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Immunizations

Immunizations

Old May 23rd 2002, 4:10 am
  #1  
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Default Immunizations

Hi you all!!!
I just have my problems with the immunizations required for the K1, especially the chicken pox one. When I read through this forum, I found out that in the UK, for instance, the chicken pox immunization isn't required for the US and in other countries it is required. But all the countries are referring to the INS immunization rules (I mean the form where all the required immunizations are listed up). Why do the countries deal this immunization things so differntly? And how about the panel phyisicans: do they usually held back the medical report for the consulate until you get all the required immunizations or are you allowed to get a missing immunization then later in the US?
Are there any general rules how a panel physician/a consulate deals with such a situation?
I would appreciate to receive your answers.
Greetings and have a nice day.

TaKa
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Old May 23rd 2002, 10:58 am
  #2  
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Default Re: Immunizations

The reason they have different requirements for different countries is partly due to which diseases are endemic there, and the vaccinations that are licensed in those countries.

Coming from the UK, you DO NOT NEED VARICELLA! It's not licensed for prophylactic use by healthy people, so you can't have it.

The only vaccinations of interest to an adult are MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) and Td (tetanus, diptheria). You only need the MMR if you haven't previously had the vaccine (or any of its components) as a child or teenager, and you haven't had the diseases, or you can't document it. With Td, you get a booster in the UK every 10 years - if you are more than 10 years since your last one, then you need to get it; if it's less than ten years, you are covered.

For a K1 visa, you can leave your medical 'open', as long as you catch up on your vaccinations by the time you go for AOS. You are at risk, in this situation, of needing a lot more vaccinations once you get to the US. IMO, it is better to complete your vaccination requirements in the UK, as then you only need to get 2 at the most.
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Old May 23rd 2002, 3:20 pm
  #3  
Ranjini
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Default Re: Immunizations

They don't hold back the medical report. They can give you the missing immunizations
themselves, on the same day. For instance the MMR and DPT. I recall that some of the
shots I had to go back a second day to have them completed. If you donb't have time,
you could arrange to have them before your AOS here in the US. You have to remember
that these people are doctors and they have medical opinions. And basically, the way
I look at it I think immunizations are for your own protection. If you have never had
chicken pox (and the vaccine is available) it would be a good idea to get the
immunization as chicken pox can be pretty devastating to get when one is an adult. I
was happy to get
it. They don't give to you if you have already had it. Someone on the forum
mentioned that in the UK chicken pox immunizations are only to pregnant women
(??) and others they consider to be at risk.. So it's possible that the doctors
in the UK don't consider it important for an immigrant unless you happen to be
pregnant?? Maybe a forumer from the UK could clarify?? You don't go before a
panel of phsycians. You just go to one of the doctors on the list. It's a pretty
"painless" procedure. You only have to worry iunless they find that you have HIV
or tuberculosis or some other communicable disease. It's really no big deal.
Hope this helps, Ranjini

"TaKa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Hi you all!!! I just have my problems with the immunizations required for the K1,
    > especially the chicken pox one. When I read through this forum, I found out that in
    > the UK, for instance, the chicken pox immunization isn't required for the US and in
    > other countries it is required. But all the countries are referring to the INS
    > immunization rules (I mean the form where all the required immunizations are listed
    > up). Why do the countries deal this immunization things so differntly? And how
    > about the panel phyisicans: do they usually held back the medical report for the
    > consulate until you get all the required immunizations or are you allowed to get a
    > missing immunization then later in the US? Are there any general rules how a panel
    > physician/a consulate deals with such a situation? I would appreciate to receive
    > your answers. Greetings and have a nice day.
    >
    > TaKa
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old May 23rd 2002, 4:20 pm
  #4  
Ranjini
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Default Re: Immunizations

The impression I had when I was at the medical was that varicella was optional. The
doctor just recommended it. I recalled at the time, that the fiance of my niece
contracted chicken pox just a month before the wedding. The bride (my niece) took a
course of varicella vaccine and thankfully did not get it. This was the deciding
factor for me. What the doctor told her was that if she took the course, that even if
she had already contracted it would take a milder form. At the time, it was new on
the market and fairly expensive and I was basically thankful it was available. And
the immunization is for life. My decision to get it was as simple as that. The DPT
and MMR are given for the same reason.Your own protection. You can't be carriers of
such diseases. Those too have nothing to do with them being "endemic". What
particular diseases do they usually vaccinate against that are endemic?? Just
curious. Ranjini

