Go Back  British Expats > Living & Moving Abroad > Europe > Spain
Reload this Page >

Farming olives in spain

Farming olives in spain

Old Jan 25th 2017, 2:29 pm
  #1  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Isobel45 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Farming olives in spain

Hello to all. This is my first post. I came to the site while searching 'farming olives in Spain' and found some very good information.

It didn't cover all my queries though so I wondered if anyone else had information to willingly impart!

Is it likely that the lawyer in charge of title deed exchange will pick up the subsidy involved with the olive farm? In other words is it best to ask the owner first if he is collecting a subsidy?

Someone said that you could not earn an income from olives is you were over 65 yrs. Both my husband and I are past that, and we are looking at the farm as something to occupy us in our retirement. I did not understand the information given in regard to this. What actually happens to the income one might hope to earn if it can't be used by yourself? Are you expected to not farm the olives? Does the caveat only apply to olives? Would it apply to almonds too?

Thank you so much for any reply.
Isobel45 is offline  
Old Jan 25th 2017, 3:04 pm
  #2  
MODERATOR
 
Rosemary's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Costa Valencia
Posts: 14,511
Rosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond reputeRosemary has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Hi and a warm welcome to the Spanish forum on BE. Myself and Fred James are the moderators for the Spanish forums whilst BEVS moderates Europe. Moderators are there to ensure that the site runs smoothly within the rules of BE. This is so that members gain the information that they are looking for and find their experiences on the forums to be friendly and worthwhile.

Problems and complaints should always be addressed to a moderator who will look into the matter and deal with it efficiently and fairly. Our members who post in the Spain Forums are usually friendly and helpful with a wealth of knowledge about the issues of living in Spain. I hope that you enjoy your time participating in the forums.

Please let me know if you need any further help.

Rosemary
Rosemary is offline  
Old Jan 25th 2017, 3:09 pm
  #3  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Isobel45 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Originally Posted by Rosemary View Post
Hi and a warm welcome to the Spanish forum on BE. Myself and Fred James are the moderators for the Spanish forums whilst BEVS moderates Europe. Moderators are there to ensure that the site runs smoothly within the rules of BE. This is so that members gain the information that they are looking for and find their experiences on the forums to be friendly and worthwhile.

Problems and complaints should always be addressed to a moderator who will look into the matter and deal with it efficiently and fairly. Our members who post in the Spain Forums are usually friendly and helpful with a wealth of knowledge about the issues of living in Spain. I hope that you enjoy your time participating in the forums.

Please let me know if you need any further help.

Rosemary
Thank you Rosemary
Isobel45 is offline  
Old Jan 26th 2017, 9:40 am
  #4  
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Andalucia Spain
Posts: 554
olivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Hi, welcome to the forum.

Just come in for my breakfast and a break from farming. So some quick answers.

You can bet your bottom euro that if the plot(s) on your land are being farmed that someone will be claiming the subvenciones. The rules keep changing on a regular basis supposedly to prevent fraud. e.g. once it was land area, then tree numbers. I am 99% sure a new claimant cannot get the subvension without being a member of a co operative. That isn't such a bad thing as you integrate better, get good advice and maybe even help and should be able to get a better price for your crop year on year compared with just turning up somewhere. There are no downsides from being a member other than you have to abide by a large raft of rules . e.g. you cannot prune your own trees until you are acredited ( in our area that was a free course lasting ten days , 4 hours a.m. and 4 hours p.m. on someone elses finca kms away.) likewise spraying for weeds and regular spraying of the trees themselves.

No harm in asking the owner if they are collecting the subsidy. You could also ask for the quantity they are dropping each year at the co op. That will be broken down into vuelo and suelo. ( Off tree and gathered off the ground) Try and get the last three years to give you an idea of quantities so you can average out good and bad years and post pruning etc yields. You can then do some personal calulations.

For example if the average yield is 7,500 Kg then that is at least 10 small trailer (unbraked car trailer) trips to the mill. That is also 7,500 kg to lift off the ground and into your trailer. Don't under estimate just how physical the job is. Of course if the yield is say 500Kg then that will be manageable as a nice hobby. You might also consider finding a mill that bottles your oil (for a small fee) .

