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Job hunting in NYC

Job hunting in NYC

Old Aug 17th 2016, 6:57 pm
  #1  
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Default Job hunting in NYC

Hi guys!

I'm new here and hope I'm posting in the right area (I did double check).

I've recently moved just north of NYC (Hudson valley area), after getting married to the love of my life. I have a green card, drivers license and of course a metro card

I'm 30 and, back in the UK was employed in the media industry, working for the same company that took me on after graduation (so almost 10 years). As it was a marriage based visa I left work till I had authority to work from USCIS.

My problem is - since getting my green card, I've applied online for jobs all over the city and received almost total radio silence. I've even spent an entire morning crafting a resume specifically for positions, only to see the job get re-posted.

So I'm trying to work out what I'm doing wrong. I've tried re-writing my resume multiple times, reached out to recruiters on LinkedIn and still not found interest.

Could it be I'm living too far out of the city for selection, or job title? (I reported to a director in the UK with a managers job title, which I suspect in US terms would be a director/VP reporting to a C-level exec? - so it looks like I'm not as experienced/senior as the job post requires?).

Many thanks to any that can give some advice and/or have been in this situation too! It's heart breaking seeing jobs you know you can do, and not even getting an interview!
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Old Aug 17th 2016, 7:16 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

All I can say is that you are not alone. Even USCs experience the same silence you do.

Make sure your resume is all spelled correctly, with American spelling. Make sure any education is in American terminology. Make sure you don't highlight the fact that you have a green card or don't need visa sponsoring.

Rene
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Old Aug 17th 2016, 7:38 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

Originally Posted by livinginnyc View Post
Hi guys!

I'm new here and hope I'm posting in the right area (I did double check).

I've recently moved just north of NYC (Hudson valley area), after getting married to the love of my life. I have a green card, drivers license and of course a metro card

I'm 30 and, back in the UK was employed in the media industry, working for the same company that took me on after graduation (so almost 10 years). As it was a marriage based visa I left work till I had authority to work from USCIS.

My problem is - since getting my green card, I've applied online for jobs all over the city and received almost total radio silence. I've even spent an entire morning crafting a resume specifically for positions, only to see the job get re-posted.

So I'm trying to work out what I'm doing wrong. I've tried re-writing my resume multiple times, reached out to recruiters on LinkedIn and still not found interest.

Could it be I'm living too far out of the city for selection, or job title? (I reported to a director in the UK with a managers job title, which I suspect in US terms would be a director/VP reporting to a C-level exec? - so it looks like I'm not as experienced/senior as the job post requires?).

Many thanks to any that can give some advice and/or have been in this situation too! It's heart breaking seeing jobs you know you can do, and not even getting an interview!
Welcome to BE! You say you have a profile on LinkedIn, have you changed it to US spelling and punctuation? Just what do you mean by "the media industry?" Could you start with a local job, and work up to NYC?
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Old Aug 17th 2016, 8:07 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

Originally Posted by Noorah101 View Post
..... Make sure you don't highlight the fact that you have a green card or don't need visa sponsoring.
Noorah is correct - a slightest whiff of "visa issue" is likely to send potential employers running away! The fact that a green card means "unlimited rights to work in the US" (except where it is legal to specify that recruits must be a US citizen) is often misunderstood by native-born US citizens.
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Old Aug 17th 2016, 8:18 pm
  #5  
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

Hey guys, thanks for the tips so far!

I did re-write my resume with US terms & spellings - and then rewrote it away from the UK format (with a little help with some friends I've made here).

Re: mentioning green card.
Oh God, - I've put that in literally *every* cover letter I've sent. I thought it was important to point out I didn't require any future sponsorship or paperwork on their part.

Re: Working in media
Nutmegger, I worked in broadcast television. I appreciate it's a niche area, but I'm very lucky that NYC is a big media hub. I've have applied to the big companies (NBC is the ultimate dream) as well as local news, as you mentioned and reached out to facility companies too (that own production space, and rent it out). I've also expanded out of straight TV too, I've got transferable skills in say online and radio so have reached out there too!

So does mentioning Green Cards.etc set off big alarm bells?
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Old Aug 17th 2016, 8:34 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

Originally Posted by livinginnyc View Post
.... So does mentioning Green Cards.etc set off big alarm bells?
The law says you have almost entirely unrestricted rights to work in the US. Full stop. Period.

IMO there is no value in restating only what the law says to be true. Therefore even mentioning a green card may only cause uncertainty, and no good will come of it. ...... Mention it only if asked directly about your right to work in the US, and even then start off saying that you have "unrestricted rights to work in the US", and back that up with you have a green card as a result of marriage to a US citizen, and repeat, you are free to work and there is no support required from any employer. For good measure, you could tell them that you will be eligible for citizenship in 2019.

Last edited by Pulaski; Aug 17th 2016 at 8:51 pm.
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Old Aug 17th 2016, 8:43 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

This thread had some really good tips with a guy who eventually got a job.
http://britishexpats.com/forum/usa-5...unting-871760/
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Old Aug 17th 2016, 10:45 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

I would suggest you have your CV revamped by a professional into a job winning US resume. It is money well spent.