"Ameriscot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > The reason they have different requirements for different countries is partly due
    > to which diseases are endemic there, and the vaccinations that are licensed in
    > those countries.
    >
    > Coming from the UK, you DO NOT NEED VARICELLA! It's not licensed for prophylactic
    > use by healthy people, so you can't have it.
    >
    > The only vaccinations of interest to an adult are MMR (measles, mumps and rubella)
    > and Td (tetanus, diptheria). You only need the MMR if you haven't previously had
    > the vaccine (or any of its components) as a child or teenager, and you haven't had
    > the diseases, or you can't document it. With Td, you get a booster in the UK every
    > 10 years - if you are more than 10 years since your last one, then you need to get
    > it; if it's less than ten years, you are covered.
    >
    > For a K1 visa, you can leave your medical 'open', as long as you catch up on your
    > vaccinations by the time you go for AOS. You are at risk, in this situation, of
    > needing a lot more vaccinations once you get to the US. IMO, it is better to
    > complete your vaccination requirements in the UK, as then you only need to get 2 at
    > the most.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > http://www.ameriscot.com/i130
    >
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old May 23rd 2002, 4:20 pm
  #5  
Ranjini
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Immunizations

<<The reason they have different requirements for different countries is partly due
to which diseases are endemic there>>

Immunization is used to build anti-bodies within your OWN body to prevent YOU from
getting a certain disease, for instance measles. You are immunized against measles in
your home country to prevent you from getting measles when you get to the US or
before you leave your country or perhaps even enroute. Neither measles, mumps nor
rubella can be considered "endemic". Nor diphtheria or tetanus. Can you name these
endemic diseases you talk about or how you view immunization when you talk about
endemic diseases. I'm not a doctor but I can understand if you will explain this in
layman terms. Thanks, Ranjini

"Ameriscot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > The reason they have different requirements for different countries is partly due
    > to which diseases are endemic there, and the vaccinations that are licensed in
    > those countries.
    >
    > Coming from the UK, you DO NOT NEED VARICELLA! It's not licensed for prophylactic
    > use by healthy people, so you can't have it.
    >
    > The only vaccinations of interest to an adult are MMR (measles, mumps and rubella)
    > and Td (tetanus, diptheria). You only need the MMR if you haven't previously had
    > the vaccine (or any of its components) as a child or teenager, and you haven't had
    > the diseases, or you can't document it. With Td, you get a booster in the UK every
    > 10 years - if you are more than 10 years since your last one, then you need to get
    > it; if it's less than ten years, you are covered.
    >
    > For a K1 visa, you can leave your medical 'open', as long as you catch up on your
    > vaccinations by the time you go for AOS. You are at risk, in this situation, of
    > needing a lot more vaccinations once you get to the US. IMO, it is better to
    > complete your vaccination requirements in the UK, as then you only need to get 2 at
    > the most.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > http://www.ameriscot.com/i130
    >
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old May 23rd 2002, 5:20 pm
  #6  
Donna Maindraul
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Immunizations

In article <3c[email protected]>, Ameriscot
<[email protected]> wrote:

    > The reason they have different requirements for different countries is partly due
    > to which diseases are endemic there, and the vaccinations that are licensed in
    > those countries.

Nope. They aren't immunizing anyone against AIDS or malaria, or even tuberculosis.

The list is derived from the Centers for Disease Control recommendations for
children. In fact, they only hold an individual to what the CDC recommendations
that were in existence here when that person was a child; hence a child "must"
have Hepatitis B even though it's a sexually transmitted disease and children
aren't at risk.

In fact, many of the vaccines make no medical sense for a particular individual, for
a variety of reasons. Any American doctor, including the INS-approved ones, won't
give a vaccine that you don't need or want. It's actually illegal. But the foreign
ones doing K-1 exams might be in the habit of insisting on them, for all I know.

-Donna
 
Old May 23rd 2002, 6:23 pm
  #7  
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Joined: Mar 2001
Posts: 717
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Default Re: Immunizations

Originally posted by Donna Maindraul

The list is derived from the Centers for Disease Control recommendations for
children. In fact, they only hold an individual to what the CDC recommendations
that were in existence here when that person was a child; hence a child "must"
have Hepatitis B even though it's a sexually transmitted disease and children
aren't at risk.
The vaccinations that are required by the US consulate's panel physician in the UK are based on the UK Department of Health's recommendations, not the Centers for Disease Control. That's why you don't need to bother with Hep B and why you can't have the varicella vaccine.

