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-   -   Post EU Referendum (https://britishexpats.com/forum/take-outside-67/post-eu-referendum-879308/)

EMR Jan 11th 2017 11:09 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12148943)
So in other words those people aided criminal activity. Polish and German Jews were not at immediate threat of mass execution in 1939 so there was no need to break the law at that time.

Also that is still beside the point as Syrians still aren't at threat of extermination now. The situation in Syria is not in any way similar to the holocaust and you know it. That's just a petty and cheap trump card that your lot try to play when they are losing in a discussion and have nothing else left to bring to the table.


Ypur ignorane of history for someone who claims to have a degree is disturbing.
But it does explain a lot..

If you think the situation in Syrua has changed why not move there. With your views Assad will welcome you with open arms.
He would probably pay for your travel and relocation costs and find you a job in his propoganda department.

DigitalGhost Jan 11th 2017 11:17 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by EMR (Post 12148954)
If you think the situation in Syrua has changed why not move there. With your views Assad will welcome you with open arms.
He would probably pay for your travel and relocation costs and find you a job in his propoganda department.

I don't think he would. For one thing I am not of the Muslim faith.

Incidentally, criticising or questioning my educational background when you can barely string together a coherent sentence in written English really is a bit much.

EMR Jan 11th 2017 11:25 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12148961)
I don't think he would. For one thing I am not of the Muslim faith.

Incidentally, criticising or questioning my educational background when you can barely string together a coherent sentence in written English really is a bit much.

Again show your lack of knowledge. Assad belongs to a moderate sect of Islam and is supported by a large % of the christian community one of the largest in the middle east.
I am not claimg to have a degree unlike you which was subsidised by the UK taxpayer including contributions from the millions of taxpaying immigrants in the UK.

morpeth Jan 11th 2017 11:25 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Lion in Winter (Post 12148289)
There is a huge population that is not comfortable at all. Wealth inequality is appalling, worse than the UK for sure, and the infant mortality rate is worse than pretty much every other developed nation by a long way. It's worse than Cuba's. Until Obamacare, 20 million people had no access to health insurance at all. Voter apathy is high. Why? People don't see how what their government does is related to them at all, and mainstream media won't tell them either.

Good post ! Regardless of what one may think of Obama overall, Obamacare did benefit millions. It has a lot of flaws, but those who have medical care who didn't before benefitted directly because of his actions.

On the economic front the inequality in America shown in stagnant wages and the poor economic situation for millions, a trend of the last twenty years at least, will lead to more apathy or more votes for politicians who would have been unelectable on decades past. Unfortunately the politicians - when the can agree- just tinker with the system instead of finding bold new policies.

Dick Dasterdly Jan 11th 2017 11:30 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 
Remoaners v Reality.

I feel genuinely sorry for the Remoaners. It must be a thoroughly miserable experience.

First you lose a referendum that your Remain mates told you was in the bag, then you spend months living in even greater misery,
refusing to accept the result, droning on about the idiocy of your countrymen.

There are five stages of grief: .......denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.

Most Remoaners are stuck at denial.


But while they refuse to accept that the world is changing,
the rest of us are getting on with shaping the future. :thumbup:

Scamp Jan 11th 2017 11:41 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Dick Dasterdly (Post 12148972)
Remoaners v Reality.

I feel genuinely sorry for the Remoaners. It must be a thoroughly miserable experience.

First you lose a referendum that your Remain mates told you was in the bag, then you spend months living in even greater misery,
refusing to accept the result, droning on about the idiocy of your countrymen.

There are five stages of grief: .......denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.

Most Remoaners are stuck at denial.


But while they refuse to accept that the world is changing,
the rest of us are getting on with shaping the future. :thumbup:

I wish I lived in your world sometimes.

It must be wonderful to just pass through life oblivious to anything other than what you think. Willfully ignorant of this and that because it doesn't fit your daydreams.

It's almost like you're a child, with no responsibility, no cares, no concern for anything grown up.

You're a child and the Express if your Beano. :nod:
Or maybe that's a bit advanced, when I do some research this seems more like you:

2 years
Able to run. Walks up and down stairs 2 feet per step.
Builds tower of 6 cubes
Joins 2–3 words in sentences

(Source)

DigitalGhost Jan 11th 2017 11:43 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by EMR (Post 12148968)
Again show your lack of knowledge. Assad belongs to a moderate sect of Islam and is supported by a large % of the christian community one of the largest in the middle east.
I am not claimg to have a degree unlike you which was subsidised by the UK taxpayer including contributions from the millions of taxpaying immigrants in the UK.

