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-   -   Post EU Referendum (https://britishexpats.com/forum/take-outside-67/post-eu-referendum-879308/)

SultanOfSwing Aug 19th 2016 3:53 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Bipat (Post 12030250)
Could it be cost? I read Telegraph--on line, but too mean to buy it when in UK. OH buys Sunday Times, not daily.
Occasionally buy Racing Post if there when its Cheltenham festival time!!

Part of it might be cost, I suppose. A more worrying one might be the percentage of the 1.8 million Sun readers who actually believe what's in it.

amideislas Aug 19th 2016 3:56 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 
Bipat, the UK voted to leave because it doesn't want to anything more than a "trade agreement", no free movement, no rules, just trade. Well, buying stuff mostly, because it hasn't all that much to sell.

So, presuming the UK does indeed leave the EU, it shall have precisely that. A lot of people love living in the channel islands, and Britain will be the biggest among them. What's wrong with that?

Lion in Winter Aug 19th 2016 4:36 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Bipat (Post 12030246)
The EEC was an economic community. I presume all members had common goals. However UK law was supreme and there was no discrimination as to who could work, settle, live in the country, but as you say you need people who "function" in the same way"---!?

Why are work visas (which the majority of other countries have --be incompatible with an economic community?)

The official leave campaign was making the same point from the outset, unfortunately many are/were influenced by Farage who was not of the official 'leave campaign'.

You just want something different from what the EU actually is. That's all. There isn't anything to argue about.

It remains to be seen how different it will actually be for the UK in the end.

DaveLovesDee Aug 19th 2016 5:13 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by Bipat (Post 12030246)
The EEC was an economic community. I presume all members had common goals. However UK law was supreme and there was no discrimination as to who could work, settle, live in the country, but as you say you need people who "function" in the same way"---!?

The EU is based on the four pillars that all members and those who want to join agree to. Unfortunately, ine of those members wanted to cherry-pick which pillars applied to it. It negotiated as many opt-outs as it could, but these weren't enough, so it threatened to leave.

The public bought into the lies they were told by politicians and the media, and voted to leave in a non-binding referendum. Now, the government is in a catch-22 situation.

Should they follow the will expressed by the majority of those who voted, it will destabilse the UK for an unknown period. If they ignore the vote, they'll likely lose the next election.


Why are work visas (which the majority of other countries have --be incompatible with an economic community?)
Because the agreement between those countries removes any visa requirements between those who signed it.


The official leave campaign was making the same point from the outset, unfortunately many are/were influenced by Farage who was not of the official 'leave campaign'.
The official Leave campaign and their media friends could easily have very clearly and repeatedly told the public that Farage does not represent their campaign, but instead used Farage as a stalking horse to push the Leave campaign forward. Then when the campaign had been won, it was then realised by those who Farage targeted that he actually had no power to do anything he said.

TGA Aug 19th 2016 6:57 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 
omg the anger!!:rofl:

embrace, build a bridge, get over it (brexit)

I haven't met anyone (in the real world) that regrets brexit or has suffered because of it (apart from the lefty bremainers and their mass dummy spit)

mfesharne Aug 19th 2016 8:18 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 
The dire warnings that have failed to appear EIGHT WEEKS after the Brexit vote | Daily Mail Online

bwahahahahaha!

DaveLovesDee Aug 19th 2016 8:25 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by TGA (Post 12030361)
I haven't met anyone (in the real world) that regrets brexit or has suffered because of it (apart from the lefty bremainers and their mass dummy spit)

I'm unsure how anyone can regret or suffer the effects of brexit when brexit hasn't happened yet.

As for the lefty bremainers and their dummy spits, I think there's been enough of the dummy spits on both sides.

DaveLovesDee Aug 19th 2016 8:29 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 
EU Referendum Leave U-turns On Immigration, NHS And ‘Taking Our Country Back’

amideislas Aug 19th 2016 8:49 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by TGA (Post 12030361)
omg the anger!!:rofl:

embrace, build a bridge, get over it (brexit)

I haven't met anyone (in the real world) that regrets brexit or has suffered because of it (apart from the lefty bremainers and their mass dummy spit)

An awful lot of people are just like you. Don't even realise there has been no "brexit". Many thought it's already been done and dusted. Apparently, feeling so free now liberated from EU shackles, much like the feeling of freedom you get when you use fairy liquid or Vodafone pay as you go.

But the markets know the reality, and just looking at the numbers, realise it's unlikely the UK will commit economic suicide anytime soon, so... Business as usual. For now anyway, at least until there's some indication of how the UK might move forward on this (or not).

la mancha Aug 19th 2016 9:19 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by amideislas (Post 12030422)
An awful lot of people are just like you. Don't even realise there has been no "brexit". Many thought it's already been done and dusted. Apparently, feeling so free now liberated from EU shackles, much like the feeling of freedom you get when you use fairy liquid or Vodafone pay as you go.

But the markets know the reality, and just looking at the numbers, realise it's unlikely the UK will commit economic suicide anytime soon, so... Business as usual. For now anyway, at least until there's some indication of how the UK might move forward on this (or not).

