British Expats

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-   -   Post EU Referendum (https://britishexpats.com/forum/take-outside-67/post-eu-referendum-879308/)

amideislas Feb 23rd 2017 11:54 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Bipat (Post 12187742)
Difficult to immediately analyse, I suppose loss of -- independence, individuality, own justice system, ability to rebel etc. etc.

Well, it seems last year, there was a referendum to leave the EU. And after a few months of precisely that type of fear campaigning, you won by a narrow margin. So, OK. leave. That's what you voted for.

But again, why would a "federal Europe" represent a threat? Should that ever come to pass, it would be of astronomical benefit to Britain, whether a member or not. The opposite, however (a failed EU), actually does represent a tangible, substantial threat.

Or is it just your nationalist ideology that fuels your "alarm"?

Dick Dasterdly Feb 23rd 2017 12:00 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
Unpayable debts and an existential EU financial crisis - are eurozone central banks still solvent?

amideislas Feb 23rd 2017 12:04 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
Eurozone economy quietly outshines the US

Donald Trump’s plans to boost the US growth rate may be getting plenty of attention — but it is the eurozone economy that is quietly exceeding expectations.


Figures for business sentiment, growth rates and unemployment for the single currency area have all provided positive surprises during the start of this year, as business confidence proves resilient despite Britain’s vote to leave the EU. The eurozone economy has now posted 14 consecutive quarters of growth, the unemployment rate has returned into single digits, and economic sentiment has reached its highest level in six years.

The numbers contrast with common depictions of the eurozone economy as stagnant, sclerotic and perennially underperforming. “I certainly continue to be amazed by the skewed negativism towards Europe,” says Erik Nielsen, chief economist of UniCredit, who says such views are “mostly based on what seems like superficial attention to the data — or, maybe, to ‘alternative facts’ .”

In fact, job creation for the eurozone accelerated to a near nine-year record in January, while the rate of output growth maintained a 5½-year high.
And expectedly, comes the inevitable demonisation of the EU for exhibiting any success:

The new US administration has opened up a new front against Europe, accusing Germany of unfairly profiting from the “grossly undervalued” euro. Peter Navarro, who heads up Donald Trump’s new National Trade Council, made the comments in an FT interview today.
The comments sent the euro spiking; it’s now at its highest level since November.


Oddly, though, no such sentiments about the "grossly undervalued Pound". The worst performing currency of 2016.
Apparently, Europe's success is far more threatening than ... erm... what's that island off the coast of Europe again?

Lion in Winter Feb 23rd 2017 12:13 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by amideislas (Post 12187764)
Eurozone economy quietly outshines the US

Donald Trump’s plans to boost the US growth rate may be getting plenty of attention — but it is the eurozone economy that is quietly exceeding expectations.

Let's see, which publication is most likely to have reliable financial information, the Express or the Financial Times?

Bipat Feb 23rd 2017 12:19 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by amideislas (Post 12187757)
Well, it seems last year, there was a referendum to leave the EU. And after a few months of precisely that type of fear campaigning, you won by a narrow margin. So, OK. leave. That's what you voted for.

But again, why would a "federal Europe" represent a threat? Should that ever come to pass, it would be of astronomical benefit to Britain, whether a member or not. The opposite, however (a failed EU), actually does represent a tangible, substantial threat.

Or is it just your nationalist ideology that fuels your "alarm"?

Not a federal Europe or EU, I would fear UK being part of it. As you have said it is not going to happen (at least Europe), there possibly might be a federal EU.
Nationalistic ideology or just patriotism/pride in your country (regardless of past negatives!), why do we love our own parents--in spite of their faults!

amideislas Feb 23rd 2017 12:22 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Bipat (Post 12187783)
Not a federal Europe or EU, I would fear UK being part of it. As you have said it is not going to happen (at least Europe), there possibly might be a federal EU.
Nationalistic ideology or just patriotism/pride in your country (regardless of past negatives!), why do we love our own parents--in spite of their faults!

Well you don't have to, and never did. But I appreciate your fears. And thanks, by the way, for the validation. :thumbsup:

DigitalGhost Feb 23rd 2017 12:26 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by amideislas (Post 12187734)
Well, that sounds pretty "democratic". I wonder how Australia and Canada feel about being subservient to an "unelected" foreign "head of state". Perhaps they should "take back control"?

They don't seem to mind. It's a figurehead thing only and they have full control over their own democratic process and countries. They could abandon the Queen whenever they like but they have so far elected not to do so.

amideislas Feb 23rd 2017 12:30 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12187792)
They don't seem to mind. It's a figurehead thing only and they have full control over their own democratic process and countries. They could abandon the Queen whenever they like but they have so far elected not to do so.

