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Many questions... few answers

Many questions... few answers

Old Dec 21st 2001, 2:23 am
  #1  
Matt Sealey
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Basically I'm a guy trying to move to the US. Funny, for a US Immigration
newsgroup

So far every avenue I've tried has been blocked by a huge lack of information: I see
websites everywhere but they are all geared up for people who aren't me -
30-something graduates with a great deal of experience in whatever field transferring
from a company with a US subsidiary.

I work with computers for a living.. I guess I'd be applicable for an H1-B if I
had a degree or I was 12 years older, but I'm not - I didn't go to University, I'm
22 and just have 4 years work experience doing mainly embedded systems programming
and support. But I don't need to work with computers.. in fact I'd quite like it
if I could get out of this topsy turvy industry and into something more mundane
and officey.

Is there any way I could get to the US, get a job and get ANY kind of work permit
there based on this? I don't care what I do, as long as I can somehow support myself
while I'm there. I have enough money to get me out there and live for a while but I
can't stay there and wait years for the immigration service to approve me.. and I
couldn't afford to get back if they didn't, and a deportation isn't something I want
tacked onto my passport..

My alternative is Canada, but I'm not too hot on the idea. They'd accept me in a
heartbeat if I could get a job offer (the Canadian embassy were more willing to give
information out than the US one..) but it's not where I want to be. Is there any
similar situation in US immigration? I mean, if I could get a job offer from a
company would that lower the requirements for the VISA (in that someone wants me
there, rather than I just want to be there..)

So.. any suggestions as to what I should do, who I should contact?

I'm really just looking for ideas and information.. I've been told before that I
should go pay a solicitor to start things off for me but there's the risk they'll
just tell me it's hopeless and charge me for the service: I don't want to waste money
telling me it's a waste of time.

Thanks in advance.

--
Matt
 
Old Dec 21st 2001, 2:31 am
  #2  
Stuart
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Not a hope ... the lack of degree and experience kills it dead. You need at least 3
years of experience to replace every year you don't have of the equivalent of an
american 4 year degree. In other words, you need at least 12 years experience.

I don't care what I do, as long as I
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Nope, can't do just anything ... you can only apply to do things that the INS and
Dept. of Labor believe you'll be qualified to do ... and they're permitted under the
visa you seek. And with your lack of education and experience, the answer in their
eyes is that you're only qualified to stay where you are.

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Given the coming change in rules in Canada, there's not a chance of getting in there
either. Without an Masters degree or at least a Bachelors degree coupled with
prearranged employment, you couldn't get enough points to meet the requirements.

Sadly, at the moment it's a waste of your time and money to consider either country.
The downturn in the world economy has only made things worse.

Stuart
 
Old Dec 21st 2001, 3:31 am
  #3  
Matt Sealey
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"Stuart" <[email protected]>

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[usenetquote2]> > Is there any way I could get to the US, get a job and get ANY kind of[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> > work permit there based on this?[/usenetquote2]

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I realise that..

[usenetquote2]> > for the immigration service to approve me.. and I couldn't afford to[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> > get back if they didn't, and a deportation isn't something I want[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> > tacked onto my passport..[/usenetquote2]

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I can apply myself to anything.. my qualifications (useless as they are) cover

a great deal really even though my limited work experience is computer-related.

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Hmm..

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[usenetquote2]> > My alternative is Canada, but I'm not too hot on the idea. They'd[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> > accept me in a heartbeat if I could get a job offer (the Canadian[/usenetquote2]

[usenetquote2]> > embassy were more willing to give information out than the US one..)[/usenetquote2]

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getting

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meet

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I was told that prearranged employment coupled with enough points for the

rest of it would get me in even in light of the changes.. the consulate

people said it WOULD hinge on securing a job which is the mitigating

factor - as long as your experience was in that field (and I have enough,

and the qualifications in line..)

But Canada is the wrong place by about 500 miles at the least.

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either

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I'm not moving for work-related reasons, but obviously you can't live without

money and a 3 month limited stay visa won't let you "stay" at all.

--

Matt
 
Old Dec 21st 2001, 3:59 am
  #4  
Andrew Miller
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Posts: n/a
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You may forget Canada - you won't get a validated job offer without a decent degree.
But even if you would somehow get such offer it would not compensate for the lack of
degree and you wouldn't qualify anyway for immigration visa.

--

../..

