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Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Old Sep 5th 2011, 2:12 am
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Default Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Hello, I'm looking for advice about potentially moving to Spain, because I have always wanted to since I first started visiting, after my degree (2012, at least) if anyone is able to give it.

To preface: I'm 24, my degree is BA Spanish with history, history being a minor, and I also have a TEFL certificate but I have been told that's nothing fantastically unique. I would like to teach English in Spain in the future, and have been getting some experience via my degree. I spent the last three months in Albacete, volunteering in a primary school, and will spend 8 months from October as a teaching assistant in a secondary school in Águilas, Murcia, as well as hopefully staying through the summer and finding some temp work in maybe a summer camp or classes.

So, what I will have is the ability to speak Spanish well, teaching experience and I am getting together references and connections through teachers who can help me find things in the future. Problem is, I know the economy has been struggling horribly, and I know spending cuts are coming and that'll hit teachers, so how realistic am I being to think I can succeed? Albacete was potentially a place I was thinking of living, as I really like the area, but that may change in the next two years, I know.

Thanks!
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Old Sep 5th 2011, 2:33 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Hi Sorani!

I think you are asking an impossile Q as noone can see the future, but you'll be glad to know that you are better qualified than 99% of the Brits who want to move to Spain.

A Tefl will help you work for schools that teach English as part time courses, but if you want to teach English permanently as a full time job in a Spanish state school, then you'll need to pass the oposiciones i.e. the Spanish teaching exams. These can take a couple of years to pass, are pretty difficult and then they can send you anywhere in Spain when a position comes free.

The alternative is to work in a private school who dont ask for oposiciones (unless it is concertado), but they dont pay as well. State school salaries are actually pretty good, starting at around 23k in some regions.

Are you working as a teaching assistant though the bilingual scheme with the British council? They send British teachers to work in Spanish schools for a year at a time, but think it is only temporary and I think you have to work at a British school to start with.

As for whether the spending cuts will effect anything, well probably, but also probably no worse than in any other country. Rubalcaba of the PSOE has already promised not to cut education and health spending, but he is unlikely to win the elections in November. The PP will probably cut budgets, but noone can say by how much

I'd say your chances of success depend on your academic ability (if you want to pass the oposiciones). English teachers in state schools are in demand because the current set of teachers dont have them. And few Brits are good enough at Spanish to pass the exams
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Old Sep 5th 2011, 2:45 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Hello Sorani,
As Concierges for the Spanish section of BE we would like to say hello and welcome.

BE is a very large expat website, so if you have problems finding your way around we have concierges who will try to direct you. The moderators for the Spanish forums are Mitzyboy and Fred James, moderators are there to ensure that the site runs smoothly within the rules of BE. Problems and complaints should always be addressed to a moderador who will look into the matter and deal with it efficiently and fairly. Our members who post in the Spain Forums are friendly and helpful with a wealth of knowledge of the issues of living in Spain. At the top of the page you will find a quirkily named thread called Free Beer which is full of important and useful information. Hope you enjoy your time participating in the forums.

Please let us know if you need any further help.

Rosemary and Graham
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Old Sep 5th 2011, 5:06 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by cricketman
Hi Sorani!

I think you are asking an impossile Q as noone can see the future, but you'll be glad to know that you are better qualified than 99% of the Brits who want to move to Spain.

A Tefl will help you work for schools that teach English as part time courses, but if you want to teach English permanently as a full time job in a Spanish state school, then you'll need to pass the oposiciones i.e. the Spanish teaching exams. These can take a couple of years to pass, are pretty difficult and then they can send you anywhere in Spain when a position comes free.

The alternative is to work in a private school who dont ask for oposiciones (unless it is concertado), but they dont pay as well. State school salaries are actually pretty good, starting at around 23k in some regions.

Are you working as a teaching assistant though the bilingual scheme with the British council? They send British teachers to work in Spanish schools for a year at a time, but think it is only temporary and I think you have to work at a British school to start with.

As for whether the spending cuts will effect anything, well probably, but also probably no worse than in any other country. Rubalcaba of the PSOE has already promised not to cut education and health spending, but he is unlikely to win the elections in November. The PP will probably cut budgets, but noone can say by how much

I'd say your chances of success depend on your academic ability (if you want to pass the oposiciones). English teachers in state schools are in demand because the current set of teachers dont have them. And few Brits are good enough at Spanish to pass the exams
Hi Cman long time no see, or hear as the case is, you were missed.