So, would that mean they're "corrupt, failing piles of horse doo-doo" or anything like that?

DigitalGhost Feb 23rd 2017 12:31 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Bipat (Post 12187783)
Not a federal Europe or EU, I would fear UK being part of it. As you have said it is not going to happen (at least Europe), there possibly might be a federal EU.
Nationalistic ideology or just patriotism/pride in your country (regardless of past negatives!), why do we love our own parents--in spite of their faults!

Dependent upon what happens over the course of this year with the French and German elections, I think we could see a move towards federalism in Europe. They already share a common border, currency and relations with the outside world and have been looking at establishing a common military for some time.

If the far right don't achieve a strong position of power in those two countries and with the EU's most powerful half-member out of the way thanks to Brexit, the idea of a newly formed 'USE' isn't entirely unrealistic.

DigitalGhost Feb 23rd 2017 12:35 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by amideislas (Post 12187797)
So, would that mean they're "corrupt, failing piles of horse doo-doo" or anything like that?

Australia seems to be more vocal about it than Canada but the truth is that I think they like having the UK on their side. Especially with Canada because it really pisses the Americans off.

If you cross the border over the Peace Bridge then there are portraits of the Queen decorating the walls at the Canadian checkpoint. You rarely see them anywhere else in Canada from my experience and I'm sure they only have them there to stick the boot in.

amideislas Feb 23rd 2017 12:38 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12187801)
If you cross the border over the Peace Bridge then there are portraits of the Queen decorating the walls at the Canadian checkpoint. You rarely see them anywhere else in Canada from my experience and I'm sure they only have them there to stick the boot in.

Who dat?

http://advisoranalyst.advisoranalyst.../10/can201.jpg

DigitalGhost Feb 23rd 2017 12:40 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by amideislas (Post 12187804)

Except for those portraits obviously. :rofl:

Red Eric Feb 23rd 2017 2:01 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Dick Dasterdly (Post 12187741)

I notice that the Express didn't actually manage to attribute the idea of the EU being panic-stricken to Sir Ivan in the article itself and in fact, reading his remarks, he merely stated the obvious ie that if the UK leaves the EU before 2020, the budget (which was agreed in 2014, I think) would have a shortfall. Hence the so-called "divorce bill", which will entail the UK stumping up a fair share, even if not the full amount, of what it had already committed to contribute by dint of being a member. The carrot, of course, is that ignoring all the populist crap in the Express and in here, the UK does still want certain things from the EU.

Of course, it won't have escaped the EU's attention that one of the chief things the UK says it doesn't want, is to have to contribute large sums of money in return for that. So guess what will be number one item on the list of things the UK must accept? That's right - a big bill :lol:

Anyway, here's a bit more from Sir Ivan, who sounds like an eminently sensible chap, so I'm very pleased he's now on the Express roll of honour : Brexit talks could get 'gory, bitter and twisted', says former ambassador

amideislas Feb 23rd 2017 2:12 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
This just in:

Apparently, German filmmakers are producing a Sci-Fi feature film about a futuristic post-Brexit Britain.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hpS7bOJjp...inselaffen.jpg

Since this obviously qualifies as a laughable farce, I'm a bit surprised the Express hasn't run a front page article about it.

Lion in Winter Feb 23rd 2017 2:24 pm

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Red Eric (Post 12187881)
I notice that the Express didn't actually manage to attribute the idea of the EU being panic-stricken to Sir Ivan in the article itself and in fact, reading his remarks, he merely stated the obvious ie that if the UK leaves the EU before 2020, the budget (which was agreed in 2014, I think) would have a shortfall. Hence the so-called "divorce bill", which will entail the UK stumping up a fair share, even if not the full amount, of what it had already committed to contribute by dint of being a member. The carrot, of course, is that ignoring all the populist crap in the Express and in here, the UK does still want certain things from the EU.

Of course, it won't have escaped the EU's attention that one of the chief things the UK says it doesn't want, is to have to contribute large sums of money in return for that. So guess what will be number one item on the list of things the UK must accept? That's right - a big bill :lol:

Anyway, here's a bit more from Sir Ivan, who sounds like an eminently sensible chap, so I'm very pleased he's now on the Express roll of honour : Brexit talks could get 'gory, bitter and twisted', says former ambassador


Eric, you really must stop actually reading the articles and drawing sensible conclusions. Such behavior is likely to make you an elite and an enemy of the people.


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