Andrew Miller Immigration Consultant Vancouver, British Columbia email:
[email protected] (delete REMOVE and INVALID from the above address before
sending email)
________________________________

"Matt Sealey" <[email protected]>
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[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > > Is there any way I could get to the US, get a job and get ANY kind of[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > > work permit there based on this?[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > Not a hope ... the lack of degree and experience kills it dead. You need[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > at least 3 years of experience to replace every year you don't have of the[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > equivalent of an american 4 year degree. In other words, you need at least[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > 12 years experience.[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > > for the immigration service to approve me.. and I couldn't afford to[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > > get back if they didn't, and a deportation isn't something I want[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > > tacked onto my passport..[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > Nope, can't do just anything ... you can only apply to do things that the[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > INS and Dept. of Labor believe you'll be qualified to do ...[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > permitted under the visa you seek. And with your lack of education and[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > experience, the answer in their eyes is that you're only qualified to stay[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > where you are.[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > > My alternative is Canada, but I'm not too hot on the idea. They'd[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > > accept me in a heartbeat if I could get a job offer (the Canadian[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > > embassy were more willing to give information out than the US one..)[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > Given the coming change in rules in Canada, there's not a chance of[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > in there either. Without an Masters degree or at least a Bachelors degree[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > coupled with prearranged employment, you couldn't get enough points to[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > the requirements.[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > Sadly, at the moment it's a waste of your time and money to consider[/usenetquote2]
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[usenetquote2]> > country. The downturn in the world economy has only made things worse.[/usenetquote2]
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Old Dec 21st 2001, 4:55 am
  #5  
David R . Tucker
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Posts: n/a
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What you want to do is to position yourself to qualify. Your youth makes that much
easier than it otherwise would be. The easiest way to do that for the US is to get at
least some university education. If you can get 2 years under your belt, and 2 more
years' full-time experience, you would qualify for an H-1B work permit, and possible
eventual sponsorship for permanent residence. But if you can afford it, by far the
best move from an immigration point of view, as well as the most lucrative no matter
where you work, is to get a 4-year university degree in something like computer
science. And it would help you immigrate to virtually any high-immigration country. I
doubt the opportunities in that field are dead forever (although I'm fresh out of
written guarantees). Of course, you could choose to go into a different field, if you
thought the immigration possibilities were comparable.

If you can afford it, it makes a lot of sense to attend a US university, even a less
competitive one, for two reasons. First, it's easier to find a US employer if you are
a) here and b) have a degree from an institution they've heard of. Second, although
it would be the height of folly to marry solely for immigration purposes, the fact is
it is easier to meet and fall in love with a US citizen if you happen to be in the
US. And if you you stick around here, nature will more likely than not take its
course eventually. Assuming you're still available, of course.

If that option doesn't appeal, you could look into some sort of exchange program.
But, to be honest, you'd really be best off, regardless of where you live, with
getting a 4-year degree. And if you hurry, you might be able to make application
deadlines for the fall.

Don't underestimate your youth as a resource; you can think strategically and make
choices that shape your life in the direction you want to go, if you know what that
direction is. Most of the rest of us have to live with the choices we've already made
and live within the constraints they imply. Plus, you have time on your side; you
don't need a magic bullet that will work immediately. All you need is a little
planning and some patience. And a bit of luck would come in handy, too.

--
David R. Tucker [email protected]

"I may be wrong, but I'm not Clearly Erroneous."

- Judge Hillman
 
Old Dec 21st 2001, 1:57 pm
  #6  
Stuart
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Posts: n/a
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Somebody really managed to bluff their way through those H1Bs

There are a few other options, but getting them costs a US employer a bundle for low
salaried workers. Anyway, I'm not sure I'd want to emigrate anywhere at the moment
given the high unemplyment and high risk of layoffs, which force you into moving back
home when you can least afford it, or end up overstaying, which in today's world is
also a big nono!

Stuart
 
Old Jan 1st 2002, 4:25 am
  #7  
Scott
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Posts: n/a
Default

Matty Boy,

You're barking up the wrong tree. At your age and with your skills you should be
thinking about building your own business in the UK or in the ex colonies who still
depend on that good old British sense of "get-it-done". Do a little homework and
check out the less populated ex colonies like the Bahamas, the British outer ilses,
the ex-African colonies, etc. If you're honestly skilled in your field, they could
use you. Here in North America, we're getting by fairely well.

Good Luck!

Matt Sealey wrote:

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Old Jan 1st 2002, 4:03 pm
  #8  
James Donovan
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Posts: n/a
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Stuart <[email protected]>
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > I've heard of some people getting employment on H-1B with their only[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > qualification being an MCSE and some work experience (a couple of years). But[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > then again Microsoft equates an MCSE with a University degree.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > Also I have heard some people getting employment on J visas (although it's not[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > really called "employment", more like training or apprenticeships) through[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> > exchange programs.[/usenetquote2]
[usenetquote2]> >[/usenetquote2]
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Yep in this case I'd have to agree, although many American'ts are so damn stupid,
that these MCSE H-1B's look like Albert Einstein in comparison..
 

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