I have always maintained I would like to see the UK leave the EU with an amicable agreement. I have always said that if Brexit means the UK goes into long-term recession and unemployment rises this will also pull in European nations and will have a devastating effect on those Eurozone economies which are still struggling with the crisis of eight years ago. I have always said there has to be a compromise, or trade-offs, to reach that amicable agreement, not only for the good of all nations but for the good of 500 million people. Does that answer your question?

You say Britain needs Europe more than Europe needs Britain. Once again you still do not understand the damage that European nations will suffer with a bad Brexit. We need each other equally to reach an amicable solution. Do not confuse the EU with Europe. European nations do need Britain. Whether the EU does is another matter but they will not count when the ministers of European nations come to vote on the intricacies of Brexit.

Your post 1698 says nothing new. But I did not see any mention of the damage that could be caused to European nations in that post, because in the case of a bad Brexit damage there most certainly will be, especially across the Eurozone. Britain will be given a special status when leaving the EU simply because if it is not an amicable divorce the result will be too terrifying to contemplate, especially for the indebted Eurozone nations. You have failed to answer my previous posts on the consequences for the Eurozone of the UK going into long-term recession because of a bad Brexit. What are your thoughts on that?

You have not answered my comments on less funding going into the EU in the case of a recession across Europe and a downturn in individual nations’ wealth as a result of a bad Brexit, so starving nations like Poland and Spain of much needed EU funding for their public services. What are your thoughts on that?

In the case of a bad Brexit there will be new unemployment in the UK. EU migrant workers will leave. Where do you think they will go? Polish workers will not go back to Poland as there is still a lot of unemployment there and they also have an influx of cheap Ukranian workers, and have had for some time. They will go to France, maybe, but France also has an unemployment problem and will not take too kindly a new influx of Polish workers seeking work. The answer is to go to Germany to find work. With freedom of movement will Germany be able to absorb them and will it cause animosity amongst Germans?

With a bad Brexit and a recession throughout Europe where will new EU migrant workers go to find work? Not to the UK, but to Germany. With freedom of movement how many more can Germany take in?

With a bad Brexit how many EU migrant workers in the UK will simply decide they have had enough and go back to their native country, so adding another burden to their home nation’s already strained public services, with cuts in EU funding for these services and even more unemployment. What are your thoughts on that?

Many jobs (millions?) in Britain rely on exports to the EU. An equal number of jobs across the EU, and in particular the Eurozone, rely on exports to the UK. How will a bad Brexit affect European nations’ exports to the UK? How will those citizens affected by new redundancies in Eurozone nations react because of a downturn in exports to Britain?

There are so many factors involved for both sides but to think there is nothing over that EU border and we will fall off the edge of the Earth when we cross it is stupid.

Your take is from the UK’s side but I like to look at all sides. Brexit is not only about money and trade: it is also about individual nations and people. That is why there will be trade-offs to reach an amicable solution.

Your enthusiasm on how things will be for the UK with a bad Brexit, as in your comment, ‘A lot of people love living in the channel islands, and Britain will be the biggest among them. What's wrong with that?’ completely fails to take into account the catastrophe awaiting the EU, and Eurozone nations in particular, if that happens. Be careful what you wish for.

You, more than anyone else on BE, have a special zeal (I don't know why) to see the worse for the UK. Tell me if I am wrong? Tell me you want to see a successful Brexit for the UK. Tell me you want to see a successful EU and UK work together for an amicable result for both sides to go on working side by side with the UK out of the Union so that all Europeans can benefit.

Your stupidity in thinking the UK will commit economic suicide and at the same time your naivety in not coming to terms with the damage that will cause throughout Europe portrays your posts as senseless.

amideislas Aug 19th 2016 9:25 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 
You might consider a bit less coffee, manch.

johnwoo Aug 19th 2016 9:32 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by amideislas (Post 12030444)
You might consider a bit less coffee, manch.

I think he/they have been drinking the Kool aid.

la mancha Aug 19th 2016 9:36 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by amideislas (Post 12030444)
You might consider a bit less coffee, manch.

Exactly what I expect from you. For you and any others who found it too long, I’m sorry if it went over a couple of paragraphs and diluted your concentration.

Editha Aug 19th 2016 11:21 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 

Originally Posted by TGA (Post 12030361)
omg the anger!!:rofl:

embrace, build a bridge, get over it (brexit)

I haven't met anyone (in the real world) that regrets brexit or has suffered because of it (apart from the lefty bremainers and their mass dummy spit)

Well, you haven't met me.

Gordon Barlow Aug 19th 2016 11:23 pm

re: Post EU Referendum
 
Italian referendum triggers SHOCK ALARMS across USA and Europe | World | News | Daily Express
"The main proposal of the referendum would be to reform the senate to make it more efficient, but there are concerns it could be used by a fed up Italian electorate to voice their frustrations with Brussels.
Mr Renzi has said that he will resign if the vote goes against him, with the eurosceptic Five Star movement riding high in the polls and ready to pounce at a snap General Election
."

The greatest effect of the Brexit vote might be the encouragement it gives to similar protest-votes in other EU members.


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