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Australian looking to immigrate to the US ~ no degree however ...

Australian looking to immigrate to the US ~ no degree however ...

Old Jan 25th 2001, 5:03 am
  #1  
Adrian
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Hi there,

Im 30, have 10 years work experience, and 5 in IT Professionally.

Im not degree qualified, however, Im industry certified (CNA, MCSE)

I understand someone said that to immigrate, you are required to possess 12 years
professional experience or a degree - is this entirely correct? does the possession of an
MCSE carry any weight (set aside the pros/cons of it, from a technical perspective - im
talking from a Dept of Immigration Perspective)

What avenues are open to someone like me?

Should I keep working for another 6 before re-assessing it? Try and get a degree in the
meantime? (although part time , its gonna be 6 years anyways) See an Immigration Lawyer-
as they can past stuff, for the right price??

Adrian
 
Old Jan 25th 2001, 7:56 am
  #2  
Apwpronto
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Posts: n/a
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Hi there,
>Im 30, have 10 years work experience, and 5 in IT Professionally.
>
>Im not degree qualified, however, Im industry certified (CNA, MCSE)
>
>I understand someone said that to immigrate, you are required to possess 12 years
>professional experience or a degree - is this entirely correct?

You can move your butt in as long as you have breath in your lungs. I mean, the INS
doesn't care about professional experience. If you had 100 years of professional
experience, the INS wouldn't give you green card without an employer hiring you for your
distinct job qualification.

So, your job experience is a plus but doesn't get you the card if your experience doesn't
get you to find an employer to sponsor you for green card.

I mean, day in and day out, thousands of Mexicans (border hoppers) hop over the border and
immigrate to the U.S. However, they remain as illegal immigrants. Immigrating to the U.S.
is just a beginning of a long and tiresome journey that involves dealing with the INS and
its relentlessly tiresome screw-ups for many years to come.

Do you think the Nazis were bad? Wait until you deal with the INS.

>does the possession of an MCSE carry any weight (set aside the pros/cons of it, from a
>technical perspective - im talking from a Dept of Immigration Perspective)

I think you have a wrong conception of green card entitlement. The INS holds the ultimate
power to give a decision on whether you should be given green card or not. However, even
the INS does not have any legal right to distribute green card out of its own goodwill.
Just like I mentioned to you before in your other posting, you should fit in certain
criteria to be eligible to have a shot at the card.

>What avenues are open to someone like me?

Since you have a good job experience, it should be rather easy for you to find an employer
to sponsor you for green card. Either you find an employer or get married to an American
chick. Choice is yours.

>Should I keep working for another 6 before re-assessing it? Try and get a degree in the
>meantime?

If you get a degree, it is to your advantage. Americans are degree freaks. They don't care
if you don't know shit as long as you have a piece of paper as your degree. Go figure!

>(although part time , its gonna be 6 years anyways)

That's worth spending six years. That's your investment and you shall see its fruits later
in life. Look at it that way!

>See an Immigration Lawyer- as they can past stuff, for the right price??

If you don't fit in the qualifying criteria that makes you eligible to apply for green
card, there is nothing a lawyer can do for you.

Enough said...
 
Old Jan 25th 2001, 7:16 pm
  #3  
kiwi
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Wouldnt it be easier and quicker to go for H1B sponsorship rather then a greencard? I do
not have a degree but my work experince got me in with an H1B. If things work out, you
could get your H1B sponsor to go for a green card once you are here or do as I did...find
the woman of your dreams and marry a US citizen. Of course this isnt much help if you are
already married!!

In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
(Apwpronto) wrote:
> "Adrian" [email protected] writes:
> >Hi there, Im 30, have 10 years work experience, and 5 in IT Professionally.
> >
> >Im not degree qualified, however, Im industry certified (CNA, MCSE)
> >
> >I understand someone said that to immigrate, you are required to possess 12 years
> >professional experience or a degree - is this
entirely
> >correct?
>
> You can move your butt in as long as you have breath in your lungs. I
mean, the
> INS doesn't care about professional experience. If you had 100 years
of
> professional experience, the INS wouldn't give you green card without
an
> employer hiring you for your distinct job qualification.
>
> So, your job experience is a plus but doesn't get you the card if your experience
> doesn't get you to find an employer to sponsor you for
green card.
>
> I mean, day in and day out, thousands of Mexicans (border hoppers)
hop over the
> border and immigrate to the U.S. However, they remain as illegal
immigrants.
> Immigrating to the U.S. is just a beginning of a long and tiresome
journey that
> involves dealing with the INS and its relentlessly tiresome screw-ups
for many
> years to come.
>
> Do you think the Nazis were bad? Wait until you deal with the INS.
>
> >does the possession of an MCSE carry any weight (set aside the pros/cons of it, from a
> >technical perspective - im talking from a
Dept of
> >Immigration Perspective)
>
> I think you have a wrong conception of green card entitlement. The
INS holds
> the ultimate power to give a decision on whether you should be given
green card
> or not. However, even the INS does not have any legal right to
distribute green
> card out of its own goodwill. Just like I mentioned to you before in
your other
> posting, you should fit in certain criteria to be eligible to have a
shot at
> the card.
>
> >What avenues are open to someone like me?
>
> Since you have a good job experience, it should be rather easy for
you to find
> an employer to sponsor you for green card. Either you find an
employer or get
> married to an American chick. Choice is yours.
>
> >Should I keep working for another 6 before re-assessing it? Try and get a degree in the
> >meantime?
>
> If you get a degree, it is to your advantage. Americans are degree
freaks. They
> don't care if you don't know shit as long as you have a piece of
paper as your
> degree. Go figure!
>
> >(although part time , its gonna be 6 years anyways)
>
> That's worth spending six years. That's your investment and you shall
see its
> fruits later in life. Look at it that way!
>
> >See an Immigration Lawyer- as they can past stuff, for the right
price??
>
> If you don't fit in the qualifying criteria that makes you eligible
to apply
> for green card, there is nothing a lawyer can do for you.
>
> Enough said...
 
