Fines: Who benefits?

Old Apr 4th 2012, 3:25 pm
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Default Fines: Who benefits?

Network Rail has been fined £4m over the Grayrigg crash in Cumbria in which an 84-year-old woman died and 88 people were injured.

Margaret Masson, of Glasgow, died after the Virgin train derailed on the West Coast Main Line in February 2007, after going over a "degraded" set of points.

Network Rail Infrastructure Ltd earlier admitted health and safety breaches.

Mrs Masson's family said they found it "offensive" that as taxpayers they would be contributing to the fine.

After sentencing on Wednesday, solicitor Soyab Patel, speaking on behalf of Mrs Masson's family, said: "The fine of £4m, together with costs, will ultimately be borne by the taxpayer.

"Mrs Langley [Mrs Masson's daughter] is a taxpayer.

"Her mother died in the crash. She and her husband suffered serious injuries.

"She finds it offensive she is contributing to the fine."


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-17609369

So who gets the money? Straight into Government coffers?

I don't see the point--surely the right thing to do is to ensure that the causes have been properly identified, and then to ensure that Network Rail have put / are putting them right--that's where any money should go. And anyone in management who could reasonably be found culpable should a) suffer appropriate consequences, and b) if the appropriate consequences do not amount to sacking, then be directed to work on putting things right because s/he should, presumably, have excellent knowledge of what went wrong.
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Old Apr 5th 2012, 2:53 am
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Default Re: Fines: Who benefits?

Originally Posted by Bahtatboy View Post
Network Rail has been fined £4m over the Grayrigg crash in Cumbria in which an 84-year-old woman died and 88 people were injured.

Margaret Masson, of Glasgow, died after the Virgin train derailed on the West Coast Main Line in February 2007, after going over a "degraded" set of points.

Network Rail Infrastructure Ltd earlier admitted health and safety breaches.

Mrs Masson's family said they found it "offensive" that as taxpayers they would be contributing to the fine.

After sentencing on Wednesday, solicitor Soyab Patel, speaking on behalf of Mrs Masson's family, said: "The fine of £4m, together with costs, will ultimately be borne by the taxpayer.

"Mrs Langley [Mrs Masson's daughter] is a taxpayer.

"Her mother died in the crash. She and her husband suffered serious injuries.

"She finds it offensive she is contributing to the fine."


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-17609369

So who gets the money? Straight into Government coffers?

I don't see the point--surely the right thing to do is to ensure that the causes have been properly identified, and then to ensure that Network Rail have put / are putting them right--that's where any money should go. And anyone in management who could reasonably be found culpable should a) suffer appropriate consequences, and b) if the appropriate consequences do not amount to sacking, then be directed to work on putting things right because s/he should, presumably, have excellent knowledge of what went wrong.
What ARE Network Rail these days? Government-owned? Privately owned? Listed? Member of FTSE 100?

And pardon my cynicism - but were the lady's family hoping THEY would get some money out of this?

Last edited by The Dean; Apr 5th 2012 at 2:55 am. Reason: .
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Old Apr 5th 2012, 4:27 am
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Default Re: Fines: Who benefits?

Originally Posted by The Dean View Post
What ARE Network Rail these days? Government-owned? Privately owned? Listed? Member of FTSE 100?

And pardon my cynicism - but were the lady's family hoping THEY would get some money out of this?
I don't get the impression they were. I just think they were expecting the bosses of network rail to pick up the fine out of their own pockets, or something along those lines.

And it's not really a fine per-se. It's more they've had £4m taken out of next year's budget as a punishment. Which is ironic when most of the problems on the rail lines are due to underinvestment.
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