Go Back  British Expats > Living & Moving Abroad > USA > US Immigration, Citizenship and Visas
Reload this Page >

An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

Old Oct 24th 2005, 11:16 am
  #1  
tiredimmigrant
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

As a would-be immigrant from India to the US, and someone who has lived
in the US for about 10 years, I hit a low patch and wanted to share my
story with people who would understand.

I wrote my own tale here: http://tired-immigrant.blogspot.com/


I'd love to hear other people's stories about their immigration. I'm
not interested in the forms and applications of immigration. I'm
interested in the human stories, the way your life was changed or
wasn't, the good and the bad, the tears and the laughter.

Thank you for listening.


- A tired "would-be" immigrant
 
Old Oct 24th 2005, 7:36 pm
  #2  
Amanda
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

Here is mine, just a brief one. I grew up under military rule with
socialism (corrupt) + discrimination of us foreign descendants. My
parents were from wealthy background of the old who lost everything
(except the house they were living in) before I was born.

So I would hear stories of their era but still the reason I hated the
military rule was not because my parents or grandparent's money they
took away - I was ok that they nationalized it for the sake of the
publics - but I couldn't stand the way we, the people had to kiss even
the lowest level of clerk in every paper work and there wwre a lot in
military ruled countries. So I was always fond of America, reading
about the freedom and stuff. I personally have not met any foreigners
who loved America as much as I was loving.

Years passed by and one things after another, like you who belived in
hard work - I became disappointed that the majority of Americans just
watch TV and eat instead of appreciating and continuing with what their
founding father fought for.

I became aware of Objectivism. There is a google ng where some
Objectivists have no clue ...

In recent years, I started thinking if my country was improved as much
as India, I would go back and wouldn't prticipate in this system. (In
fact, when I first got here, I was hoping that my country will change
and that I would go back and help build the country with my education.)
If the situation changes there, I would be able to go back and forth
freely also. Big dreams to change the world and like you I ended up
only changing my life. A couple ofyears ago, I started wishing to work
in Thailand - got fed up with US - and wanted some sort of normal life
but my health has been ruined (from stress due to struggles) and
Bangkok is very polluted and not suitable for my nasla condition + also
as long as I hold a passport of my country, I will have instbaility.
Currenlty GC pending, I still kind of wish to go work in Thailand. And
to maintian GC, I need to stay in US. So even when I want to give up on
US, I can't do that wihthout kind of committing suicide:)- But, there
are millions of people in the world suffering because we a species
fails (that's my opinion) and so I try not to be bitter. In a way, I am
too weak to even feel bitter.

Like you said, the DV programs brought a lot of people from back home
suitable for low level service. Most are in CA. These people bring
their parents and apply for all kind of benefits for the parents. They
themselves are in low income bracket and get benefits while I never
even thought of checking any discoutn in phone service or electricity
based on income. I am not jealous of them since my country is in
really bad situation despite the rich natural resources but am
thoroguhly disappointed with the system here - a system that is
incapable of screening marraige fraud anmd other frauds - and the
world too.

Frankly, I was not too excited when the time to apply for GC was
approaching for me but as the time gets near, I have realise how much
my life depends on it. There is a saying that "Everything comes to
those who wiats." If I knew that the waiting would have bene this
long, I wonder whether I would have given up but I think I wouldn't
because I think that I still dream, naievely, that the system would get
better. Or I am simply living in delusion to make my pain less:)-

I used to be spiritual about things that happens but I stopped doing
that and accept that we as a species fail, period. There is no need for
the level of suffering in Africa and we are all responsible for it.
But like you said, we the little people couldn't change the world and
we have been forced to change ourselves. Buddhism sound suitable to
cope with these things but that would be like finding justification for
our species.

I used to debate with people so enthusiastically but now, I just keep
my mouth shut. I only state my opinion in ng nowadays.

Dreams are good; We need it to continue in life.