Old Jan 25th 2001, 8:38 pm
  #4  
jeffreyh1
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Adrian,

You want fries with that industry certification?

Regards, JEff there are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots
------------------------------------------------------
In article <[email protected]>,

> Hi there,
>
> Im 30, have 10 years work experience, and 5 in IT Professionally.
>
> Im not degree qualified, however, Im industry certified (CNA, MCSE)
>
> I understand someone said that to immigrate, you are required to
possess
> 12 years professional experience or a degree - is this entirely
correct?
> does the possession of an MCSE carry any weight (set aside the
pros/cons of
> it, from a technical perspective - im talking from a Dept of
Immigration
> Perspective)
>
> What avenues are open to someone like me?
>
> Should I keep working for another 6 before re-assessing it? Try and get a degree in the
> meantime? (although part time , its gonna be 6 years anyways) See an Immigration Lawyer-
> as they can past stuff, for the right
price??
>
> Adrian
>
>

--
 
Old Jan 29th 2001, 12:08 am
  #5  
Adrian
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks apwpronto, thanks Kiwi ...

I guess that means (since Im married) I should find out about the H1B sponsorship (am I
right to suppose then, that they dont have INS classifications on the requirements to
possess a degree or 12years professional experience? - if thats the case, I would be able,
Im sure, to secure work in the US to support my H1B application ...

on Pronto's comment re having 100years worth of experience, its really a catch22 situation
is it not?

I cant get a job (necessarily) until I have
a. a company willing to sponsor me
b. and a job offer

I cant (in my limited knowledge of the INS rules) get a greencard (or immigrate) until I
have satisfied their criteria (which I was told : was 12 years or a BA/BS degree)

so it is the belief, in an effort to clarify then, of some NG participants, that as an
Aussie, provided I can source a company that is interested in
c. hiring me b. sponsoring my (H1B or ...) application --- I should actually be ABLE to at
least get a couple years work over there (and by then, of course, who knows, I may hate
it, or love it, and look at beginning that long arduous process so eloquently
mentioned, moments ago?



Thanks Guys

and as for the French Fry dude - Industry Certification has added 50k to my pay (more than
doubled it) - like McDonalds should say "Some Fries are Better than others"

> Wouldnt it be easier and quicker to go for H1B sponsorship rather then a greencard? I do
> not have a degree but my work experince got me in with an H1B. If things work out, you
> could get your H1B sponsor to go for a green card once you are here or do as I
> did...find the woman of your dreams and marry a US citizen. Of course this isnt much
> help if you are already married!!
>
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
> (Apwpronto) wrote:
> > "Adrian" [email protected] writes:
> > >Hi there, Im 30, have 10 years work experience, and 5 in IT Professionally.
> > >
> > >Im not degree qualified, however, Im industry certified (CNA, MCSE)
> > >
> > >I understand someone said that to immigrate, you are required to possess 12 years
> > >professional experience or a degree - is this
> entirely
> > >correct?
> >
> > You can move your butt in as long as you have breath in your lungs. I
> mean, the
> > INS doesn't care about professional experience. If you had 100 years
> of
> > professional experience, the INS wouldn't give you green card without
> an
> > employer hiring you for your distinct job qualification.
> >
> > So, your job experience is a plus but doesn't get you the card if your experience
> > doesn't get you to find an employer to sponsor you for
> green card.
> >
> > I mean, day in and day out, thousands of Mexicans (border hoppers)
> hop over the
> > border and immigrate to the U.S. However, they remain as illegal
> immigrants.
> > Immigrating to the U.S. is just a beginning of a long and tiresome
> journey that
> > involves dealing with the INS and its relentlessly tiresome screw-ups
> for many
> > years to come.
> >
> > Do you think the Nazis were bad? Wait until you deal with the INS.
> >
> > >does the possession of an MCSE carry any weight (set aside the pros/cons of it, from
> > >a technical perspective - im talking from a
> Dept of
> > >Immigration Perspective)
> >
> > I think you have a wrong conception of green card entitlement. The
> INS holds
> > the ultimate power to give a decision on whether you should be given
> green card
> > or not. However, even the INS does not have any legal right to
> distribute green
> > card out of its own goodwill. Just like I mentioned to you before in
> your other
> > posting, you should fit in certain criteria to be eligible to have a
> shot at
> > the card.
> >
> > >What avenues are open to someone like me?
> >
> > Since you have a good job experience, it should be rather easy for
> you to find
> > an employer to sponsor you for green card. Either you find an
> employer or get
> > married to an American chick. Choice is yours.
> >
> > >Should I keep working for another 6 before re-assessing it? Try and get a degree in
> > >the meantime?
> >
> > If you get a degree, it is to your advantage. Americans are degree
> freaks. They
> > don't care if you don't know shit as long as you have a piece of
> paper as your
> > degree. Go figure!
> >
> > >(although part time , its gonna be 6 years anyways)
> >
> > That's worth spending six years. That's your investment and you shall
> see its
> > fruits later in life. Look at it that way!
> >
> > >See an Immigration Lawyer- as they can past stuff, for the right
> price??
> >
> > If you don't fit in the qualifying criteria that makes you eligible
> to apply
> > for green card, there is nothing a lawyer can do for you.
> >
> > Enough said...
> >
 
