VA DMV tightens process

Old Dec 8th 2003, 11:11 pm
  #1  
Tarapia Tapioco
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Default VA DMV tightens process

About flipping time! 49 to go....

Link courtesy of http://zapa.mine.nu/

http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2...072003/1177906

DMV tightens process
Applicants for a drivers license will have to prove identity under rules inspired by 9/11 attacks.
By EDIE GROSS

Date published: 12/7/2003
It used to be that a drivers license was simply an indication that you knew how to drive, or at least had mastered it long enough to pass a skills test.
These days, the card--guaranteed to feature your worst portrait since seventh-grade picture day--is so much more than just a symbol of driving prowess.
Its proof of identity, that youre the person whose name is on that credit card youre flashing or on that plane ticket to Maui.
Beginning Jan. 1, a Virginia drivers license will also be proof that its owner is in this country legally.
Getting a Virginia license for the first time, or replacing an expired license, will require more paperwork and more patience--on the part of both the applicant and employees at the Department of Motor Vehicles.
But supporters of the new requirements, inspired in part by the events of Sept. 11, 2001, say theyll prevent illegal immigrants from posing as Virginia residents.
Right now, those seeking a state drivers license have to provide documents showing three things: their identity, their Social Security number and their Virginia address.
After Jan. 1, applicants will also have to present paperwork showing they are legally allowed to be in America.
For those born here, that could be a U.S. passport or a birth certificate. For those born in another country, proof of citizenship, naturalization or some other type of legal entry into the United States will be necessary.
"The reason is 14 people from my legislative district were assassinated at the Pentagon on 9/11. That terrorist act was made a little more easy by the Virginia DMV because seven of the terrorists had Virginia licenses," said Del. Dave Albo, R-Springfield, who sponsored the so-called "legal presence" legislation during this years General Assembly session.
"They were able to get on a plane with Virginia drivers licenses," Albo said. "Were not going to be giving licenses to people who cant prove theyre here legally."
Rules not just for foreign-born
Albo and fellow sponsor Sen. Jay OBrien, R-Clifton, are quick to point out that the state isnt singling out foreigners. The law applies to everyone, from the college student who moves here from Maryland to the chemical-engineering professor who comes in from Tokyo.
Even longtime Virginia residents are affected. If a World War II veteran born and raised in Spotsylvania lets his license expire, he cant get a new one without proof of legal presence.
The same goes for anyone trying to reinstate a license that has been suspended, revoked or canceled.
Those without a U.S. passport, original copy of their birth certificate or other required paperwork can get help obtaining documents from Virginias Office of Vital Records, OBrien said.
Once youve shown proof that youre in the country legally, you wont have to show proof again as long as you dont allow your license to expire.
The standard drivers license is issued for five years. If someone has permission to be in this country for less time than that, their license will expire when their federal documentation does, OBrien said.
The more stringent rules are a necessary part of the war on terror, OBrien said.
"I think prior to 9/11 the word in foreign countries was: Go to Virginia. Anyone can get a license. Its a cinch," he said. "We, the commonwealth, have an obligation to scrutinize the documents we give out."
Policy could cause delays
After the law was passed, DMV put together an 11-person panel of legal and transportation experts to come up with ways to implement the new rules.
Immigration lawyer Mark Rhoads, a member of that panel, said lines may move slower at DMV as applicants try to figure out which papers they need and DMV employees try to figure out which papers are acceptable.
The department is accepting about 25 different documents or combinations of documents to prove legal presence.
"Legislators that pass laws have no idea about immigration," said Rhoads, an attorney with Reed Smith in Richmond. "They have no idea what the documents are. People have an idea that you can present one single document to prove youre in the United States legally. Thats not so.
"Its going to be awful for DMV."
When in doubt, DMV may refuse to issue a license, which could create headaches for foreign academics and professionals who are here for legitimate purposes, Rhoads said.
"No one wants to be the one who gives a license to the next Mohammed Atta," said Rhoads, referring to the lead hijacker aboard American Airlines Flight 11, which crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center on 9/11.
"If theres a question, the answers going to be no," he said. "DMVs goal is to be fair and equitable, but realize its going to be a very difficult task to get people trained."
Agency spokeswoman Pam Goheen said DMV has offered extensive training to its employees over the past few months so they can recognize legal documents and help customers who dont understand the new policy.
"Its kind of like Y2K," she said. "You cant predict what the outcome is going to be, but youre trying to prepare for every eventuality."
According to the National Immigration Law Center, the District of Columbia and 36 states, including Virginia, have some sort of legal-presence requirement before issuing a drivers license or ID card.
Both Albo and OBrien conceded that the new rules may cause hassles at DMV. But, they said, most Virginians will agree that its necessary.
"Any citizen will nod their head and say this is one of the things since 9/11 Ive got to do, just like Ive got to get scanned at the airport," OBrien said. "Any U.S. citizen who has to experience inconvenience has to remember why were doing this."
An explanation of the new policy and a list of documents that can be used to prove "legal presence" are available in English and Spanish on DMVs Web site at dmvnow.com. For more information, you can also call 800/435-5137.
Date published: 12/7/2003
 
Old Dec 13th 2003, 3:58 am
  #2  
Tony
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Default Re: VA DMV tightens process

California already does that. And it will go on since the law signed by
Davis has been repealed.