So you dream to build a life with your wife:)-
 
Old Oct 24th 2005, 9:49 pm
  #3  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 234
bantik2005 has a spectacular aura aboutbantik2005 has a spectacular aura aboutbantik2005 has a spectacular aura about
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

Originally Posted by Amanda
Years passed by and one things after another, like you who belived in
hard work - I became disappointed that the majority of Americans just
watch TV and eat instead of appreciating and continuing with what their
founding father fought for.
I am not agree on that one, there are different people in each country.

but one thing I know for sure:

USA is the best country ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Viva AMERICA!
bantik2005 is offline  
Old Oct 25th 2005, 12:22 am
  #4  
strangely floppy..
 
CarlM's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Ohio - originally London
Posts: 1,719
CarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

Originally Posted by Amanda
Here is mine, just a brief one. I grew up under military rule with
socialism (corrupt) + discrimination of us foreign descendants. My
parents were from wealthy background of the old who lost everything
(except the house they were living in) before I was born.

So I would hear stories of their era but still the reason I hated the
military rule was not because my parents or grandparent's money they
took away - I was ok that they nationalized it for the sake of the
publics - but I couldn't stand the way we, the people had to kiss even
the lowest level of clerk in every paper work and there wwre a lot in
military ruled countries. So I was always fond of America, reading
about the freedom and stuff. I personally have not met any foreigners
who loved America as much as I was loving.

Years passed by and one things after another, like you who belived in
hard work - I became disappointed that the majority of Americans just
watch TV and eat instead of appreciating and continuing with what their
founding father fought for.

I became aware of Objectivism. There is a google ng where some
Objectivists have no clue ...

In recent years, I started thinking if my country was improved as much
as India, I would go back and wouldn't prticipate in this system. (In
fact, when I first got here, I was hoping that my country will change
and that I would go back and help build the country with my education.)
If the situation changes there, I would be able to go back and forth
freely also. Big dreams to change the world and like you I ended up
only changing my life. A couple ofyears ago, I started wishing to work
in Thailand - got fed up with US - and wanted some sort of normal life
but my health has been ruined (from stress due to struggles) and
Bangkok is very polluted and not suitable for my nasla condition + also
as long as I hold a passport of my country, I will have instbaility.
Currenlty GC pending, I still kind of wish to go work in Thailand. And
to maintian GC, I need to stay in US. So even when I want to give up on
US, I can't do that wihthout kind of committing suicide- But, there
are millions of people in the world suffering because we a species
fails (that's my opinion) and so I try not to be bitter. In a way, I am
too weak to even feel bitter.

Like you said, the DV programs brought a lot of people from back home
suitable for low level service. Most are in CA. These people bring
their parents and apply for all kind of benefits for the parents. They
themselves are in low income bracket and get benefits while I never
even thought of checking any discoutn in phone service or electricity
based on income. I am not jealous of them since my country is in
really bad situation despite the rich natural resources but am
thoroguhly disappointed with the system here - a system that is
incapable of screening marraige fraud anmd other frauds - and the
world too.

Frankly, I was not too excited when the time to apply for GC was
approaching for me but as the time gets near, I have realise how much
my life depends on it. There is a saying that "Everything comes to
those who wiats." If I knew that the waiting would have bene this
long, I wonder whether I would have given up but I think I wouldn't
because I think that I still dream, naievely, that the system would get
better. Or I am simply living in delusion to make my pain less-

I used to be spiritual about things that happens but I stopped doing
that and accept that we as a species fail, period. There is no need for
the level of suffering in Africa and we are all responsible for it.
But like you said, we the little people couldn't change the world and
we have been forced to change ourselves. Buddhism sound suitable to
cope with these things but that would be like finding justification for
our species.

I used to debate with people so enthusiastically but now, I just keep
my mouth shut. I only state my opinion in ng nowadays.

Dreams are good; We need it to continue in life.