The only routine vaccination for (young) adults in the UK is tetanus & diptheria, and that is indeed required by the panel physician. The MMR is a special case - it is only required if you somehow missed out on the diseases or vaccinations as a child. I suspect that as the children who currently receive this vaccination + booster as a child become adults, this jab will revert to one required only for U18s on the embassy list, along with DPT and polio.
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Old May 23rd 2002, 6:32 pm
  #8  
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Default Re: Immunizations

Originally posted by Ranjini
[B
Neither measles, mumps nor
rubella can be considered "endemic". Nor diphtheria or tetanus. [/B]
Perhaps I should have said "used to be endemic or common until the advent of mass vaccination". The diseases we vaccinate against have not yet been eradicated - smallpox is the only one, which is why we don't vaccinate against that any more.

Although vaccination protects the individual, it is also for the common good. For example, rubella is harmless to most people, yet we still vaccinate to protect those who would be at risk. And there are always going to be a percentage of the population who are immunocompromised that we also protect by mass vaccination.
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Old May 23rd 2002, 6:41 pm
  #9  
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Default Re: Immunizations

Originally posted by Ranjini
The impression I had when I was at the medical was that varicella was optional.
It may be an option in the country you are in/from, but it's not an option in the UK. It is simply not licensed for general prophylactic vaccination, and therefore not a requirement for an immigrant visa to the USA. It is only available on a named-patient basis for people who are at risk of becoming extremely sick from wild varicella. Those at risk of neonatal varicella are the group that springs to mind, or anyone with a family history of poor tolerance/bad side effects to varicella.
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Old May 23rd 2002, 9:20 pm
  #10  
Ranjini
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Default Re: Immunizations

<<Perhaps I should have said "used to be endemic or common until the advent of mass
vaccination".>> Thanks for qualifying your previous statement. With better health
care in most countries, the diseases we are vaccinated against are, thankfully, no
longer endemic. Ranjini

"Ameriscot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Ranjini wrote:
    > > [B Neither measles, mumps nor rubella can be considered "endemic". Nor
    > > diphtheria or tetanus.
    >
    >
    >
    > Perhaps I should have said "used to be endemic or common until the advent of mass
    > vaccination". The diseases we vaccinate against have not yet been eradicated -
    > smallpox is the only one, which is why we don't vaccinate against that any more.
    >
    > Although vaccination protects the individual, it is also for the common good. For
    > example, rubella is harmless to most people, yet we still vaccinate to protect
    > those who would be at risk. And there are always going to be a percentage of the
    > population who are immunocompromised that we also protect by mass vaccination.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > http://www.ameriscot.com/i130
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > http://www.ameriscot.com/i130
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Jeanie
    >
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old May 23rd 2002, 10:20 pm
  #11  
Donna Maindraul
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Immunizations

In article <[email protected]>, Ameriscot
<[email protected]> wrote:

    > Donna Maindraul wrote:
    > > The list is derived from the Centers for Disease Control recommendations for
    > > children. In fact, they only hold an individual to what the CDC recommendations
    > > that were in existence here when that person was a child; hence a child "must"
    > > have Hepatitis B even though it's a sexually transmitted disease and children
    > > aren't at risk.
    >
    >
    >
    > The vaccinations that are required by the US consulate's panel physician in the UK
    > are based on the UK Department of Health's recommendations, not the Centers for
    > Disease Control. That's why you don't need to bother with Hep B and why you can't
    > have the varicella vaccine.
    >
    > The only routine vaccination for (young) adults in the UK is tetanus & diptheria,
    > and that is indeed required by the panel physician. The MMR is a special case -
    > it is only required if you somehow missed out on the diseases or vaccinations as
    > a child.

The information on vaccinations recommended in the UK is interesting, but the point
of the discussion here is the relationship between vaccination and immigration to the
US. Thus the policies are set by the US centers for Disease Control. The UK physician
can't give a vaccine that he can't purchase there, however.

