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Filing taxes

Filing taxes

Old Feb 21st 2011, 7:35 pm
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Default Filing taxes

Hi everyone,

As far as I'm aware my husband and I need to file a joint tax return this year (we were married 10/15/10). I read somewhere on here that it's important to ensure there's no misrepresentation on that tax return which could lead to the IRS thinking I'm a US citizen when I'm clearly not - is that easy to do? I wouldn't want to cause any trouble for myself!

I've never worked in the US and have no job lined up at the moment. I was just wondering if I should be filing a tax return in the UK as well? I did send the tax office in the UK a form (P-85 I believe) stating that I was no longer resident in the UK, and enclosed the documentation they asked for. I don't have savings or assets in the UK either, if that makes a difference.

Any advice would be appreciated!

RG
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Old Feb 21st 2011, 8:17 pm
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Default Re: Filing taxes

Originally Posted by randomgirl View Post
Hi everyone,

As far as I'm aware my husband and I need to file a joint tax return this year (we were married 10/15/10). I read somewhere on here that it's important to ensure there's no misrepresentation on that tax return which could lead to the IRS thinking I'm a US citizen when I'm clearly not - is that easy to do? I wouldn't want to cause any trouble for myself!
Huh? IRS returns do not in any way, shape or form indicate the citizenship of a person. They indicate residency only.

I've never worked in the US and have no job lined up at the moment. I was just wondering if I should be filing a tax return in the UK as well? I did send the tax office in the UK a form (P-85 I believe) stating that I was no longer resident in the UK, and enclosed the documentation they asked for. I don't have savings or assets in the UK either, if that makes a difference.

Any advice would be appreciated!

RG
Your husband needs to file as married -- either joint or separate -- preferrably joint since you have no income. Including you on his IRS tax return provides him with an additional deduction and lowers his tax liability.
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Old Feb 21st 2011, 8:24 pm
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Default Re: Filing taxes

Originally Posted by Rete View Post
Huh? IRS returns do not in any way, shape or form indicate the citizenship of a person. They indicate residency only.



Your husband needs to file as married -- either joint or separate -- preferrably joint since you have no income. Including you on his IRS tax return provides him with an additional deduction and lowers his tax liability.

Thanks for your reply, I think I must have got confused reading a different post!

He will file married, joint - thanks for clearing that up!
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Old Feb 21st 2011, 10:37 pm
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Default Re: Filing taxes

Hubby filed his taxes today, and it was his first time as a 'married, joint claim' thingy.

They needed to know my passport number, passport expiry/start dates and my ITN number..... which I had no idea what that was, but apparently its the 9 digit number allocated to you when your in the US for tax purposes

I received 3 Tax forms whilst studying there, and had trouble fishing the form up, but finally found it and could then give the ITN number to hubby, who then could file lol. Just to let you know though, if you have an ITN number its in the box which says 'social security number', this confused me no end, because I thought it meant i had a social security number, but they just put it in the same box

Last edited by britishspouse; Feb 21st 2011 at 10:49 pm.
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Old Feb 21st 2011, 10:38 pm
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Default Re: Filing taxes

An Independent Taxpayers Number is in lieu of a US social security number. Once you have received a ss number when you have emigrated to the US, he will use that instead.
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Old Feb 23rd 2011, 9:55 pm
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Default Re: Filing taxes

Not even that. My wife filed her first US tax return - jointly with me - before she's ever set foot in the USA.
Originally Posted by Rete View Post
Huh? IRS returns do not in any way, shape or form indicate the citizenship of a person. They indicate residency only.

Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN)
Originally Posted by Rete View Post
An Independent Taxpayers Number is in lieu of a US social security number.
Regards, JEff
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Old Feb 25th 2011, 3:27 am
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Default Re: Filing taxes

I've just filed my first tax return here in the US - a fairly simple process - I stumped up $50 or so for TurboTax (for federal and state taxes), spent an hour or so one night on the computer - all done.

We've been here since Nov 2010, wife not working yet. She didn't have a SSN or ITIN - we weren't too motivated to do so until Turbo Tax indicated a sizeable tax rebate was due (filed jointly... TurboTax suggested/checked we applied for all appropriate credits, rebates etc - nice!)

So Her in Doors went to the Social Security Office the next day - and a week later had her Social Security Card - how's that for speed!?

As others have already said, no citizen/residence stuff needed - just your SSN/ITIN and details of income, applicable costs etc from W2 and other docs...

Seems a little more 'together' than HMRC back home...

Cheers


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Old Feb 25th 2011, 1:13 pm
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Default Re: Filing taxes

Originally Posted by HarryTheSpider View Post
I've just filed my first tax return here in the US - a fairly simple process - I stumped up $50 or so for TurboTax (for federal and state taxes), spent an hour or so one night on the computer - all done.

We've been here since Nov 2010, wife not working yet. She didn't have a SSN or ITIN - we weren't too motivated to do so until Turbo Tax indicated a sizeable tax rebate was due (filed jointly... TurboTax suggested/checked we applied for all appropriate credits, rebates etc - nice!)

So Her in Doors went to the Social Security Office the next day - and a week later had her Social Security Card - how's that for speed!?

As others have already said, no citizen/residence stuff needed - just your SSN/ITIN and details of income, applicable costs etc from W2 and other docs...

Seems a little more 'together' than HMRC back home...

Cheers


Harry
Thanks Harry! Sounds a simple process. I already have my SSN so it shouldn't be complicated at all.
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Old Feb 25th 2011, 6:35 pm
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Default Re: Filing taxes

Since you guys seem to be enjoying it so much, want to do mine?
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