, he hasn't. And he refuses to believe that it is in such dire straits as reported in the papers.

Rita
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Old Jun 18th 2001, 9:21 pm
  #9  
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I am British...I first visited America when I was just coming up to 23 years old (a little over 8 years ago). I thought at the time that it couldn't be too different from England, after all we're both industrialised western nations, both speak the same language, etc... BOY!! Was I ever wrong? It was so different it made my head spin! Even little things like lining up at Burger King were different. In England, we wait til we get to the counter, make our order, and stand in that spot until our food is given to us. At the Burger King I went to in VA, you lined up, made your order, were given a receipt, moved on down the counter, where someone called out the number on your receipt and handed you your food. I remember being about 4 people from the end of the line, and thinking to myself, "oh shit! I don't know what to do" Haha So I just watched what everyone else was doing. And this was everyday..something else different...it was a hell of an adjustment to make, but I had a blast. I've been 10 times now over the years (4 times this year already - for obvious reasons!), so I'm a lot more used to things. Especially since me and my sweetie got engaged, Texas is starting to feel more like home than England does. Everytime I get on the plane to go back it feels more and more like "leaving home". I know when I finally get that K1 visa in my passport, and the rest of my life begins, there'll be a whole lot more adjusting to do. I'm just happy that I've met someone I love enough to make moving to another country for the rest of my life seem like no big deal!
-Harry
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Old Jun 18th 2001, 9:23 pm
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p.s. And another thing I learned...we definately do NOT speak the same language! Not the accent so much as so many words and expressions being different. That was probably the hardest bit to get used to.
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Old Jun 18th 2001, 11:08 pm
  #11  
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Rita, just curious as to where you might live, because where I live, everyone
looks you in the eye and smiles and says hello, strangers start conversations
with you in line at the grocery store. (As I matter of fact, a few months after I
moved into my apartment, my car was whacked in the street by a hit-and-run driver
in the middle of the night. My next door neighbor, who I'd said "hi" to all of
maybe two times, was awake. She took the time to call the police and give them a
full report, because she hated to wake me before morning. Now THAT'S friendly.)
Most people here have big houses with basements and yards, there is a wal-mart
and a k-mart and a sam's club and a denny's, dozens of places where you can get
burgers with everything, and lots of Chinese food. I don't live in a rural area,
and I don't live in the south. If he's moved from a smaller city to a big one,
perhaps the difference is more that than a national one? Not sure, but all the
things you mention would be hard for ME to adjust to! LOL (and as for socialized
medicine, if it involves year long waits for heart bypass surgery like it does in
England.......

I know it's a big adjustment, and I know there are differences, but as someone
else pointed out, there are huge differences within the country as well, and
I'll bet someone from rural Alabama would have a helluva time adjusting to New
York City.

Beth
 
Old Jun 18th 2001, 11:12 pm
  #12  
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Too true. After over 2 and a half years, Shawn (from England) will STILL say
things that make no sense to me! I must say I've picked up a few English words
and phrases along the way; can't be helped.

Beth
 
Old Jun 19th 2001, 1:13 am
  #13  
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LOL and that is exactly where we live. 25 miles north of New York City. He is not a small town guy having been borne in Montreal, lived in that general area until age 17 and then the next 36 years in the RCAF, living in and around all of Canada from Cold Lake to Greenwood and in Germany for 16 years.

We, New Yorkers, tend to be intent on getting where we are going without interruption. Most of us live our lives without socially connecting with our immediate neighbors. For example, I've lived in my apartment since 1976 and when my daughters were young, I knew my neighbors only because the girls went to school with the other children in the building. But as they grew and those neighbors moved, I found that I didn't know 90 percent of the people who lived here. And, frankly, I liked it that way. I've changed some and now exchange pleasantries with fellow train riders and my neighbors but still tend to hold myself separate from them. I enjoy the solitude of the trip home on the train without having to converse with someone. It is my downtime and helps me make that transition from work mode to wife mode ;-)

Jim, on the other hands, knows our neighbors by name. He chats with anyone and everyone. There is no Denny's up our way and to find one we have to go to Roosevelt Field in Long Island which is about a 25 minute or more ride for us. Our neighborhood is old world Italian, quicking turning new world Irish and only red wine vinegar or malt vinegar is available in our neighborhood restaurants. Burgers are only served with or without cheese and if you want mustard and onions and pickles you have to ask for it.

We have lots of Chinese restaurants and have sampled here in our city and in New York City as well. Jim, however, claimed it was not the same as Canadian Chinese and he was correct as I sampled some when in Canada this May to celebrate his 60th birthday at the Ottawa Tulip Festival.

And about Alabama, Jim has been there several times to visit an internet friend and was offered a job at the University of Alabama (couldn't take it because he did not qualify for an H-1B) and he says people there are friendly and the social and he would not mind living there at all.

So the poor man will just have to muddle through the next 9 years in NYC cause this New Yorker is not welcome to emigrate to Canada. With my past bout with cancer, lack of bi-lingual skills and being past family rearing age, the Canadian government would turn me down, even being married to a Canadian. The only way I can go there is as a visitor for 6 months at a time.

Rita
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Old Jun 19th 2001, 2:10 am
  #14  
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I've been to Toronto, which is much more "European" than American cities.
Wouldn't say it's friendly so much as people aren't in fast forward like
in New York.

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I've dealt with New Yorkers a lot (having once worked for a telephone banking
center with mainly New York City branches) and I've found their brand of
friendliness has to be looked for. They will (on average) be abrupt to the point
of what I would have previously called rudeness, then cheerfully tell you "you
were wonderful, have a lovely day" all in one breath as they hang up the phone!
And here I thought they were mad at me! Then when Shawn was here on his very
first visit, we met in New York. We were down in the village and parked
unwittingly at a meter which was blocked off for a parade later that day. Got out
of the car and a small group of "natives" yelled "Hey lady, you can't park there!
You'll be towed!!" Again, they sounded rude, but it was a classic case of New
York "friendliness" in action; they really did have our best interests at heart,
in their own New York way.

Ever been to London, by the way? Makes New York look like the slow lane
(especially if it's raining) and someone will sit next to you, practically in
your lap, on an overcrowded tube car and be very careful to never have to say
"hi". I think it's because there are so many people in such a small place; if
they said hi to everyone, they'd never get where they were going!
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I'll agree that Toronto's Chinatown beats any Chinese food I've had here in the
states hands down. Not a bad Italian section either! Lots of recent Chinese (or
rather Hong Kong) immigrants in China; when Hong Kong was reverting to Chinese
rule, lots fled to Canada.
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And we thought American immigration policy was tough!!
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Here's hoping Jim learns to find the hidden niceness in those "Noo Yawkas". LOL

Beth
 
Old Jun 19th 2001, 11:47 pm
  #15  
t
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I can't wait to get back to Saskatchewan personally.. I miss the winters.. Even the
40 below...C or F.. Oh well .. Each to their own.. Although.. born Canadian raised
Canadian and will Die Canadian..

tim.....
 

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