Strangely I cannot give you a definitive answer on the post 65 thing. One thing is for certain the income will have to be declared for tax along with say pensions. I don't know anyone who physically continues after retiring. All are just glad to be receiving their nice pension and to get away from hard physical work though they are quite happy to point out to their inheriting offspring that they aren't farming correctly!

Hope that helps, back to the grindstone.....
olivefarmer is offline  
Old Jan 26th 2017, 11:20 am
  #5  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Isobel45 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Originally Posted by olivefarmer View Post
Hi, welcome to the forum.

Just come in for my breakfast and a break from farming. So some quick answers.

You can bet your bottom euro that if the plot(s) on your land are being farmed that someone will be claiming the subvenciones. The rules keep changing on a regular basis supposedly to prevent fraud. e.g. once it was land area, then tree numbers. I am 99% sure a new claimant cannot get the subvension without being a member of a co operative. That isn't such a bad thing as you integrate better, get good advice and maybe even help and should be able to get a better price for your crop year on year compared with just turning up somewhere. There are no downsides from being a member other than you have to abide by a large raft of rules . e.g. you cannot prune your own trees until you are acredited ( in our area that was a free course lasting ten days , 4 hours a.m. and 4 hours p.m. on someone elses finca kms away.) likewise spraying for weeds and regular spraying of the trees themselves.

No harm in asking the owner if they are collecting the subsidy. You could also ask for the quantity they are dropping each year at the co op. That will be broken down into vuelo and suelo. ( Off tree and gathered off the ground) Try and get the last three years to give you an idea of quantities so you can average out good and bad years and post pruning etc yields. You can then do some personal calulations.

For example if the average yield is 7,500 Kg then that is at least 10 small trailer (unbraked car trailer) trips to the mill. That is also 7,500 kg to lift off the ground and into your trailer. Don't under estimate just how physical the job is. Of course if the yield is say 500Kg then that will be manageable as a nice hobby. You might also consider finding a mill that bottles your oil (for a small fee) .

Strangely I cannot give you a definitive answer on the post 65 thing. One thing is for certain the income will have to be declared for tax along with say pensions. I don't know anyone who physically continues after retiring. All are just glad to be receiving their nice pension and to get away from hard physical work though they are quite happy to point out to their inheriting offspring that they aren't farming correctly!

Hope that helps, back to the grindstone.....
It really helps, thanks so much. Just the description of part of the work involved brings a clearer picture of what to expect. This farm has not had a resident farmer for 7 years or so. The trees and terraces need quite a bit of cleaning as it is.

(It does sound as though you enjoy it though!)
Isobel45 is offline  
Old Jan 26th 2017, 12:34 pm
  #6  
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Andalucia Spain
Posts: 554
olivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Lunchtime If the trees have been neglected you would be well advised to get them (olives and almonds ) pruned into shape by an expert to start. You will be able to create a starter supply of logs for your following winter too.

Some Spanish friends specialise in buying neglected plots, whipping into shape and then selling on some years later. I suppose like people buy neglected cars in the Uk and tart them up.

Getting hold of an expert will be "fun" (challenge?).
olivefarmer is offline  
Old Jan 26th 2017, 1:20 pm
  #7  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Isobel45 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Originally Posted by olivefarmer View Post
Lunchtime If the trees have been neglected you would be well advised to get them (olives and almonds ) pruned into shape by an expert to start. You will be able to create a starter supply of logs for your following winter too.

Some Spanish friends specialise in buying neglected plots, whipping into shape and then selling on some years later. I suppose like people buy neglected cars in the Uk and tart them up.

Getting hold of an expert will be "fun" (challenge?).
We would rather go down the route of learning to prune them ourselves. There is no pressure on us to bring the property into full production quickly. It's a bit more like a salvage job to keep busy for as long as we can.

To claim the subsidy, does one have to say how many olive trees there are? The current owner appeared not to know the answer when asked.
Isobel45 is offline  
Old Jan 26th 2017, 5:33 pm
  #8  
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Andalucia Spain
Posts: 554
olivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

SigPac shows the trees on your land. When you are buying/bought you have a parcel(s) number of your plot(s). all land was aerial photo'd.

The local co op would instantly be able to tell you how many from the records. If the plot is very small it won't qualify.

