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-   -   Dealing with aging parents in the UK (https://britishexpats.com/forum/usa-57/dealing-aging-parents-uk-645707/)

deborahb Dec 21st 2009 11:11 pm

Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
My 95 year old father-in-law is now alone. We would like to bring him to the US (we are citizens). Anyone have any advice on medical insurance? Can he purchase something in England to bring here or is he eligible for anything here (like Medicare)?

Ray Dec 21st 2009 11:22 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 

Originally Posted by deborahb (Post 8190349)
My 95 year old father-in-law is now alone. We would like to bring him to the US (we are citizens). Anyone have any advice on medical insurance? Can he purchase something in England to bring here or is he eligible for anything here (like Medicare)?

He is eligible for no help here and he will not get any insurance even travel insurance

The whole idea is just a non starter

deborahb Dec 21st 2009 11:25 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 

Originally Posted by Ray (Post 8190375)
He is eligible for no help here and he will not get any insurance even travel insurance

The whole idea is just a non starter

Well that's to the point. Thank you. I guess I was just hoping for a miracle - 'tis the season.

Bob Dec 21st 2009 11:59 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
unfortunately as Ray said, it's not likely to happen, you'll find it near impossible not to mention unaffordable to even get travel insurance for a few years....and insurance in the US, just not going to happen unless he fancies working till he's reached 100.

Just wouldn't be a goer, best bet would be moving to the UK to be with him if you want to be close.

im9907620 Dec 22nd 2009 11:59 am

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 

Originally Posted by deborahb (Post 8190349)
My 95 year old father-in-law is now alone. We would like to bring him to the US (we are citizens). Anyone have any advice on medical insurance? Can he purchase something in England to bring here or is he eligible for anything here (like Medicare)?

Yep, a non starter, but other things you might like to consider:

1. sheltered accommodation (or perhaps a "suitable" residential care home with some company and regular meals).
2. if not already done, your father really should think about giving someone appropriate a Lasting Power of Attorney in case of physical and or mental incapacity.

Gingerert Dec 22nd 2009 12:31 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
My 81-year old grandmother got medical insurance this summer, but she was only visiting for two weeks and the cost was astronomical. So yeah, if he wants to visit you, it can be done... but with a price tag.

Is it even wise to put him through all that upheaval?

Poppy girl Dec 22nd 2009 12:33 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
Play the lottery and pray for a million dollar + win. ;)

Rete Dec 22nd 2009 12:37 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 

Originally Posted by deborahb (Post 8190378)
Well that's to the point. Thank you. I guess I was just hoping for a miracle - 'tis the season.


Sorry, Deborah, but that is the hard and cold truth about the US. Your dad is not eligible for medicare and/or medicaid. Private insurance will not touch him at his age. If you have a few hundred thousand dollars in the reserve to use against medical care, then bring him here but if not, then he is far better off in the UK.

Is there some way that you can go back to the UK to spend his last remaining time with him? Even if it is only for 3 months and then home again for a month or two and then back to the UK?

deborahb Dec 22nd 2009 3:08 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
Thanks all for your thoughts. My husband is with his father now and we will go visit again soon. He's in great health - likely to live another 10 years! Happy Holidays.

Ray Dec 22nd 2009 3:49 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
My Mum is 88 and still going strong ...

My inheritance... I am in no rush for ...


I mean what can I do with 400+ pairs of shoes
and 600 bathroom towels

deborahb Dec 22nd 2009 3:54 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
I can relate here. My father-in-law's 98 year old girlfriend just passed on which is why my husband is there to clean up. Apparently she had a LOT of bars of soap. Also a rent controlled apartment in her name so he has to move. We are challenged...

Rete Dec 22nd 2009 4:11 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 

Originally Posted by deborahb (Post 8191759)
I can relate here. My father-in-law's 98 year old girlfriend just passed on which is why my husband is there to clean up. Apparently she had a LOT of bars of soap. Also a rent controlled apartment in her name so he has to move. We are challenged...


Why does he have to move. If he can prove he has lived in the apartment, then rent control allows him to stay in the apartment and assumes the lease.

At least that is the way of it in NYC.

DeanUK2US Dec 22nd 2009 4:11 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
Believe it or not, it's not a bad situation to be in. I've lost both my parents and would rather this 10x over... :(

deborahb Dec 22nd 2009 4:29 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
Surprisingly it is perhaps worse in England than NYC. Apparently he cannot take on the lease. I am actually surprised to hear that you can in NYC as well. I actually work in the area of property management software and in NYC you can't take over the lease unless you can prove that you have been paying for it. For this reason they often are extremely careful never to accept a check from someone not on the lease.

penguinsix Dec 22nd 2009 7:47 pm

Re: Dealing with aging parents in the UK
 
Hi,

One you thing you should note is that to bring him over you have to agree to 'sponsor' him for his needs. If he goes to hospital without insurance, then there is a sponsorship "contract" between you and him in which you agree to take on some of his liabilities.

Ouch.

He will not be eligible for Medicare for 5+ years after he gets his green card, which would be a bit. In some states, he might be eligible for some medical assistance (i.e. emergency care) regardless of his immigration status, provided he met the financial requirements (i.e. he is poor). However, then you get into the sponsorship thing--some states might go after you to recoup the medical bills, some might not (like California for example).

This thread might be helpful
http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...98#post8045998

One state/territory, Washington DC, has a free health care program for the poor regardless of immigration status. DC Health Care Alliance provides some services.

You might also look at high risk pools if your state offers one--insurance for those who cannot get insurance. But you are easily looking at $1500-$2000 a month IF you can get it.

Finally, see if your own health care plan offers 'dependent parent' coverage.

Unfortunately, at his age, it's pretty much as the original reply said--it's not going to happen. But look at these options in part to convince yourself you've tried all the options.

Good luck.


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