If you're in the Hudson Valley area, have you tried local networks (FIOS, Cablevision)? They do have their own programs. There is also HBO whose headquarters in New York I believe is on 42nd Street or just off of it. They have been shooting a new series with Jessica Sarah Parker here in Yonkers this late spring and early summer. Lots of independent film makers in the city as well.

You've had only one employer and while you have risen in the ranks, you really need to start networking. You can do that online first. Don't expect to get a job at the same level you once had but be willing to start lower on the totem pole.

There is a poster here on BE who is in media as well but he lives in Rochester. He's been interviewing for a position in DC recently.
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Old Aug 18th 2016, 12:41 am
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

I have to say, I disagree with the advice here (sorry chaps!). The OPs CV is probably like mine when I moved over; full of British jobs and a British education. That's a pretty strong indicator I'm a British national and new immigrant to the US. I'm not sure I put I'm an LPR on my CV, but I certainly make a external recruiter / internal HR recruiter aware so they can say I have authorisation to work in the US with any potential employer.

I review CVs most weeks, and I don't care if you're an LPR and applying. Personally I'd prefer an applicant to be permanent rather than on a temporary EAD.

As for Americanising a CV, god no. I personally couldn't do it. American English is such garbage. People here love nearly all things British. I've never had any issues talking to potential employers with my British English CV.
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Old Aug 18th 2016, 2:09 am
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

I have a friend who married an American and is a writer in Hollywood. The UK/US thing has absolutely NO bearing on TV employment!

The answer to the OP's question is legwork. I'm in the same boat, unemployed but with good experience. The way of the 2010's and forward is online application forms and 'job portals'. Unfortunately, it removes the human element and makes it much harder to even be seen, even though you may be much more ideal than the candidate they eventually employ!

Every listing I see says '169 people have applied for this position'. I don't remember the last one that was below 100!

Anyway, looks like I have a job offer. If all goes well, I start soon. It was ALL online.
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Old Aug 18th 2016, 3:14 am
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

I agree with hungryhorace. When hubby was job hunting last year, he put something at the end of his profile blurb llike 'UK citizen with US Permanent Residency (Green Card); able to freely live and work anywhere in the US'. The outplacement consultant (he'd been laid off on a helpful redundancy package) said it was a good idea, given his mostly UK/ European-based work history; he might otherwise look like a visa chancer.

Guindalf - fingers crossed the new role works out. That was pretty quick!
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Old Aug 18th 2016, 3:51 am
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

Originally Posted by Guindalf View Post
I have a friend who married an American and is a writer in Hollywood. The UK/US thing has absolutely NO bearing on TV employment!

The answer to the OP's question is legwork. I'm in the same boat, unemployed but with good experience. The way of the 2010's and forward is online application forms and 'job portals'. Unfortunately, it removes the human element and makes it much harder to even be seen, even though you may be much more ideal than the candidate they eventually employ!

Every listing I see says '169 people have applied for this position'. I don't remember the last one that was below 100!

Anyway, looks like I have a job offer. If all goes well, I start soon. It was ALL online.
Good luck Guindalf!
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Old Aug 18th 2016, 1:29 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

Originally Posted by hungryhorace View Post
I have to say, I disagree with the advice here (sorry chaps!). The OPs CV is probably like mine when I moved over; full of British jobs and a British education. That's a pretty strong indicator I'm a British national and new immigrant to the US. I'm not sure I put I'm an LPR on my CV, but I certainly make a external recruiter / internal HR recruiter aware so they can say I have authorisation to work in the US with any potential employer.

I review CVs most weeks, and I don't care if you're an LPR and applying. Personally I'd prefer an applicant to be permanent rather than on a temporary EAD.

As for Americanising a CV, god no. I personally couldn't do it. American English is such garbage. People here love nearly all things British. I've never had any issues talking to potential employers with my British English CV.
So if you prefer a PR over an EAD then you discriminate on immigration status which is illegal.
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Old Aug 18th 2016, 2:19 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

Originally Posted by boltonreddave View Post
So if you prefer a PR over an EAD then you discriminate on immigration status which is illegal.
You need to wake up and enter reality. Discrimination happens in every walk of life, regardless of what the law says.

If I thought an employer would be completely fine investing in me with a temporary work permit, then I wouldn't feel the need to mention on job applications I've made that I am an LPR. In fact, many job applications ask how you are authorised to work in the US.

Those with the unrestricted right to permanently live and work in the country are always going to be preferable to those without. Firms when hiring are potentially looking to invest significant money and time training this hire, to have them leave because of an immigration issue down the line is a risk many won't take.

That's the reality, regardless of whether you like it or not.
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Old Aug 18th 2016, 8:51 pm
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Default Re: Job hunting in NYC

Originally Posted by boltonreddave View Post
So if you prefer a PR over an EAD then you discriminate on immigration status which is illegal.
Might be. Good luck proving it. It is a fact of life.

I'm with HH. Mention not needing sponsorship in a cover letter, but not on the CV. It is a double edged sword, but if your education and work experience is very obviously not in the US, it helps to make it clear you don't need sponsorship.

Then get networking. Go to media related networking events, conferences and meetup groups and get your name out there.
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