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Dual citizenship?

Dual citizenship?

Old Feb 12th 2009, 11:29 pm
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Isabel_7 View Post

It seems like a lot of money to me as well but I am going to pursue it nonetheless. The main reason being to safeguard my social security. I have paid into it for years and do not want to leave it behind if I do go back to UK for good. But one step at a time ...

Thanks for the Wiki pointers to those who put up that information.
One thing though, if you don't have enough contributions for a UK pension, you can use the US contributions as a top up, if you wanted only one pension. If you qualified for both on their own then this wouldn't be a good idea, just a thought.
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Old Feb 12th 2009, 11:31 pm
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Bob View Post
true, but then if moving away doesn't pan out as planned, could well find yourself in a pickle trying to get back...
Yep, agreed, that's a definate consideration for a lot of people, and the OP justified their reasoning too.
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Old Feb 14th 2009, 12:40 pm
  #18  
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

I was 43 when I came to the US, and I have a letter from the UK National Ins, telling me I have paid long enough to recieve at least 80% of my pension at retirement age. Oh and also I became a USC last September, and I still got to keep my "European Union" Passport!!
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Old Feb 14th 2009, 6:59 pm
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

I am 99% sure you do not need to become a USC to claim SS; I was an LPR for 20+ years and received an SS statement every year telling me what I was entitled to at retirement. I believe another poster had it right - there may be restrictions on your ability to claim it overseas if you are not a USC. Otherwise, it's yours regardless.

The citizenship application process is not $1,000 - it will cost you about $700 and - for me, in the past 6 months - took only 4 months from start to finish.

The key benefit of becoming a USC is that you can leave the country for an extended period of time; as an LPR, if you stay away >6months there can be consequences. Since you are considering retirement, you probably wouldn't want to come back and work anyway, but still - losing the LPR status could be a bummer. You can also vote ... and work for the post office ...

The key drawback of becoming a USC is that you become liable for income tax on your worldwide income. So if you leave the US, and strike it rich, you'd have to pay tax to US even if you never returned. Not likely to be an issue unless you struck it rich though! You are also eligible for jury duty.
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Old Feb 14th 2009, 11:47 pm
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

[QUOTE=Floridared;7284655]I was 43 when I came to the US, and I have a letter from the UK National Ins, telling me I have paid long enough to recieve at least 80% of my pension at retirement age. Oh and also I became a USC last September, and I still got to keep my "European Union" Passport!! [/QUOTE]

I lived in two other European countries for 8 years combined before coming here to the USA. I did not pay into the UK National Insurance for longer enough to become eligible for more than a very small sum paid out twice a year. But no complaints, plus I am already getting that sent into my US bank account without any problems.

Congrats on becoming a US citizen if that allows you more freedom in coming and going.
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Old Feb 14th 2009, 11:57 pm
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Steerpike View Post
I am 99% sure you do not need to become a USC to claim SS; I was an LPR for 20+ years and received an SS statement every year telling me what I was entitled to at retirement. I believe another poster had it right - there may be restrictions on your ability to claim it overseas if you are not a USC. Otherwise, it's yours regardless.

The citizenship application process is not $1,000 - it will cost you about $700 and - for me, in the past 6 months - took only 4 months from start to finish.

The key benefit of becoming a USC is that you can leave the country for an extended period of time; as an LPR, if you stay away >6months there can be consequences. Since you are considering retirement, you probably wouldn't want to come back and work anyway, but still - losing the LPR status could be a bummer. You can also vote ... and work for the post office ...

The key drawback of becoming a USC is that you become liable for income tax on your worldwide income. So if you leave the US, and strike it rich, you'd have to pay tax to US even if you never returned. Not likely to be an issue unless you struck it rich though! You are also eligible for jury duty.



I sent away for the forms etc to apply for naturalization but am still going to find out from Social Security whenever I can get through to a live person who can give me the information. I would like confirmation one way or the other about receiving SS if I leave the country. This would be the only reason I would pursue after all these years of living here USC.

Once I quit work I have not desire, even if I have a need, to work anywhere either here or there.

I do not have enough money to really be unduly concerned about paying American taxes if I leave the country, but on the other hand I do not want to pay anything if I am not living here either.