The UK tax payer didn't subsidise my degree. I paid for my tuition fees myself and studied part-time as well as holding down a full-time job so that I could afford it.

In any case, I have no children and almost never use the NHS so I guess you could say that if any subsidies did go towards my higher education then they were funded from my own tax contributions anyway as well as the ridiculously high level of taxes paid by my UK-resident parents.

Go on, carry on taking cheap shots at me and I'll continue to fire them straight back.

DigitalGhost Jan 11th 2017 11:46 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by morpeth (Post 12148969)
Good post ! Regardless of what one may think of Obama overall, Obamacare did benefit millions. It has a lot of flaws, but those who have medical care who didn't before benefitted directly because of his actions.

On the economic front the inequality in America shown in stagnant wages and the poor economic situation for millions, a trend of the last twenty years at least, will lead to more apathy or more votes for politicians who would have been unelectable on decades past. Unfortunately the politicians - when the can agree- just tinker with the system instead of finding bold new policies.

For those of you living in the US, is Trump's plan to repeal ObamaCare now that he is days away from being in office?

It's hard to find any real news on what is going on in American politics from the British press at the moment because they are all still so fixated on how much they hate him to publish anything genuinely informative.

DaveLovesDee Jan 11th 2017 11:46 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12148892)
That wouldn't happen because you would never get the numbers of people meeting the visa qualification criteria to match those currently entering from Europe.

But as those entering from the EU are also creating jobs, as seen by the 3% drop in UK unemployed numbers, wouldn't a visa system drive those job creators to other EU countries instead? Creating more UK unemployment.

[/QUOTE]As I have said time and time again, those supposed obligations do not exist. They are a figment of a collective neo-liberal imagination.[/QUOTE]

The United Nations

The EU


Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12148940)
You assess based on whether or not that skill can be found on the UK market first and then allow a foreign hire if it can't. If an area of skills shortage is noticed then you encourage training, education and development in that area.

If I want to hire someone skilled, I'd look for candidates who are EU nationals (including Brits, because we are EU nationals too) first, because UK and other EU nationals can start as soon as I hire them.

If I want to hire a non-EU national (or an EU national needed a work visa), I'd have to become a licensed sponsor through the Home Office, and the successful candidate would have to apply for a Tier 2 work visa (with no guarantee of getting it). And I'd have still had to advertise the job to UK nationals beforehand.

I believe the Home Office only issues a certain number of work visas per month (x), so if you're applicant (x+1) you've wasted your £600 application fee, and I've wasted 3+ months waiting for an employee I could have had actually working.

[quote]Create a system that functions like US H1-B or how the Canadian quotas worked prior to the introduction of EE and I am sure that you will solve a lot of your problems. [quote]

Ah, you're an immigration specialist. Everything's clearer now.

You should apply to work at the Home Office, or become a politician.


If the NHS can only hire 1,000 foreign nurses per year then they might start to take education and training programs a bit more seriously.
2012 - 'Disaster' warning follows 12% drop in nurse training places

2016 - Health chiefs warn of 'reckless’ cuts in student nurse funding

The NHS would love to train more nurses, but if the student funding isn't available, then less people get trained. The government then comes up with 'nursing on the cheap' to save costs, by employing Healthcare Assistants to do much of the work previously done by nurses. This does free up nurses to manage the increased paperwork they now have, and the increased duties they've been required to take on. But a HA is not a nurse, and patients don't always understand this (and get annoyed when they see a uniform, but have to wait while the HA goes to get a nurse to deal with the patient).

These HA's are pretty much the same as care Assistants working in Residential homes.

Scamp Jan 11th 2017 11:49 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12148981)
It's hard to find any real news on what is going on in American politics from the British press at the moment because they are all still so fixated on how much they hate him to publish anything genuinely informative.

I dunno, the stories about the wall and the back-tracking are pretty informative. :rofl:

DaveLovesDee Jan 11th 2017 11:49 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12148979)
In any case, I have no children and almost never use the NHS so I guess you could say that if any subsidies did go towards my higher education then they were funded from my own tax contributions anyway as well as the ridiculously high level of taxes paid by my UK-resident parents.

I guess your parents are high earners then. They could always move to another EU country with a lower tax rate. Malta was nice.

DigitalGhost Jan 11th 2017 11:53 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DaveLovesDee (Post 12148982)
But as those entering from the EU are also creating jobs, as seen by the 3% drop in UK unemployed numbers, wouldn't a visa system drive those job creators to other EU countries instead? Creating more UK unemployment.