Tony

"Tarapia Tapioco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > About flipping time! 49 to go....
    > Link courtesy of http://zapa.mine.nu/
    > http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2...072003/1177906
    > DMV tightens process
    > Applicants for a drivers license will have to prove identity under rules
inspired by 9/11 attacks.
    > By EDIE GROSS
    > Date published: 12/7/2003
    > It used to be that a drivers license was simply an indication that you
knew how to drive, or at least had mastered it long enough to pass a skills
test.
    > These days, the card--guaranteed to feature your worst portrait since
seventh-grade picture day--is so much more than just a symbol of driving
prowess.
    > Its proof of identity, that youre the person whose name is on that credit
card youre flashing or on that plane ticket to Maui.
    > Beginning Jan. 1, a Virginia drivers license will also be proof that its
owner is in this country legally.
    > Getting a Virginia license for the first time, or replacing an expired
license, will require more paperwork and more patience--on the part of both
the applicant and employees at the Department of Motor Vehicles.
    > But supporters of the new requirements, inspired in part by the events of
Sept. 11, 2001, say theyll prevent illegal immigrants from posing as
Virginia residents.
    > Right now, those seeking a state drivers license have to provide documents
showing three things: their identity, their Social Security number and their
Virginia address.
    > After Jan. 1, applicants will also have to present paperwork showing they
are legally allowed to be in America.
    > For those born here, that could be a U.S. passport or a birth certificate.
For those born in another country, proof of citizenship, naturalization or
some other type of legal entry into the United States will be necessary.
    > "The reason is 14 people from my legislative district were assassinated at
the Pentagon on 9/11. That terrorist act was made a little more easy by the
Virginia DMV because seven of the terrorists had Virginia licenses," said
Del. Dave Albo, R-Springfield, who sponsored the so-called "legal presence"
legislation during this years General Assembly session.
    > "They were able to get on a plane with Virginia drivers licenses," Albo
said. "Were not going to be giving licenses to people who cant prove theyre
here legally."
    > Rules not just for foreign-born
    > Albo and fellow sponsor Sen. Jay OBrien, R-Clifton, are quick to point out
that the state isnt singling out foreigners. The law applies to everyone,
from the college student who moves here from Maryland to the
chemical-engineering professor who comes in from Tokyo.
    > Even longtime Virginia residents are affected. If a World War II veteran
born and raised in Spotsylvania lets his license expire, he cant get a new
one without proof of legal presence.
    > The same goes for anyone trying to reinstate a license that has been
suspended, revoked or canceled.
    > Those without a U.S. passport, original copy of their birth certificate or
other required paperwork can get help obtaining documents from Virginias
Office of Vital Records, OBrien said.
    > Once youve shown proof that youre in the country legally, you wont have to
show proof again as long as you dont allow your license to expire.
    > The standard drivers license is issued for five years. If someone has
permission to be in this country for less time than that, their license will
expire when their federal documentation does, OBrien said.
    > The more stringent rules are a necessary part of the war on terror, OBrien
said.
    > "I think prior to 9/11 the word in foreign countries was: Go to Virginia.
Anyone can get a license. Its a cinch," he said. "We, the commonwealth, have
an obligation to scrutinize the documents we give out."
    > Policy could cause delays
    > After the law was passed, DMV put together an 11-person panel of legal and
transportation experts to come up with ways to implement the new rules.
    > Immigration lawyer Mark Rhoads, a member of that panel, said lines may
move slower at DMV as applicants try to figure out which papers they need
and DMV employees try to figure out which papers are acceptable.
    > The department is accepting about 25 different documents or combinations
of documents to prove legal presence.
    > "Legislators that pass laws have no idea about immigration," said Rhoads,
an attorney with Reed Smith in Richmond. "They have no idea what the
documents are. People have an idea that you can present one single document
to prove youre in the United States legally. Thats not so.
    > "Its going to be awful for DMV."
    > When in doubt, DMV may refuse to issue a license, which could create
headaches for foreign academics and professionals who are here for
legitimate purposes, Rhoads said.
    > "No one wants to be the one who gives a license to the next Mohammed
Atta," said Rhoads, referring to the lead hijacker aboard American Airlines
Flight 11, which crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center on
9/11.
    > "If theres a question, the answers going to be no," he said. "DMVs goal is
to be fair and equitable, but realize its going to be a very difficult task
to get people trained."
    > Agency spokeswoman Pam Goheen said DMV has offered extensive training to
its employees over the past few months so they can recognize legal documents
and help customers who dont understand the new policy.
    > "Its kind of like Y2K," she said. "You cant predict what the outcome is
going to be, but youre trying to prepare for every eventuality."
    > According to the National Immigration Law Center, the District of Columbia
and 36 states, including Virginia, have some sort of legal-presence
requirement before issuing a drivers license or ID card.
    > Both Albo and OBrien conceded that the new rules may cause hassles at DMV.
But, they said, most Virginians will agree that its necessary.
    > "Any citizen will nod their head and say this is one of the things since
9/11 Ive got to do, just like Ive got to get scanned at the airport," OBrien
said. "Any U.S. citizen who has to experience inconvenience has to remember
why were doing this."
    > An explanation of the new policy and a list of documents that can be used
to prove "legal presence" are available in English and Spanish on DMVs Web
site at dmvnow.com. For more information, you can also call 800/435-5137.
    > Date published: 12/7/2003
 
Old Dec 13th 2003, 4:46 pm
  #3  
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Default Re: VA DMV tightens process

hmmmmmmmmmm. so there will be no terrorism if we tightness the driving licenses process.
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