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Serving in the U.S. Military

Serving in the U.S. Military

Old Apr 4th 2022, 10:22 pm
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Default Serving in the U.S. Military

I'm curious as to whether there are other ex pats like myself who were drafted into the U.S. Military.
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Old Apr 4th 2022, 10:29 pm
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

It used to be quite common; and it didn’t matter if one’s residence was lawful or not. I recall that when I was in Reception for my Army Basic Combat Training (during the Vietnam War), all non-citizens were directed to fall out to be processed for naturalization.

Do note that it’s been 49 yeas since conscription was ended in the United States.

(In answer to your question, I am a natural born U.S. Citizen).
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Old Apr 4th 2022, 10:43 pm
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

Originally Posted by S Folinsky View Post
It used to be quite common; and it didn’t matter if one’s residence was lawful or not. I recall that when I was in Reception for my Army Basic Combat Training (during the Vietnam War), all non-citizens were directed to fall out to be processed for naturalization.

Do note that it’s been 49 yeas since conscription was ended in the United States.

(In answer to your question, I am a natural born U.S. Citizen).
I was drafted in 1967 as a Green Card holder. We were not "directed to fall out to be processed for naturalization" that was a choice. A choice I took when I was in Vietnam. A whole plane load of "aliens" flew to Hawaii for naturalization.

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Old Apr 5th 2022, 3:01 am
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

Originally Posted by David Layne View Post
I was drafted in 1967 as a Green Card holder. We were not "directed to fall out to be processed for naturalization" that was a choice. A choice I took when I was in Vietnam. A whole plane load of "aliens" flew to Hawaii for naturalization.
I started BCT in November 1970 at Ft Campbell. As an impressionable 20 year old (soon to be 21), many vignettes from reception stick in the mind. My mother was a naturalized citizen as were all four grandparents, so I guess I was attuned to that order. I would assume that the non-citizen soldiers were given the option of naturalization, but I wasn’t in the room. My brother told me he didn’t see that at Ft Ord in 1969.

My entire service was in CONUS. First time in Vietnam was as a tourist in 2009.
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Old Apr 6th 2022, 7:16 pm
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

I did 33 years in military (natural born citizen) and the military seems to be a smooth path to citizenship. When we had two major bases in the Philippines part of the agreement was to accept a certain number of Filipinos into US military with direct path to citizenship. It was very competitive with some highly qualified individuals accepted. Many made careers and quickly rose in the ranks. At first they were limited in career fields available but that changed later. The Navy especially is flush with high ranking Filipino enlisted.
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Old Apr 13th 2022, 2:42 am
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

Originally Posted by S Folinsky View Post
It used to be quite common; and it didn’t matter if one’s residence was lawful or not. I recall that when I was in Reception for my Army Basic Combat Training (during the Vietnam War), all non-citizens were directed to fall out to be processed for naturalization.

Do note that it’s been 49 yeas since conscription was ended in the United States.

(In answer to your question, I am a natural born U.S. Citizen).
Trying to understand this - Being drafted was a direct path to citizenship regardless of prior immigration status?
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Old Apr 13th 2022, 8:14 am
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

Originally Posted by tom169 View Post
Trying to understand this - Being drafted was a direct path to citizenship regardless of prior immigration status?
The case Gallarde v INS may be of interest. I am familiar with the case and find it interesting that the Court disregarded legal authority that the naturalization bar did not apply if there had been military service for a NATO military. The US is a NATO member. Also, the underlying record in Gallarde included extensive medical evidence that he was, in fact, no longer able to safely perform his duties on the deck of an aircraft carrier.
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Old Jun 14th 2022, 11:11 pm
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

As a Brit who just got out of the U.S military a few years ago after serving 10 years this thread is absolutely fascinating.
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I

Last edited by tempscape; Jun 14th 2022 at 11:16 pm.
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Old Jun 15th 2022, 1:05 am
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

[QUOTE=tempscape;13121919]As a Brit who just got out of the U.S military a few years ago after serving 10 years this thread is absolutely fascinating.
What was your experience regarding permanent resident/citizenship issues? Was citizenship offered earlier/easier than normal? After ten years did you consider reserves to get a retirement? My retirement as a reservist is a very valuable asset in total retirement picture.
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Old Jun 15th 2022, 2:14 am
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

I waa offered citizenship during BCT (boot camp) but declined as I was already through most of the process of obtaining it through my partner. It would have been WAY cheaper to have done it through the military though.
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The biggest reasons for most of the people joining when I did was citizenship or military paid college. ​​The citizenship process for them was extremely swift. Less than a year. My route was 2 years.

No, that wasn't on my list of options. Military life stopped giving me that buzz.
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Last edited by tempscape; Jun 15th 2022 at 2:16 am.
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Old Jun 15th 2022, 2:51 am
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Default Re: Serving in the U.S. Military

Originally Posted by tempscape View Post
I waa offered citizenship during BCT (boot camp) but declined as I was already through most of the process of obtaining it through my partner. It would have been WAY cheaper to have done it through the military though.
​​​​​
The biggest reasons for most of the people joining when I did was citizenship or military paid college. ​​The citizenship process for them was extremely swift. Less than a year. My route was 2 years.

No, that wasn't on my list of options. Military life stopped giving me that buzz.
​​​​
I joined for the GI bill college benefits and used them to the max. Never intended to retire but the reserves appealed to me and my retirement benefit will be near two million depending on how long I live to collect.
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