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log burning stove

log burning stove

Old Jan 15th 2009, 8:53 pm
  #46  
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Default Re: log burning stove

Originally Posted by fionamw
I can understand the ash, very old system. But doesn't a pan scrubber scratch the glass?
No not the green furry type.
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Old Jan 16th 2009, 4:36 am
  #47  
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Default Re: log burning stove

Originally Posted by encodeme
No not the green furry type.
Don't know about Spanish stoves but I have a multifuel stove here in the UK the only time I have to clean the glass is if I don't burn it hard enough i.e. if you don't give it enough air or have it damped off too much. Other than that if it burns correctly should stay clean.
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Old Jan 16th 2009, 11:41 am
  #48  
 
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Default Re: log burning stove

Originally Posted by thatman
When we lived in Sayalonga we had a wood burning stove and found that the glass door got very dark brown - solved it by cleaning it with oven cleaner every now and again.
I can now taste the jacket potatoes we used to cook in there - delicious.

Attend your local Ferretería and buy a white bottle of HG Hagesan....Limpa vidros para recuperadores de calor. It has a picture of a wood burner on the white plastic bottle and comes in 0.5L bottles with spray top. The soot on the glass just melts away and you just wipe with newspaper or kitchen roll. Trust me I have tried them all and this is the best by miles. You will find a display of HG products at the ferretería on their own display shelving, Then just look for the woodburner on the bottle is costs 11 euros a bottle but lasts for ages and saves lots and lots of swearing etc.

Just found their website and product details. scroll down to stove cleaning glass.

http://en.es.hg.eu/wizard-shop/index...nd_other_rooms

Last edited by poshnbucks; Jan 16th 2009 at 11:47 am.
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Old Jan 16th 2009, 7:14 pm
  #49  
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Default Re: log burning stove

Originally Posted by poshnbucks
Attend your local Ferretería and buy a white bottle of HG Hagesan....Limpa vidros para recuperadores de calor. It has a picture of a wood burner on the white plastic bottle and comes in 0.5L bottles with spray top. The soot on the glass just melts away and you just wipe with newspaper or kitchen roll. Trust me I have tried them all and this is the best by miles. You will find a display of HG products at the ferretería on their own display shelving, Then just look for the woodburner on the bottle is costs 11 euros a bottle but lasts for ages and saves lots and lots of swearing etc.

Just found their website and product details. scroll down to stove cleaning glass.

http://en.es.hg.eu/wizard-shop/index...nd_other_rooms

I haven't found HG in Spain, found others perfectly good enough.....However just a quick commercial for them, anything Hagesan - marble floor cleaner, polish, you name it....I've found to be absolutely the best there is.
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Old Jan 17th 2009, 12:28 am
  #50  
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Default Re: log burning stove

OK, some very dangerous misconceptions here.

Carbon monoxide from smokeless is far more dangerous, because it carries no warning smoke. Smokeless produces just as much monoxide as anything else.

Green plastic scrubbies will scratch stainless steel, so I can assure you they will scratch glass, even if you don't notice it. Ash too is an abrasive material, so don't use it. Even fine scratches will result in the tar sticking worse in the future.

Only clean the glass in the approved way with the proper cleaning techniques.

If the inside of the stove is getting tarry, and smoke billows out into the room when you open the door, this is quite possibly the result of the flue being partly or completely blocked. Do check it, it could save your life.

All joints need to be constructed so that the male drops down into the female, and I have never in 30 years seen one of those leak condensate where they are the right way up. Get those joints wrong and no sealant will fix it. Metal tubes passing thru a wall mst be surrounded by flexible fireproof materials, if they are cemented in, they will all too often split the cement, and cause radiating cracks all the way round. A length of single skin metal flue inside is a great way to maximise heat transfer to the living space, but it does lead to higher soot and tar deposits, so the flue will need cleaning more frequently. Chimney fires are not safe or clever and do real damage.

Joints between fluepipes when correctly installed need no sealing, a friction fit is perfectly adequate. If any joint or portion leaks smoke/fumes, then there is a fault above that point which needs urgent attention. Any hole/gap in the flue should at all times see air from the room going into the flue, never the other way. A small amount of air entering the flue like this is unimportant, too much can result in chilling of the flue gasses.

If the flue gasses are chilled too much, whether by ingress of air, excessive runs of single skin pipe, or from a metal flue outside being chilled by the wind, then the flue gas temp may drop below the dew point, and condensation will then take place. This can result in black, acidic, tarry water running down the flue in considerable quantities, and where this hits an incorrect joint, leakage and staining will result.

A butterfly damper in the pipe where it exits the stove is usually an indicator of poor quality. It usually means that the seals around the door and the air intakes are less than adequate.
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Old Jan 17th 2009, 12:59 am
  #51  
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Default Re: log burning stove

Originally Posted by bil
OK, some very dangerous misconceptions here.

Carbon monoxide from smokeless is far more dangerous, because it carries no warning smoke. Smokeless produces just as much monoxide as anything else.

Green plastic scrubbies will scratch stainless steel, so I can assure you they will scratch glass, even if you don't notice it. Ash too is an abrasive material, so don't use it. Even fine scratches will result in the tar sticking worse in the future.

Only clean the glass in the approved way with the proper cleaning techniques.

If the inside of the stove is getting tarry, and smoke billows out into the room when you open the door, this is quite possibly the result of the flue being partly or completely blocked. Do check it, it could save your life.

All joints need to be constructed so that the male drops down into the female, and I have never in 30 years seen one of those leak condensate where they are the right way up. Get those joints wrong and no sealant will fix it. Metal tubes passing thru a wall mst be surrounded by flexible fireproof materials, if they are cemented in, they will all too often split the cement, and cause radiating cracks all the way round. A length of single skin metal flue inside is a great way to maximise heat transfer to the living space, but it does lead to higher soot and tar deposits, so the flue will need cleaning more frequently. Chimney fires are not safe or clever and do real damage.

Joints between fluepipes when correctly installed need no sealing, a friction fit is perfectly adequate. If any joint or portion leaks smoke/fumes, then there is a fault above that point which needs urgent attention. Any hole/gap in the flue should at all times see air from the room going into the flue, never the other way. A small amount of air entering the flue like this is unimportant, too much can result in chilling of the flue gasses.

If the flue gasses are chilled too much, whether by ingress of air, excessive runs of single skin pipe, or from a metal flue outside being chilled by the wind, then the flue gas temp may drop below the dew point, and condensation will then take place. This can result in black, acidic, tarry water running down the flue in considerable quantities, and where this hits an incorrect joint, leakage and staining will result.

A butterfly damper in the pipe where it exits the stove is usually an indicator of poor quality. It usually means that the seals around the door and the air intakes are less than adequate.
Thanks - a cut-out-and-keep I'd venture!
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Old Jan 17th 2009, 1:11 am
  #52  
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Default Re: log burning stove

Thanks. There's some more posted on the other thread.
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Old Jan 17th 2009, 1:17 am
  #53  
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Default Re: log burning stove

Originally Posted by bil
Thanks. There's some more posted on the other thread.

I know...you'll wish you hadn't been so helpful!
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Old Jan 17th 2009, 1:25 am
  #54  
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Default Re: log burning stove

Not really. I enjoy being able to pass on useful stuff, and there is always the chance that someone will add something that I didn't know, or do something that will improve my knowledge base.

In my work, which requires good understanding of chimneys, fires and their functions, I take a malicious pleasure in solving problems that no-one else seems to be able to.
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