The general idea is to give an immigrant the same vaccines that a native born
American of the same age would have. Theoretically most children born in the past
10 years have received Hepatitis B vaccine (mine certainly haven't!), so that one
is "required" for immigrant children. Most American adults have not had that
vaccine unless they are at risk for the disease, thus that one is not "required"
for adults. The reason it's on the INS list is that they've just copied the list
for children. You'll also see Haemophilus influenza b, varicella, etc., and
probably some of the folks a few years ago had that rotavirus vaccine that got
pulled for killing a few babies.

The US doctors, including the INS approved doctor that my husband saw in NYC, respect
current US policy regarding informed consent and privacy, rather than the rather
dated INS policies ("sealed envelope.") Thus, if you've had the disease, if a vaccine
is not age-appropriate (according to the CDC list and/or the actual prevalence of the
disease), or you have a religious objection, you won't be forced to have it against
your will.

-Donna
 
Old May 23rd 2002, 11:20 pm
  #12  
Ranjini
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Immunizations

<<The information on vaccinations recommended in the UK is interesting, but the
point of the discussion here is the relationship between vaccination and immigration
to the US.>>

I agree!!

<<The UK physician can't give a vaccine that he can't purchase there, however.>>

And that obviously answers the question about why varicella is not recommended
for immigrants to the US from the UK. But it does not under-value the importance
of having the varicella vaccine, if it is available. And if you have never
contracted chicken pox before. I wouldn't want to contract chicken pox anymore
than I would measles, mumps or any of the other stuff. Thanks for the valuable
input Donna. Ranjini

"Donna Maindrault" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Ameriscot
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Donna Maindraul wrote:
    > > > The list is derived from the Centers for Disease Control recommendations for
    > > > children. In fact, they only hold an individual to what the CDC
    > > > recommendations that were in existence here when that person was a child;
    > > > hence a child "must" have Hepatitis B even though it's a sexually transmitted
    > > > disease and children aren't at risk.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > The vaccinations that are required by the US consulate's panel physician in the
    > > UK are based on the UK Department of Health's recommendations, not the Centers
    > > for Disease Control. That's why you don't need to bother with Hep B and why you
    > > can't have the varicella vaccine.
    > >
    > > The only routine vaccination for (young) adults in the UK is tetanus & diptheria,
    > > and that is indeed required by the panel physician. The MMR is a special case -
    > > it is only required if you somehow missed out on the diseases or vaccinations as
    > > a child.
    >
    > The information on vaccinations recommended in the UK is interesting, but the point
    > of the discussion here is the relationship between vaccination and immigration to
    > the US. Thus the policies are set by the US centers for Disease Control. The UK
    > physician can't give a vaccine that he can't purchase there, however.
    >
    > The general idea is to give an immigrant the same vaccines that a native born
    > American of the same age would have. Theoretically most children born in the past
    > 10 years have received Hepatitis B vaccine (mine certainly haven't!), so that one
    > is "required" for immigrant children. Most American adults have not had that
    > vaccine unless they are at risk for the disease, thus that one is not "required"
    > for adults. The reason it's on the INS list is that they've just copied the list
    > for children. You'll also see Haemophilus influenza b, varicella, etc., and
    > probably some of the folks a few years ago had that rotavirus vaccine that got
    > pulled for killing a few babies.
    >
    > The US doctors, including the INS approved doctor that my husband saw in NYC,
    > respect current US policy regarding informed consent and privacy, rather than the
    > rather dated INS policies ("sealed envelope.") Thus, if you've had the disease, if
    > a vaccine is not age-appropriate (according to the CDC list and/or the actual
    > prevalence of the disease), or you have a religious objection, you won't be forced
    > to have it against your will.
    >
    > -Donna
 
Old May 24th 2002, 1:28 am
  #13  
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Default Re: Immunizations

Donna, very rational points, but not sure if that is actually the policy for the UK panel physician - he is able to prescribe the Hep B vaccine, but it's not required for the visa. It's only given to people with high risk behaviour or occupations in the UK - which is a lot of people. It is not a childhood vaccination in the UK, nor is there any public discussion of it.

But, yes, there is certainly a relationship between childhood vaccinations and INS requirements.

In the US, AFAIK, Hep B is a now required for children in 2nd Grade and lower (Ohio, for sure, but probably most states). Varicella is not yet a requirement, but is expected to be soon.
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Old May 24th 2002, 4:14 am
  #14  
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Default Re: Immunizations

Hi you all!!!

