Changing names by deedpoll

Old May 26th 2001, 4:49 pm
  #1  
Dana
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I hold a British Passport and a green card and live in California. I plan to change
my burdensome name. I realize I could change my name by court order in State court in
California and I have my reasons for not wanting to do that.

I plan to change my name under British law by the usual British process for ex-pats
(called deedpoll) and then to get a new British passport with my new name. If earlier
practice is followed, on request, I get my old passport (with my old name) with the
corners cut off and a big "CANCELLED" stamped on every page (in addition to my new
passport).

After that, I plan to take these passports to the INS together with my green card to
get a new green card in my new name.

Then with the newgreen card it's off to Social Security, DMV and bank for
name changes.

Does anyone foresee a problem with this approach? I have access to Lexis.com/research
but darned if I can find anything in there about whether the Feds recognize changes
of name processed in foreign jurisdictions - if anyone can point me to a relevant
treaty, statute, rule or case that'd be champion! (You might guess I haven't entirely
lost my North country heritage
 
Old May 29th 2001, 12:52 pm
  #2  
David R. Tucker
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My "gut feeling" (what? not authoritative enough for you?) is that to effect a change
of name you have to do it under the law of the jurisdiction of your domicile, which
is California. Usually a name change requires either a (competent) court order or a
marriage certificate to support the new name. Certainly that's what the I-90
instructions say. It's probably going to be true for all your other
ID (i.e., a new "green card" won't help with your driver's license if you don't have
a court order). I don't think two separate passports (or the deedpoll) are
going to do the trick. On the other hand, it only costs a few bucks to try.

I'd love to know what your reasons are. California's requirements don't seem
especially onerous, and a lawyer would probably charge $150 to $250 to do all the
work for you.

--
David R. Tucker [email protected]

"I may be wrong, but I'm not Clearly Erroneous."

- Judge Hillman
 

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