F-1 Visa to Permanent Residence

Old Nov 3rd 2005, 10:46 am
  #1  
ChrisPidgley
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Default F-1 Visa to Permanent Residence

Desperately in need of help

I am currently a British citizen, at the moment completing my A Levels.
After this I want to study at an American University. For this I
understant I will need to get a F-1 Visa, and am aware of the process
that is required to gain this.
However I would prefer to study under permanent residence, however I
have no family realted to US citizens whatsoever, and due to my age am
unable to meet anything but the most basic and longest processing time
labour requirements. Are there any ways of obtaining permanent
residence within the US, considering my difficulties. I would like to
gain permanent residence as soon as possible, so i can do my studies
under this, taking app. 4 years, and then waiting another year, before
i can then become a US naturalized citizen, and then join the USAF

Please could someone help me

Yours Sincerely Chris Pidgley
 
Old Nov 3rd 2005, 12:03 pm
  #2  
John D'Arcy
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Default Re: F-1 Visa to Permanent Residence

Upon your acceptance to a US institution, you can study in the US.
First you'll need to get accepted, upon where the college / uni will
issue an I-20 which you must take to the embassy for an interview. This
is strictly non-immigrant, and you must prove that you do not intend to
stay there.

I'm sure someone else can provide you with a more detailed list,
however there are few options for non residents to live as permanent
residents in the US. Marriage is one option. Investing is another. It
is possible to go straight to a green card with the right amount of
investment ($500,000 - $1 million). Being sponsored for work is yet
another option. However, if you wish to study as a permanent resident,
especially with limited time constraints, your options are limited at
best.

That's not to say it's impossible. If you have a business worth $2
million with say 50 employees in the US, I'm sure you could try
applying for a permanent resident investor GC. Or you could simply
marry a USC. However, marriage purely for a GC falls foul of the law.
That's not to say you can't go there under an F-1, and simply and truly
fall in love and then marry. Either way, keep it honest. It works out
much better in the long run.

Take care.
 
Old Nov 3rd 2005, 3:04 pm
  #3  
Account Closed
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 2
scrubbedexpat099 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: F-1 Visa to Permanent Residence

Originally Posted by John D'Arcy
Upon your acceptance to a US institution, you can study in the US.
First you'll need to get accepted, upon where the college / uni will
issue an I-20 which you must take to the embassy for an interview. This
is strictly non-immigrant, and you must prove that you do not intend to
stay there.

I'm sure someone else can provide you with a more detailed list,
however there are few options for non residents to live as permanent
residents in the US. Marriage is one option. Investing is another. It
is possible to go straight to a green card with the right amount of
investment ($500,000 - $1 million). Being sponsored for work is yet
another option. However, if you wish to study as a permanent resident,
especially with limited time constraints, your options are limited at
best.

That's not to say it's impossible. If you have a business worth $2
million with say 50 employees in the US, I'm sure you could try
applying for a permanent resident investor GC. Or you could simply
marry a USC. However, marriage purely for a GC falls foul of the law.
That's not to say you can't go there under an F-1, and simply and truly
fall in love and then marry. Either way, keep it honest. It works out
much better in the long run.

Take care.
http://britishexpats.com/articles/000089.html

You can join as a LPR btw.
scrubbedexpat099 is offline  
Old Nov 3rd 2005, 6:26 pm
  #4  
Kevin Keane
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Default Re: F-1 Visa to Permanent Residence

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Hash: SHA1

ChrisPidgley wrote:

    > Desperately in need of help
    >
    > I am currently a British citizen, at the moment completing my A Levels.
    > After this I want to study at an American University. For this I
    > understant I will need to get a F-1 Visa, and am aware of the process
    > that is required to gain this.
    > However I would prefer to study under permanent residence, however I
    > have no family realted to US citizens whatsoever, and due to my age am
    > unable to meet anything but the most basic and longest processing time
    > labour requirements.

Unfortunately, that probably means that you are pretty much out of luck. In
all honesty, a large portion of those studying with an F-1 visa would
prefer to study as permanent residents.

    > Are there any ways of obtaining permanent residence within the US,
    > considering my difficulties.

If you have a US girlfriend, marry her (but DO NOT find a US girlfriend just
for the visa! That would be inviting a lot of trouble).

    > I would like to
    > gain permanent residence as soon as possible, so i can do my studies
    > under this, taking app. 4 years, and then waiting another year, before
    > i can then become a US naturalized citizen, and then join the USAF

Is becoming a citizen and then joining the military your main purpose for
wanting to be a permanent resident? Theoretically, you could ask the
military to sponsor you just like any other employer does (you do not need
to be a citizen in order to join the military, only in order to become an
officer), but in practice they do not do it. Once you are accepted into the
military, you - currently - become immediately eligible for US citizenship.

I would not be surprised if at some point in the near future, they
officially allowed non-residents to join the military, given the
recruitment problems they are having. Currently, there already seems to be
a nod-nod-wink-wink procedure where the military doesn't look too closely
at documents submitted, and many illegal immigrants already are joining the
military and get legal status and a very quick path to citizenship that
way. It's still illegal and not a good idea either.

- --
Please visit my FAQ at http://www.kkeane.com before asking a question here.
It may answer your question. Remember, I am strictly a layperson without
any legal training. I encourage the reader to seek competent legal counsel
rather than relying on usenet newsgroups.
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Old Nov 4th 2005, 4:22 am
  #5  
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Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 2
scrubbedexpat099 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: F-1 Visa to Permanent Residence

Originally Posted by Kevin Keane

I would not be surprised if at some point in the near future, they
officially allowed non-residents to join the military, given the
recruitment problems they are having. Currently, there already seems to be
a nod-nod-wink-wink procedure where the military doesn't look too closely
at documents submitted, and many illegal immigrants already are joining the
military and get legal status and a very quick path to citizenship that
way. It's still illegal and not a good idea either.
Well there is plenty of historical, they would be called mercenaries.

The unusual twist would be in providing Citizenship as a bait, personally seems completely valid to me.

Would bring a whole new meaning to those Honourably Discgharged Veteran numberplates.

Still waiting to see my first Dishonourable one.
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