Thanks so much for your help and your answers.
I agree that the chickenpox immunization is useful and it is for your own advantage to have it (in order to prevent health problems). I just was wondering to hear that my fiance (he is 36) has never had a chickenpox immunization and never has had chickenpox at all. I assume that the immunization over in the US is just for kids and not for adults in this case.

Luckily I was able to talk to the Docs in Frankfurt yesterday. They told me they would already have given the medical report to the consulate. They said that I wouldn't be at a disadvantage towards the consulate because of the missing immunization. And that I would be able to get it optional once I would be over in the US. I was very glad to hear that, you can imagine.

Thanks for your help and have a good time.

Greetings from

TaKa
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Old May 24th 2002, 4:20 am
  #15  
Mrs_blackross
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Immunizations

an interesting tidbit about immunizations.. I found out at my kids medical
appointments last week that the varicella vaccine is supposed to be a required
vaccine; however, due to the shortage (at least here in MD), extra cost, and my son's
age (he's almost 9), the INS dr waived the requirement for my older child. (the
younger one had the chicken pox shot last fall as it was mandatory for entering
kindergarten). the kicker? my son came down with chicken pox three days ago. getting
him the shot wouldn't have done any good anyways, as he had already been exposed and
was already in the incubation period. LOL

"Ranjini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > <<The information on vaccinations recommended in the UK is interesting, but the
    > point of the discussion here is the relationship between vaccination and
    > immigration to the US.>>
    >
    > I agree!!
    >
    > <<The UK physician can't give a vaccine that he can't purchase there, however.>>
    >
    > And that obviously answers the question about why varicella is not recommended for
    > immigrants to the US from the UK. But it does not under-value the importance of
    > having the varicella vaccine, if it is available. And if you have never contracted
    > chicken pox before. I
wouldn't
    > want to contract chicken pox anymore than I would measles, mumps or any of the
    > other stuff. Thanks for the valuable input Donna. Ranjini
    >
    > "Donna Maindrault" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Ameriscot <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > > Donna Maindraul wrote:
    > > > > The list is derived from the Centers for Disease Control recommendations
    > > > > for children. In fact, they only hold an individual to what the
CDC
    > > > > recommendations that were in existence here when that person was a child;
    > > > > hence a child "must" have Hepatitis B even though it's a sexually
    > > > > transmitted disease and children aren't at risk.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > The vaccinations that are required by the US consulate's panel
physician
    > > > in the UK are based on the UK Department of Health's recommendations, not the
    > > > Centers for Disease Control. That's why you don't need to
bother
    > > > with Hep B and why you can't have the varicella vaccine.
    > > >
    > > > The only routine vaccination for (young) adults in the UK is tetanus &
    > > > diptheria, and that is indeed required by the panel physician. The MMR is a
    > > > special case - it is only required if you somehow missed out on
the
    > > > diseases or vaccinations as a child.
    > >
    > > The information on vaccinations recommended in the UK is interesting, but the
    > > point of the discussion here is the relationship between vaccination and
    > > immigration to the US. Thus the policies are set by the US centers for Disease
    > > Control. The UK physician can't give a vaccine that he can't purchase there,
    > > however.
    > >
    > > The general idea is to give an immigrant the same vaccines that a native born
    > > American of the same age would have. Theoretically most children born in the past
    > > 10 years have received Hepatitis B vaccine (mine certainly haven't!), so that one
    > > is "required" for immigrant children. Most American adults have not had that
    > > vaccine unless they are at risk for the disease, thus that one is not "required"
    > > for adults. The reason it's on the INS list is that they've just copied the list
    > > for children. You'll also see Haemophilus influenza b, varicella, etc., and
    > > probably some of the folks a few years ago had that rotavirus vaccine that got
    > > pulled for killing a few babies.
    > >
    > > The US doctors, including the INS approved doctor that my husband saw in NYC,
    > > respect current US policy regarding informed consent and privacy, rather than the
    > > rather dated INS policies ("sealed envelope.") Thus, if you've had the disease,
    > > if a vaccine is not age-appropriate (according to the CDC list and/or the actual
    > > prevalence of the disease), or you have a religious objection, you won't be
    > > forced to have it against your will.
    > >
    > > -Donna
 

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