So you dream to build a life with your wife-
You are just a bundle of excitement arent you??
CarlM is offline  
Old Oct 25th 2005, 1:47 am
  #5  
Amanda
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

bantik2005 wrote:
[..]
    > I am not agree on that one, there are different people in each country.
    > but one thing I know for sure:
    > USA is the best country ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    > Viva AMERICA!
Yes, USA is the best when you compared with other failed sociteies of
our species but does that justify the fact that this society fails? And
people like you don't even have the capability to comprehend that what
little you have is gonna go away while you keep shouting "USA is best"
and continue to watch TV and eating more than you need. Rome was best
once, you know?:)-

    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 2:02 am
  #6  
Amanda
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

CarlM wrote:

[..]

    > You are just a bundle of excitement arent you?

Look around and truly hear and see. Are you proud of our species?
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 3:28 am
  #7  
strangely floppy..
 
CarlM's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Ohio - originally London
Posts: 1,719
CarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond reputeCarlM has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

Originally Posted by Amanda
CarlM wrote:

[..]

    > You are just a bundle of excitement arent you?

Look around and truly hear and see. Are you proud of our species?
Incredibly proud.

I work with international students and it always inspires me to see them struggle through, but stick with it and graduate. I love meeting students from all over the world who are looking to take something back to their home countries and better themselves.. you can choose to focus on all the problems in the world, or to look for positive signs, signs of kindness which are everywhere. Yes, there are problems in this world, and there always will be - but to condition yourself that life should be miserable because of it.. its you who will lose out.
CarlM is offline  
Old Oct 25th 2005, 5:32 am
  #8  
williammaw
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

You seemed like a good writer, and makes me wonder if you are in the
wrong profession? Anyway, I hope that things work out for you.

Cheers ...


[email protected] wrote:
    > As a would-be immigrant from India to the US, and someone who has lived
    > in the US for about 10 years, I hit a low patch and wanted to share my
    > story with people who would understand.
    > I wrote my own tale here: http://tired-immigrant.blogspot.com/
    > I'd love to hear other people's stories about their immigration. I'm
    > not interested in the forms and applications of immigration. I'm
    > interested in the human stories, the way your life was changed or
    > wasn't, the good and the bad, the tears and the laughter.
    >
    > Thank you for listening.
    >
    >
    > - A tired "would-be" immigrant
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 6:34 am
  #9  
JimSocal
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

On 25 Oct 2005 10:32:47 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >You seemed like a good writer, and makes me wonder if you are in the
    >wrong profession? Anyway, I hope that things work out for you.
    >Cheers ...
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> As a would-be immigrant from India to the US, and someone who has lived
    >> in the US for about 10 years, I hit a low patch and wanted to share my
    >> story with people who would understand.
    >> I wrote my own tale here: http://tired-immigrant.blogspot.com/
    >> I'd love to hear other people's stories about their immigration. I'm
    >> not interested in the forms and applications of immigration. I'm
    >> interested in the human stories, the way your life was changed or
    >> wasn't, the good and the bad, the tears and the laughter.
    >>
    >> Thank you for listening.
    >>
    >>
    >> - A tired "would-be" immigrant
The U.S. does not care about immigrants.
The entire process is designed to make you feel like cattle being
processed for slaughter.
The entire process is meant to frustrate and discourage you.
The entire process is meant to dehumanize you.
The USCIS is an organization filled with morons and incompetents,
bureaucratic robots.
WELCOME TO AMERIKA.
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 7:37 am
  #10  
Ritze
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

Are you expecting that there should be a country that is perfect in all
aspects? Why not just simply appreciate what America has offered you and
accept it for what it is with all the good and the bad. People in America
are the way they are because they are allowed and free to do what they are
doing. People in other parts of the world are the way they are because of
what the their collective system and culture do to them. You have to learn
how to be appreciative the general good of America without being too
unreasonable seeking for that mythical perfect society.
America will be what it will be as its citizenry wants it to be. Do you want
it to stay better or worse? That is the most important decision you have to
make!