Much to think about ...
Thank you for taking the time to reply and offering this information.
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Old Feb 14th 2009, 11:59 pm
  #22  
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Sorry for the typos I have just come home from work and feeling tired. I should have proof read.
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Old Feb 15th 2009, 12:25 am
  #23  
 
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Isabel_7 View Post
[/B]

I sent away for the forms etc to apply for naturalization but am still going to find out from Social Security whenever I can get through to a live person who can give me the information. I would like confirmation one way or the other about receiving SS if I leave the country. This would be the only reason I would pursue after all these years of living here USC.

Once I quit work I have not desire, even if I have a need, to work anywhere either here or there.

I do not have enough money to really be unduly concerned about paying American taxes if I leave the country, but on the other hand I do not want to pay anything if I am not living here either.

Much to think about ...
Thank you for taking the time to reply and offering this information.
You can download the naturalization forms easily; get them all at uscis.gov

The SSA.gov site is better than the uscis.gov site; check it out for your questions:


If I leave the US, can I continue to receive benefits?

If you are not a United States citizen, the law requires us to stop your payments after you have been outside the United States for six consecutive calendar months unless you meet one of several exceptions in the law which will permit you to continue receiving benefits abroad. These exceptions are based, for the most part, on your citizenship.

I am a US citizen but plan to live overseas. Can I collect Social Security benefits in a foreign country?
Answer
If you are a U.S. citizen, you may receive your Social Security payments outside the U.S. as long as you are eligible for them. Regardless of your citizenship, there are certain countries where we are not allowed to send payments. For more information, please see Your Payments While You Are Outside The United States, Publication No. 05-10137, for a list of countries where we are not allowed to send payments.

If you are planning to be outside the United States for six consecutive calendar months or more, you can find out if you can receive your Social Security payment by using the Payments Abroad Screening Tool.


Your Basic Guide to Social Security Programs
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Old Feb 15th 2009, 12:46 am
  #24  
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Steerpike View Post
I am 99% sure you do not need to become a USC to claim SS; I was an LPR for 20+ years and received an SS statement every year telling me what I was entitled to at retirement. I believe another poster had it right - there may be restrictions on your ability to claim it overseas if you are not a USC. Otherwise, it's yours regardless. .
Hi:

You hit the nail on the head. A US Citizen can collect no matter where they live [however, I don't know how that would work in Cuba, but I digress]. An LPR has to remain an LPR to collect.
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Old Feb 15th 2009, 12:48 am
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

If you are a United States citizen, you can travel or live in most foreign countries without affecting your eligibility for Social Security benefits.

However, there are a few countries—Cambodia, Cuba, North Korea, Vietnam and many of the former U.S.S.R. republics (except Armenia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Russia)—where we cannot send Social Security payments.
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Old Feb 15th 2009, 1:30 am
  #26  
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Steerpike View Post
You can also vote ... and work for the post office ...
You can do that as an LPR though, and being an LPR for as long as the OP has, if they did strike it rich within 10 years they would still be liable.
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Old Feb 15th 2009, 7:30 am
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Bob View Post
You can do that as an LPR though, and being an LPR for as long as the OP has, if they did strike it rich within 10 years they would still be liable.
You can't vote as an LPR, silly

I presume you are referring to the 'work for the post office' part ... I was told by someone that you had to be a citizen for that; maybe I was wrong. I truly hope I'm never desperate enough to have to care!
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Old Feb 15th 2009, 7:32 am
  #28  
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Isabel_7 View Post
Sorry for the typos I have just come home from work and feeling tired. I should have proof read.
You can edit a post for up to two hours after posting; within those two hours, an 'edit' button will appear below your post, next to the 'quote' button.
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Old Feb 16th 2009, 2:21 am
  #29  
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Steerpike View Post
You can't vote as an LPR, silly

I presume you are referring to the 'work for the post office' part ... I was told by someone that you had to be a citizen for that; maybe I was wrong. I truly hope I'm never desperate enough to have to care!
the working for the post office, and yes, you can, they changed the requirement a few years ago and meeting my local posty, I don't blame you
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Old Feb 16th 2009, 4:39 am
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Default Re: Dual citizenship?

Originally Posted by Bob View Post
the working for the post office, and yes, you can, they changed the requirement a few years ago and meeting my local posty, I don't blame you
You are right ... On this page (USPS 'Employment Requirements') it says: "Citizenship
Employees must be a United States citizen, a lawful permanent resident alien (i.e., possession of a “green card”), a citizen of American Samoa or any other territory owing permanent allegiance to the United States. Individuals solely granted asylum status, refugee status or conditional permanent resident status are not eligible for Postal Service employment. "
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