Old Jan 29th 2001, 5:24 pm
  #6  
Alistair Bell
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks apwpronto, thanks Kiwi ...
>
> I guess that means (since Im married) I should find out about the H1B sponsorship (am I
> right to suppose then, that they dont have INS classifications
on the
> requirements to possess a degree or 12years professional experience? -
if
> thats the case, I would be able, Im sure, to secure work in the US to support my H1B
> application ...
>
> I cant get a job (necessarily) until I have
> a. a company willing to sponsor me
> b. and a job offer
>
> I cant (in my limited knowledge of the INS rules) get a greencard (or immigrate) until I
> have satisfied their criteria (which I was told :
was 12
> years or a BA/BS degree)
>
> so it is the belief, in an effort to clarify then, of some NG
participants,
> that as an Aussie, provided I can source a company that is interested in
> a. hiring me b. sponsoring my (H1B or ...) application --- I should
actually
> be ABLE to at least get a couple years work over there (and by then, of
course, who
> knows, I may hate it, or love it, and look at beginning that long
arduous
> process so eloquently mentioned, moments ago?

No, the requirement for a degree or 12 years' experience applies to the H-1B too. (And
sadly, although industry certification gives you a better shot at a good job, and
therefore at labor certification for a GC, it doesn't cut any ice in terms of the basic
qualifications for H- 1B status.)

Why not just get a couple more years' experience in Australia, and _then_ move?

--
Alistair

*IMPORTANT NOTE* I am not a lawyer and do not dispense legal advice. For accurate
information, always consult a good immigration attorney.
 
Old Jan 30th 2001, 3:36 am
  #7  
Adrian
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Indeed - looks like I will...

well I have a British Passport anyways, so Ill probably work over there very shortly (and
quite hansomly Im told..) - hey if I work for 6 months and can afford to take up 'a
holiday residence in the US for 6 months at a time' would the US Gov be up for that? (and
spend my British Pounds over there?surely thats good no?)



Thanks Man...

> In article <[email protected]>,

> > Thanks apwpronto, thanks Kiwi ...
> >
> > I guess that means (since Im married) I should find out about the H1B sponsorship (am
> > I right to suppose then, that they dont have INS classifications
> on the
> > requirements to possess a degree or 12years professional experience? -
> if
> > thats the case, I would be able, Im sure, to secure work in the US to support my H1B
> > application ...
> >
> > I cant get a job (necessarily) until I have
> > a. a company willing to sponsor me
> > b. and a job offer
> >
> > I cant (in my limited knowledge of the INS rules) get a greencard (or immigrate) until
> > I have satisfied their criteria (which I was told :
> was 12
> > years or a BA/BS degree)
> >
> > so it is the belief, in an effort to clarify then, of some NG
> participants,
> > that as an Aussie, provided I can source a company that is interested in
> > a. hiring me b. sponsoring my (H1B or ...) application --- I should
> actually
> > be ABLE to at least get a couple years work over there (and by then, of
> course, who
> > knows, I may hate it, or love it, and look at beginning that long
> arduous
> > process so eloquently mentioned, moments ago?
>
> No, the requirement for a degree or 12 years' experience applies to the H-1B too. (And
> sadly, although industry certification gives you a better shot at a good job, and
> therefore at labor certification for a GC, it doesn't cut any ice in terms of the basic
> qualifications for H- 1B status.)
>
> Why not just get a couple more years' experience in Australia, and _then_ move?
>
> --
> Alistair
>
> *IMPORTANT NOTE* I am not a lawyer and do not dispense legal advice. For accurate
> information, always consult a good immigration attorney.
 

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