I have yet to meet a person who doesn't know how many olive trees they have that qualify for grants. Most do, it is the only thing they talk about in the bar.
olivefarmer is offline  
Old Feb 1st 2017, 10:38 am
  #9  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Isobel45 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

just in case you were interested 😊. we asked the owner with regard to subsidy, tree numbers and co-op. it turns out that they used a stone mill grinder, choosing not to use the co-op which exits in a small nearby town. they never applied for a subsidy. they are getting back to me on the number of trees, if the owner remembers.

is the subsidy connected to using a co-op? why is there a subsidy, and how much is it, if you know?

with thanks in anticipation of your reply.

Last edited by Isobel45; Feb 1st 2017 at 10:42 am.
Isobel45 is offline  
Old Feb 1st 2017, 3:29 pm
  #10  
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Andalucia Spain
Posts: 554
olivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Have sent you a PM (private message)
olivefarmer is offline  
Old Feb 3rd 2017, 5:56 pm
  #11  
BE Forum Addict
 
philat98's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Central Italy
Posts: 2,595
philat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Originally Posted by Isobel45 View Post
We would rather go down the route of learning to prune them ourselves.
Pruning can be a bit hazardous if you have many trees. It often involves getting up on a ladder with powerful cutters. Letting somebody else take the risk is an attractive option if you can afford it.
philat98 is offline  
Old Feb 3rd 2017, 6:18 pm
  #12  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Isobel45 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Originally Posted by philat98 View Post
Pruning can be a bit hazardous if you have many trees. It often involves getting up on a ladder with powerful cutters. Letting somebody else take the risk is an attractive option if you can afford it.
Thank you. Good advice. Would a chain saw work as well, or is it a case of powerful cutters for smaller size branches? How often Do the trees need pruning?
Isobel45 is offline  
Old Feb 3rd 2017, 6:56 pm
  #13  
BE Forum Addict
 
philat98's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Central Italy
Posts: 2,595
philat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond reputephilat98 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Where we live in Italy they give the trees a strong pruning in February and March to control the size And shape of the tree and encourage fruit production. They use small chainsaws to remove unwanted branches often those growing high. There is a second pruning in the summer to remove unwanted green shoots. They might use powered secateurs to cut smaller branches. A tree that is fairly low and grows on flat land is much easier to manage. Remember that you have to keep the land clean too especially at harvest time.
philat98 is offline  
Old Feb 4th 2017, 9:15 am
  #14  
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Andalucia Spain
Posts: 554
olivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond reputeolivefarmer has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Pruning. A chainsaw is handy for larger limbs and for creating logs for the inevitable log burner you will get/use. Higher branches are pruned using a pole saw. Essentially a chainsaw with a pole between the motor and the chain. Buy reputable kit e.g. Stihl.

Pruning regime depends entirely on what the trees are like, soil and how much water they receive. Don't forget that if you are six foot tall and are using a fibreglass pole high above you you will need to be fit to harvest anything higher than five metres off the ground. Suck it and see would be my advice. As a hobby you will make mistakes but where would the fun be doing everything right!
olivefarmer is offline  
Old Feb 4th 2017, 11:30 am
  #15  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Isobel45 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Farming olives in spain

Originally Posted by olivefarmer View Post
Pruning. A chainsaw is handy for larger limbs and for creating logs for the inevitable log burner you will get/use. Higher branches are pruned using a pole saw. Essentially a chainsaw with a pole between the motor and the chain. Buy reputable kit e.g. Stihl.

Pruning regime depends entirely on what the trees are like, soil and how much water they receive. Don't forget that if you are six foot tall and are using a fibreglass pole high above you you will need to be fit to harvest anything higher than five metres off the ground. Suck it and see would be my advice. As a hobby you will make mistakes but where would the fun be doing everything right!
Thanks for your reply. Yes, i think it could well be fun. None of the trees looked particularly tall, though the owner was pruning from a ladder in a photo they showed us. The farm is off the electricity grid. The area had 4 months of drought recently and some of the almonds looked dead. It is close to irrigation water though so if connected, that should help. The soil did not look overly fertile. It was whitish and stony. Most of the area was under olives, and olive trees on nearby properties looked full of life and vigor.
Isobel45 is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.