Denied. Now the waiver part

Old Feb 4th 2001, 11:47 pm
  #1  
callieslv
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It seems the "minor" conviction isn't so minor. It's caused a denial. I've written the
hardship letter, I've attached supporting documentation for my case, I've requested a
letter from those who know
me/us, but still....

From Sweden, it will go to Denmark. Fingerprints (to be taken on Wednesday) will go to the
FBI. The Consul has been helpful and kind, and is even including a recommendation to grant
the visa. However, there is still now more waiting.

Support on this, anyone?

Details - shoplifting, 1984. He was 18, just barely (3 months). And the penalty was a
suspended sentence, providing he not do anything else, a fine which he paid, and a "slap
on the wrist" by the judge, who basically said that yes, he could say jail time, but
because of the age, and no previous trouble, the fine would be enough. And since there has
been no trouble since that time, the Consul feels it's quite enough. But she still said at
least 2 weeks, perhaps 2 months.

What I'd like to know is --- what's the reality here? 2 months, or 2 years? Is there
anyone who has had to wait for a similar reason? Is there reason to believe it might move
quickly? Is there reason to hope that with the recommendation letter, that all paperwork
will go as fast as humanly possible and 2 weeks is not out of line? Is there reason to go
crawl under a rock and cry now?

I know, I know, others wait, and longer than I will. I am painfully aware of that. It was
the reason we chose the DCF route. So that the waiting would be shorter. In fact, we were
so prepared (we thought!) that we expected no more than a week apart.

But this one just hurts. So I sit here now, and for whatever reason, the fax at the
Embassy doesn't want to speak to my fax machine, so I have to make other
arrangements for this.

At least with all the links and sites available, I was able to write a coherent letter.
Thanks to all here, Alvena in particular, as I do tend to start with her site.

callie - waiting and now wondering, how much longer, really.
 
Old Feb 5th 2001, 1:29 am
  #2  
Stephen Thompson
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>What I'd like to know is --- what's the reality here? 2 months, or 2 years? Is there
>anyone who has had to wait for a similar reason? Is there reason to believe it might move
>quickly? Is there reason to hope that with the recommendation letter, that all paperwork
>will go as fast as humanly possible and 2 weeks is not out of line? Is there reason to go
>crawl under a rock and cry now?
>

exactly the same circumstance, except London consulate, it took 5 days

Steve
 
Old Feb 5th 2001, 1:56 am
  #3  
Ellen
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Callie,

I'm sorry to hear about this but I think, as Alvena said, you have the consulate on your
side, that has to help. I don't know anyone who had a similar situation but I do think the
consulate in Stockholm does their best to HELP people. I know of another Swedish-American
couple who had a little wrinkle in their DCF (an I-864 mix up) and the consulate told them
all they had to do was supply them with a corrected I-864 and one other paper they had
forgotten and they would get the visa. They also panicked, would that really be it? I felt
sure at the time that the consulate wouldn't say something that wasn't true. And when the
proper papers had been received, they issued the visa immediately.

So, I guess I'm just saying, chin up, I think they wouldn't tell you two weeks to two
months if it really would be two years. Try the fax number in the middle of the night
Stockholm time.

Lycka till Ellen

In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
> It seems the "minor" conviction isn't so minor. It's caused a
denial.
> I've written the hardship letter, I've attached supporting documentation for my case,
> I've requested a letter from those
who know
> me/us, but still....
>
> From Sweden, it will go to Denmark. Fingerprints (to be taken on Wednesday) will go to
> the FBI. The Consul has been helpful and
kind,
> and is even including a recommendation to grant the visa.
However,
> there is still now more waiting.
>
> Support on this, anyone?
>
> Details - shoplifting, 1984. He was 18, just barely (3 months).
And
> the penalty was a suspended sentence, providing he not do
anything
> else, a fine which he paid, and a "slap on the wrist" by the judge,
who
> basically said that yes, he could say jail time, but because of the age, and no previous
> trouble, the fine would be enough. And
since
> there has been no trouble since that time, the Consul feels it's
quite
> enough. But she still said at least 2 weeks, perhaps 2 months.
>
> What I'd like to know is --- what's the reality here? 2 months, or 2 years? Is there
> anyone who has had to wait for a similar
reason? Is
> there reason to believe it might move quickly? Is there reason to
hope
> that with the recommendation letter, that all paperwork will go as
fast
> as humanly possible and 2 weeks is not out of line? Is there
reason to
> go crawl under a rock and cry now?
>
> I know, I know, others wait, and longer than I will. I am painfully aware of that. It
> was the reason we chose the DCF route. So
that the
> waiting would be shorter. In fact, we were so prepared (we
thought!)
> that we expected no more than a week apart.
>
> But this one just hurts. So I sit here now, and for whatever
reason,
> the fax at the Embassy doesn't want to speak to my fax machine,
so I
> have to make other arrangements for this.
>
> At least with all the links and sites available, I was able to write a coherent letter.
> Thanks to all here, Alvena in particular, as I do tend to start with her site.
>
> callie - waiting and now wondering, how much longer, really.
 
Old Feb 5th 2001, 3:16 am
  #4  
Onigiri
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<<snip>>
> go crawl under a rock and cry now?
<<snip>> if we go by previous Canadian and Western European experience, you do not have
too long to wait before the wrinkles are ironed out. However, you can use this emotional
experience and difficult time on your Jean val-Jean (cf. Les Miserables, V.Hugo) forever
into the future. J-v-J was in a quarry for only 19 years. Good luck to you.
 
Old Feb 5th 2001, 1:29 pm
  #5  
callieslv
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Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you all. A bit of assurance, it's amazing how much that helps.

I've written responses to this several times now, but it all boils down to the sentence
above. Thank you.
 

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