As I have said time and time again, those supposed obligations do not exist. They are a figment of a collective neo-liberal imagination.[/QUOTE]

The United Nations

The EU



If I want to hire someone skilled, I'd look for candidates who are EU nationals (including Brits, because we are EU nationals too) first, because UK and other EU nationals can start as soon as I hire them.

If I want to hire a non-EU national (or an EU national needed a work visa), I'd have to become a licensed sponsor through the Home Office, and the successful candidate would have to apply for a Tier 2 work visa (with no guarantee of getting it). And I'd have still had to advertise the job to UK nationals beforehand.

I believe the Home Office only issues a certain number of work visas per month (x), so if you're applicant (x+1) you've wasted your £600 application fee, and I've wasted 3+ months waiting for an employee I could have had actually working.

[quote]Create a system that functions like US H1-B or how the Canadian quotas worked prior to the introduction of EE and I am sure that you will solve a lot of your problems.


Ah, you're an immigration specialist. Everything's clearer now.

You should apply to work at the Home Office, or become a politician.



2012 - 'Disaster' warning follows 12% drop in nurse training places

2016 - Health chiefs warn of 'reckless’ cuts in student nurse funding

The NHS would love to train more nurses, but if the student funding isn't available, then less people get trained. The government then comes up with 'nursing on the cheap' to save costs, by employing Healthcare Assistants to do much of the work previously done by nurses. This does free up nurses to manage the increased paperwork they now have, and the increased duties they've been required to take on. But a HA is not a nurse, and patients don't always understand this (and get annoyed when they see a uniform, but have to wait while the HA goes to get a nurse to deal with the patient).

These HA's are pretty much the same as care Assistants working in Residential homes.
There is still government funding for nursing programs at universities for EU citizens. Teaching and nursing are two of the very few areas where students can still get their education entirely, if not almost entirely, covered for them.

I'm sorry but I don't see anything wrong with the hiring and visa system that you mentioned related to non-EU recruits. Recruiting from outside the EU should be absolutely discouraged as much as possible and the government have a duty to make it as difficult as possible for employers to do that. After Brexit that will probably change to include hiring Europeans as well which, to be fair, is exactly as it should be.

Are Europeans creating large numbers of jobs for British workers? I'm not really sure that they are. I'm fairly confident that if you really looked into it then for every Easyjet that to be fair does recruit from the UK workforce, there will be 1000 Polish delicatessens that only hire their own people due to language or cultural requirements.

DigitalGhost Jan 11th 2017 11:56 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DaveLovesDee (Post 12148986)
I guess your parents are high earners then. They could always move to another EU country with a lower tax rate. Malta was nice.

Not particularly. They earn a decent living wage and work hard for it. If they did retire overseas, which I don't think they intend to do, then it would probably be outside of the EU anyway since the Euro has made retiring in the likes of Spain or Portugal prohibitively expensive and non-cost effective these days.

Fredbargate Jan 11th 2017 11:57 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by DigitalGhost (Post 12148882)
I don't think that he has ever said that. Like me, Dick has said that he believes in positive skills-based immigration and an equal system for handling all non-British citizens.

That's not closing off your borders and your minds. That is acting sensibly.


Originally Posted by Bipat (Post 12148883)
Perhaps the xenophobics are those that think the world consists of the EU members or even just Europe.
There is a big wide world out there and the majority of it is not a member of the EU. The ignorance about people outside of Europe and free movement of the EU members rather than an equal immigration policy for immigrants from worldwide is a danger for the future.

Maybe that is about to change?

A few minutes ago I posted the following on the Spanish forum


Originally Posted by Fredbargate (Post 12148988)
Tighter EU border controls to be introduced in March will require systematic document checks for everyone crossing a Schengen border, including the one between Gibraltar and Spain.

The amendment to the Schengen Border Code was first proposed in the wake of terrorist attacks in 2015 and finally approved by the European Parliament and the European Commission last December after months of discussion.

It requires travel documents to be checked against relevant databases for all people entering or exiting the Schengen area.

The UK and Gibraltar are not part of Schengen and officials here do not intend to apply any additional checks or controls, and have no obligation to do so.

Schengen changes will bring tighter border controls – Gibraltar Chronicle

The UK is also not in Schengen so how will it affect people entering and leaving the UK heading to or from Europe?


DigitalGhost Jan 11th 2017 11:58 am

Re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Scamp (Post 12148985)
I dunno, the stories about the wall and the back-tracking are pretty informative. :rofl:

Tbh, he is a very clever man for convincing large numbers of the American voting public that he could ever pull anything like that off. Without major changes to US immigration legislation you couldn't, for example, ban an entire religion of people from entering your country based on religious beliefs alone. There was no precedent for that and it just didn't make any sense.


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