"amanda" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected] oups.com...
    > bantik2005 wrote:
    > [..]
    >> I am not agree on that one, there are different people in each country.
    >> but one thing I know for sure:
    >> USA is the best country ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    >> Viva AMERICA!
    > Yes, USA is the best when you compared with other failed sociteies of
    > our species but does that justify the fact that this society fails? And
    > people like you don't even have the capability to comprehend that what
    > little you have is gonna go away while you keep shouting "USA is best"
    > and continue to watch TV and eating more than you need. Rome was best
    > once, you know?:)-
    >> --
    >> Posted via http://britishexpats.com
    >
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 7:44 am
  #11  
Ritze
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

What country do you recommend every immigrant should go to?
And where did you say you are you living now?

You are what you make yourself to be!

;)



"JimSocal" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > On 25 Oct 2005 10:32:47 -0700, > The U.S. does not care about immigrants.
    > The entire process is designed to make you feel like cattle being
    > processed for slaughter.
    > The entire process is meant to frustrate and discourage you.
    > The entire process is meant to dehumanize you.
    > The USCIS is an organization filled with morons and incompetents,
    > bureaucratic robots.
    > WELCOME TO AMERIKA.
    >
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 9:03 am
  #12  
L D Jones
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

JimSocal wrote:
    > On 25 Oct 2005 10:32:47 -0700, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    >>You seemed like a good writer, and makes me wonder if you are in the
    >>wrong profession? Anyway, I hope that things work out for you.
    >>Cheers ...
    >>[email protected] wrote:
    >>>As a would-be immigrant from India to the US, and someone who has lived
    >>>in the US for about 10 years, I hit a low patch and wanted to share my
    >>>story with people who would understand.
    >>>I wrote my own tale here: http://tired-immigrant.blogspot.com/
    >>>I'd love to hear other people's stories about their immigration. I'm
    >>>not interested in the forms and applications of immigration. I'm
    >>>interested in the human stories, the way your life was changed or
    >>>wasn't, the good and the bad, the tears and the laughter.
    >>>Thank you for listening.
    >>> - A tired "would-be" immigrant
    >
    > The U.S. does not care about immigrants.

If that were true none would be let in. This country couldn't survive
without them. Japan doesn't care about immigrants

    > WELCOME TO AMERIKA.

Cute spelling. It was mildly amusing 30 years ago
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 11:32 am
  #13  
Voltron Beta 2
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

I sort of know and understand where you are coming from, I think your
biggest mistake was to make permanent residence/greencard the
cornerstone of your career in America. I came to America almost 10
years ago and never settled for any one company based solely on their
ability or willingness to sponsor greencard for me. In fact, several of
my employers found my lack of interest in greencard processing
suspicious and sure sign of lack of long term comittment, which
interestingly kept them on their toes in trying to retain me, with
limited success :)

Basically what I did was spent my 6 years of H1B period with some of
the best people I could find and made sure that I impressed the heck
out of them, leaving each and every one of them on best of terms and
when the time came to say our goodbye at the end of 6 years, guess
what? more than one of these companies offered to process my greencard
while I worked at any of their foreign subsidiaries in Europe,
Australia or anywhere else in the world in hopes that I would decide to
come back to America and work for them again. In the end, I chose to
work for the european arm of one of these companies while they work on
getting my greencard process going. I chose this company because it
values its people even more than its bottomline and distributes its end
of year profits equitably to its employees based on a peer review
process.

The funny thing is that I am begining to like my life here in Europe
enough that I was actually thankful that the dates retrogressed causing
a delay of atleast one or more years in our green card processing which
was in its last stages (I-140). This means, were it not for this delay,
I would have had to move back to America as a greencard holder working
for my sponsor company and earning my salary in weak American dollar in
order to keep my end of the bargain and from my greedy perspective, I
think it has worked out quite nicely.