I agree that sheis far better equipped than most, but most of the English teachers in state schools have passed the "oppies" as the interinos that were teaching were starting to be phased out quite a few years ago.

They had to sit the exam as their posts became available for all candidates, some managed to stay others did not.

The problem with the English oppies is that it is not a level play playing field, loads of moduales have to be studies and the candidates choose "balls" like bingo, this decides what they will have to present to the judging panel.

So get real easy ones, ie to be and passive, others get moduales that even native speakers would find difficult to presnet to the panel.

The sucessful ones can be sent anywhere in the region that the exam is taken, a pass in Galicia will mean a placement in Galicia etc. The "destiono"can be changed every year until a permanent place is give out.

I have know quite a few, who have given up, one of the factors being that every year there maybe a couple of hundred vacancies in all of Spain, for English teachers but thousands of students coming out of uni who are eligible to sit the exam.

Added to the number who are still trying, it is tough, very tough.

For the ones that make it, after the initial toing and froing in tempory jobs,then, it is a job for life, with security.
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Old Sep 6th 2011, 11:18 pm
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by cricketman
Hi Sorani!

I think you are asking an impossile Q as noone can see the future, but you'll be glad to know that you are better qualified than 99% of the Brits who want to move to Spain.

A Tefl will help you work for schools that teach English as part time courses, but if you want to teach English permanently as a full time job in a Spanish state school, then you'll need to pass the oposiciones i.e. the Spanish teaching exams. These can take a couple of years to pass, are pretty difficult and then they can send you anywhere in Spain when a position comes free.

The alternative is to work in a private school who dont ask for oposiciones (unless it is concertado), but they dont pay as well. State school salaries are actually pretty good, starting at around 23k in some regions.

Are you working as a teaching assistant though the bilingual scheme with the British council? They send British teachers to work in Spanish schools for a year at a time, but think it is only temporary and I think you have to work at a British school to start with.

As for whether the spending cuts will effect anything, well probably, but also probably no worse than in any other country. Rubalcaba of the PSOE has already promised not to cut education and health spending, but he is unlikely to win the elections in November. The PP will probably cut budgets, but noone can say by how much

I'd say your chances of success depend on your academic ability (if you want to pass the oposiciones). English teachers in state schools are in demand because the current set of teachers dont have them. And few Brits are good enough at Spanish to pass the exams
Quite accurate comment. In Madrid, they are making a big effort to children become bilingual. This is somehow far from reality by now, first flaw I see is that they lack of native teachers. So you can have an opportunity here but, from my experience, you need at least a B1-B2 level of Spanish to be successful. You can acquire it fast by language exchange. Good luck with your endeavour.
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Old Sep 6th 2011, 11:57 pm
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by JuanSolo
Quite accurate comment. In Madrid, they are making a big effort to children become bilingual. This is somehow far from reality by now, first flaw I see is that they lack of native teachers. So you can have an opportunity here but, from my experience, you need at least a B1-B2 level of Spanish to be successful. You can acquire it fast by language exchange. Good luck with your endeavour.
Sounds good for the OP; just out of interest where are these B1, B2 etc definitions of Spanish level to be found? (You'll guess from me needing to know that I'm probably nowhere even near any level!!!)
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Old Sep 7th 2011, 1:39 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by fionamw
Sounds good for the OP; just out of interest where are these B1, B2 etc definitions of Spanish level to be found? (You'll guess from me needing to know that I'm probably nowhere even near any level!!!)
It is the Common European Framework of Reference. You can find it here: http://europass.cedefop.europa.eu/La...essmentGrid/en

It is a good reference because you can self-assess your language skills with no official qualification. It is intended for easing the mobility in EC. If you put your level in your CV you give a clue to potential employers of what is your level of second language(s).

It is commonly used in other expats forums.

Last edited by JuanSolo; Sep 7th 2011 at 3:33 am.
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Old Sep 7th 2011, 3:36 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Had a quick look.. very good! Thanks
As to me? Well I wish they could split into A2+ or B1-or that kind of thing!!!
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Old Sep 7th 2011, 4:46 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by fionamw
Had a quick look.. very good! Thanks
As to me? Well I wish they could split into A2+ or B1-or that kind of thing!!!
I think I'm a C1 for speaking and listening and a B2 for reading and writing.

I find buying Spanish novels difficult as the classics or the serious contemporary stuff has a lot of vocabulary I'm not famliar with. I can read any books that have been translated from another language really easily, just like reading English, but when it is a good Spanish author who loves to play with the language I have trouble
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Old Sep 7th 2011, 5:42 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by cricketman
I think I'm a C1 for speaking and listening and a B2 for reading and writing.

