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Hoping for US move

Hoping for US move

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Old Jun 17th 2018, 3:18 am
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Default Hoping for US move

Hello everyone, firstly, I apologize if this post is in the wrong section.
Basically I am a UK citizen and I graduated from a US college in 2016 and then completed OPT for 12 months. So, overall I spent 5 and a half years in the US on an F-1 visa.
I complete understand the options I have with visas and what not, and obviously marriage is an option. My question is, I spent 5 and a half years in the US and have a completely clean record and have a bachelors degree from a US college, does this give me no advantage at all to getting US citizenship/green card? I know I would need to find a company to sponsor me or I could do a masters program in the US but does there not come a time where someone can spend a certain amount of time in the US and have the ability to apply for citizenship or a green card? From what I know, I am no better off than someone who has never stepped foot in the US in their life. Is this true?

Any help would be great!
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Old Jun 17th 2018, 3:34 am
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

That is correct. Naturalization is only possible after first being a permanent resident (aka green card holder) for the prescribed amount of time. Becoming a green card holder is only possible if one is petitioned by a family member or a company. Note that work visas do not necessarily lead to green cards. It will depend on whether the company is prepared to sponsor you.

There are many people who have lived here for a number of years as visa holders with no direct path to a green card. Living here for x years does not make one a resident.
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Old Jun 17th 2018, 10:38 am
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

Originally Posted by Twinkle0927 View Post


There are many people who have lived here for a number of years as visa holders with no direct path to a green card. Living here for x years does not make one a resident.
It might be prudent to say 'does not make one a legal resident'!
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Old Jun 17th 2018, 2:29 pm
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

A US master's degree may help your success in a work visa. Any love interest in your time spent stateside?
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Old Jun 17th 2018, 4:31 pm
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

Yes, it is true. I'm mystified as to why you would think otherwise. Take your question and apply it to someone who wishes to live in the UK. Say that same person had attended university there, does the British government apply the time they spent in the UK against any immigration rules/laws/regulations that apply to those wanting to emigrate to the UK? It is doubtful. So I ask why you think that the US should accord someone who has attended school in the US special privileges just because they obtained a degree in the US? The time spent here cannot applied to immigration. It does accord the person the ability to go on to higher education and perhaps take advantage of OPT after graduation and with that, become noticed by a future employer who is will to sponsor them. You choose to get your Bachelor's Degree and leave the US without going on to a Master's Degree which would have given you the opportunity to participation in OPT.
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Old Jun 17th 2018, 9:48 pm
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

Originally Posted by Rete View Post
Yes, it is true. I'm mystified as to why you would think otherwise. Take your question and apply it to someone who wishes to live in the UK. Say that same person had attended university there, does the British government apply the time they spent in the UK against any immigration rules/laws/regulations that apply to those wanting to emigrate to the UK? It is doubtful. So I ask why you think that the US should accord someone who has attended school in the US special privileges just because they obtained a degree in the US? The time spent here cannot applied to immigration. It does accord the person the ability to go on to higher education and perhaps take advantage of OPT after graduation and with that, become noticed by a future employer who is will to sponsor them. You choose to get your Bachelor's Degree and leave the US without going on to a Master's Degree which would have given you the opportunity to participation in OPT.
Oh believe me, I did not think otherwise. Having spent plenty of time in the US, I understand how difficult it is to obtain a visa of any kind. Of course, I have done hours of searching to see the options for me to be in the US and, like I said, I understand how visas work and how difficult it is. My original post was simply to see if someone knew something that I had missed or any suggestions that I may not have discovered. I think people coming to the UK is a completely different story, I'm fully aware of the differences between UK and US immigration.
I know there are some nations that have a criteria relating to time attached to PR and citizenship and I was wondering if I had missed this information. As I said, I've done plenty of research and I am not surprised by the replies to my post!
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Old Jun 17th 2018, 11:32 pm
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

Masters may well help.
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Old Jun 18th 2018, 5:55 pm
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

Originally Posted by Rete View Post
Yes, it is true. I'm mystified as to why you would think otherwise. Take your question and apply it to someone who wishes to live in the UK. Say that same person had attended university there, does the British government apply the time they spent in the UK against any immigration rules/laws/regulations that apply to those wanting to emigrate to the UK? It is doubtful. So I ask why you think that the US should accord someone who has attended school in the US special privileges just because they obtained a degree in the US? The time spent here cannot applied to immigration. It does accord the person the ability to go on to higher education and perhaps take advantage of OPT after graduation and with that, become noticed by a future employer who is will to sponsor them. You choose to get your Bachelor's Degree and leave the US without going on to a Master's Degree which would have given you the opportunity to participation in OPT.
Actually, you can apply for indefinite leave to remain in the UK on the grounds of 'long residence." A cousin used the 10 years' residence one based on his lawful residence from A levels through bachelor's, masters and then work.
Then in Canada, I believe there are points given for studying at a Canadian university.
I'm not saying the US has to have similar rules as other countries, just that the OP's question is not all that mystifying.

Last edited by fbf2006; Jun 18th 2018 at 5:57 pm.
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Old Jun 18th 2018, 9:44 pm
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

Originally Posted by fbf2006 View Post
Actually, you can apply for indefinite leave to remain in the UK on the grounds of 'long residence." A cousin used the 10 years' residence one based on his lawful residence from A levels through bachelor's, masters and then work.
Then in Canada, I believe there are points given for studying at a Canadian university.
I'm not saying the US has to have similar rules as other countries, just that the OP's question is not all that mystifying.
However, the length of time spent in the UK on a student visa will, nowadays, NOT count towards how many years you have been resident in t he UK.
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Old Jun 21st 2018, 4:06 am
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Default Re: Hoping for US move

Originally Posted by fbf2006 View Post
Actually, you can apply for indefinite leave to remain in the UK on the grounds of 'long residence." A cousin used the 10 years' residence one based on his lawful residence from A levels through bachelor's, masters and then work.
Then in Canada, I believe there are points given for studying at a Canadian university.
I'm not saying the US has to have similar rules as other countries, just that the OP's question is not all that mystifying.
My daughter spent 5 years at a Canadian uni...afterwards she was allowed to stay and work for 3 years. During that time she applied for PR through her employer. If I remember correctly it has to be an accredited course and university...a 4 year course allows you to work for 3 years after graduation. Lesser number of years at uni...lessens the amount of time you can stay and work.
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