Anyway, best of luck in your endeavours, feel free to get in touch with
me, if anything I understand where you are coming from and believe that
you may have the same long term goals and aspirations that I do,
including in the end, not making immigration the cornerstone of your
life. I must say though, that you are lucky to be Indian because you
can go back to your country and still have plenty of opportunities to
grow and use your abilities, I certainly envy you from that point of
view. Best of luck again in whatever you choose to do.
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 2:13 pm
  #14  
williammaw
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

Hello,

One thing that I've always wondered about is what makes Europeans
(Western) want to move to US? Is housing outrageously expensive, do
they charge you exorbitant fees to drive Porsches, Mercedes and
Ferraris, are taxes unreasonably high, or is it the lack of
opportunities for enterprising?

I have a lot of respect for US but just wondered what the motivation
factors are, considering you have EU over there, which I think is a
formidable power house?

I meant not offense, but in case I did, please accept my apologies.

Thank you ...


Voltron Beta 2 wrote:
    > I sort of know and understand where you are coming from, I think your
    > biggest mistake was to make permanent residence/greencard the
    > cornerstone of your career in America. I came to America almost 10
    > years ago and never settled for any one company based solely on their
    > ability or willingness to sponsor greencard for me. In fact, several of
    > my employers found my lack of interest in greencard processing
    > suspicious and sure sign of lack of long term comittment, which
    > interestingly kept them on their toes in trying to retain me, with
    > limited success :)
    > Basically what I did was spent my 6 years of H1B period with some of
    > the best people I could find and made sure that I impressed the heck
    > out of them, leaving each and every one of them on best of terms and
    > when the time came to say our goodbye at the end of 6 years, guess
    > what? more than one of these companies offered to process my greencard
    > while I worked at any of their foreign subsidiaries in Europe,
    > Australia or anywhere else in the world in hopes that I would decide to
    > come back to America and work for them again. In the end, I chose to
    > work for the european arm of one of these companies while they work on
    > getting my greencard process going. I chose this company because it
    > values its people even more than its bottomline and distributes its end
    > of year profits equitably to its employees based on a peer review
    > process.
    > The funny thing is that I am begining to like my life here in Europe
    > enough that I was actually thankful that the dates retrogressed causing
    > a delay of atleast one or more years in our green card processing which
    > was in its last stages (I-140). This means, were it not for this delay,
    > I would have had to move back to America as a greencard holder working
    > for my sponsor company and earning my salary in weak American dollar in
    > order to keep my end of the bargain and from my greedy perspective, I
    > think it has worked out quite nicely.
    > Anyway, best of luck in your endeavours, feel free to get in touch with
    > me, if anything I understand where you are coming from and believe that
    > you may have the same long term goals and aspirations that I do,
    > including in the end, not making immigration the cornerstone of your
    > life. I must say though, that you are lucky to be Indian because you
    > can go back to your country and still have plenty of opportunities to
    > grow and use your abilities, I certainly envy you from that point of
    > view. Best of luck again in whatever you choose to do.
 
Old Oct 25th 2005, 5:24 pm
  #15  
Amanda
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: An immigrant's story ... I hope it's not too poignant

CarlM wrote:
    > > CarlM wrote:
    > >
    > > [..]
    > >
    > > > You are just a bundle of excitement arent you?
    > >
    > > Look around and truly hear and see. Are you proud of our species?
    > Incredibly proud.
    > I work with international students and it always inspires me to see them
    > struggle through, but stick with it and graduate. I love meeting
    > students from all over the world who are looking to take something back
    > to their home countries and better themselves.. you can choose to focus
    > on all the problems in the world, or to look for positive signs, signs
    > of kindness which are everywhere.
    >Yes, there are problems in this world,
    > and there always will be - but to condition yourself that life should be
    > miserable because of it.. its you who will lose out.
Who said that I am conditioning myself that life should be miserable. I
AM JUST BEING OBJECTIVE. Rather opposite that life should not be
miserable for anybody in the world to the extent that misery exists in
the world for the majority of the people.


    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 

Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.