I find buying Spanish novels difficult as the classics or the serious contemporary stuff has a lot of vocabulary I'm not famliar with. I can read any books that have been translated from another language really easily, just like reading English, but when it is a good Spanish author who loves to play with the language I have trouble
I suggest you Torcuato Luca de Tena. He has a straightforward Spanish. IMHO he is the best Spanish writer I have ever read. I read the book 'Cartas del más allá' when I was a teenager and I really enjoyed it.

Last edited by JuanSolo; Sep 7th 2011 at 5:52 am.
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Old Sep 7th 2011, 8:34 pm
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by JuanSolo
I suggest you Torcuato Luca de Tena. He has a straightforward Spanish. IMHO he is the best Spanish writer I have ever read. I read the book 'Cartas del más allá' when I was a teenager and I really enjoyed it.
Thanks for the suggestion, I'll check it out!
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Old Nov 29th 2011, 3:59 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by Sorani
Hello, I'm looking for advice about potentially moving to Spain, because I have always wanted to since I first started visiting, after my degree (2012, at least) if anyone is able to give it.

To preface: I'm 24, my degree is BA Spanish with history, history being a minor, and I also have a TEFL certificate but I have been told that's nothing fantastically unique. I would like to teach English in Spain in the future, and have been getting some experience via my degree. I spent the last three months in Albacete, volunteering in a primary school, and will spend 8 months from October as a teaching assistant in a secondary school in Águilas, Murcia, as well as hopefully staying through the summer and finding some temp work in maybe a summer camp or classes.

So, what I will have is the ability to speak Spanish well, teaching experience and I am getting together references and connections through teachers who can help me find things in the future. Problem is, I know the economy has been struggling horribly, and I know spending cuts are coming and that'll hit teachers, so how realistic am I being to think I can succeed? Albacete was potentially a place I was thinking of living, as I really like the area, but that may change in the next two years, I know.

Thanks!
Interested in The Basque country at all?
My daughter in law has a language school together with a local Basque woman, in Elorrio, Bizkaia.
The name of the school is On Track.
They have a young lad at the moment, but he's keen on going to Valencia after June.
Euzkadi is a great area, but then I'm biased because my wife is from here!
You have everything:
Pyrenees 2-3 hours drive away
France 100km away
Good surfing if you like it
Few Brits!!!!! Read into that what you will!
Good food & wine
Good, clean beaches
Best pintxos in Spain (tapas)
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Old Nov 29th 2011, 6:25 am
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Hello Sorani, You are certainly qualified enough to fill many teaching vacancies here in Spain.Here is an example of what is on offer from just one of many spanish work websites. Take a look at:
http://www.indeed.es/ofertas?q=nativ...FYYTfAody33pfQ
Regarding location, well it's each to his own on that one. Personally I prefer the mediterranean side of Spain because it's warmer.
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Old Nov 29th 2011, 10:27 pm
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Hi there Sorani, first of all, congratulations for your interest in Spain, you obviously like the culture and language and not only the weather.

Unfortunately it will be almost impossible to get an "oposición" as a "profesora de Inglés". People are really killing each other and places are extremely limited, especially considering all the coming cuts. On the other hand, I'm sorry to say that I don't think you would comply with the requisites, as your TEFL is not comparable to the teaching degrees and masters required here. You only have something comparable partly to a Licenciatura en Filología Hispánica, and not a master in teaching English, TED or CAP. But please check this just in case.

In any case, you should find quite easily jobs in "colegios privados" and "academias de idiomas". I think that something that would also help to make you more interesting in Spain is getting a high DELE grade. As JuanSolo said, at least B, but with your background I'm sure that you can do better. Check the INSTITUTO CERVANTES website, as the DELE is really the only recognition accepted in Spain to demonstrate the knowledge of Spanish and it should be easy for you to get it and it will definitely be highly valued by private employers.

You must have realised by now that, it anything, Spain have some of the best educated unemployed people in the world! "Titulitis", as we call it.

Last edited by evamar; Nov 29th 2011 at 10:29 pm.
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Old Nov 29th 2011, 11:47 pm
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Default Re: Advice for living in Spain in the future.

Originally Posted by evamar
(...)
You must have realised by now that, it anything, Spain have some of the best educated unemployed people in the world! "Titulitis", as we call it.
That topic deserves its own thread!
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