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-   -   Don't wear that shirt! (https://britishexpats.com/forum/sand-pit-116/dont-wear-shirt-774210/)

Bahtatboy Oct 10th 2012 12:10 pm

Don't wear that shirt!
 
The Muslim Council of Britain is attempting to stop Newcastle United from using its new shirt. Under the banner of Sharia law, the MCB states (in respect of Sharia law):

"The idea is to protect the vulnerable and the needy from exploitation by the rich and powerful."

I fully support the MCB in this. The UK has nothing whatsoever in place to put such ethics in place. We don't have the Unfair Contract Terms Act, The Distance Selling Act (or whatever it's called), the Citizens Advice Bureaux and various other legal and practical measures to protect ill-informed and vulnerable consumers and employees from exploitation by companies and the Government. We definitely need the MCB to come and make us clean up our act.

I'm also extremely pleased to see that the MCB is drawing on the shining examples shown in so many countries of all the real and effective measures in place to ensure that the vulnerable and needy are protected from exploitation.

http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/news/n...070006117.html

The_Citizen Oct 10th 2012 12:14 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 
Wonga is a horrible horrible company!

I think they already sponsor Blackpool as well :s

Bahtatboy Oct 10th 2012 12:15 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by Manchester_QS (Post 10323384)
Wonga is a horrible horrible company!

I think they already sponsor Blackpool as well :s

Yep, agree with that. But the MCB can go **** itself.

auzdafluff Oct 10th 2012 12:20 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by Bahtatboy (Post 10323376)
The Muslim Council of Britain is attempting to stop Newcastle United from using its new shirt. Under the banner of Sharia law, the MCB states (in respect of Sharia law):

"The idea is to protect the vulnerable and the needy from exploitation by the rich and powerful."

I fully support the MCB in this. The UK has nothing whatsoever in place to put such ethics in place. We don't have the Unfair Contract Terms Act, The Distance Selling Act (or whatever it's called), the Citizens Advice Bureaux and various other legal and practical measures to protect ill-informed and vulnerable consumers and employees from exploitation by companies and the Government. We definitely need the MCB to come and make us clean up our act.

I'm also extremely pleased to see that the MCB is drawing on the shining examples shown in so many countries of all the real and effective measures in place to ensure that the vulnerable and needy are protected from exploitation.

http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/news/n...070006117.html

They shouldn't have brought up Sharia Law. They've immediately lost because people will be scared that by agreeing they'll somehow be letting it in by the backdoor.

That said, the MCB is right on this. Wonga and its ilk are nothing more than loansharks with high street branches and websites.

Scamp Oct 10th 2012 12:24 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by Bahtatboy (Post 10323388)
But the MCB can go **** itself.

Amen.

Looking at the Wonga case - I see nothing wrong with it. If Betting companies are allowed to advertise and in fact the whole league is sponsored by a bank caught fixing the rates then why should we exclude Wonga?

Crooks the lot of them.

OleJanx Oct 10th 2012 12:48 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by Scamp (Post 10323406)
Amen.

Looking at the Wonga case - I see nothing wrong with it. If Betting companies are allowed to advertise and in fact the whole league is sponsored by a bank caught fixing the rates then why should we exclude Wonga?

Crooks the lot of them.

I think Wonga's problem lies with the 2350% APR...

Bahtatboy Oct 10th 2012 12:54 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by OleJanx (Post 10323439)
I think Wonga's problem lies with the 2350% APR...

Yeah, they're missing the goalie: 1235 is the sort of aggressive, attacking formation I like to see.

Scamp Oct 10th 2012 1:20 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by OleJanx (Post 10323439)
I think Wonga's problem lies with the 2350% APR...

But that's clearly stated.

Only a fool would take a payday loan.

Meow Oct 10th 2012 1:21 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 
Did they speak out when Man City (I think) were sponsored by Chang beer?

auzdafluff Oct 10th 2012 1:22 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by Scamp (Post 10323500)
But that's clearly stated.

Only a fool would take a payday loan.

Wonga had a net income of £45.8m on revenues of £185m in 2011.

I'd say that means there's plenty of idiots out there.

Scamp Oct 10th 2012 1:38 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by Meow (Post 10323503)
Did they speak out when Man City (I think) were sponsored by Chang beer?

Everton wasn't it? But No.

What about when those dirty skate bastards were sponsored by Ty Beanie Babies?

Paedo's heaven. Cuddly toys and football....make it easier for them.

Theseus Oct 10th 2012 1:52 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by auzdafluff (Post 10323505)
Wonga had a net income of £45.8m on revenues of £185m in 2011.

I'd say that means there's plenty of idiots out there.

There are many desperate people to take advantage of.

Scamp Oct 10th 2012 2:18 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by auzdafluff (Post 10323505)
Wonga had a net income of £45.8m on revenues of £185m in 2011.

I'd say that means there's plenty of idiots out there.

Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Richard Branson, Alan Sugar.... none of those people made a fortune by being nice.

Where there is a need, there is a business. Wonga etc wouldn't operate if it was illegal. The UK is too heavily regulated.

Bahtatboy Oct 10th 2012 2:34 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by Scamp (Post 10323583)
Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Richard Branson, Alan Sugar.... none of those people made a fortune by being nice.

Where there is a need, there is a business. Wonga etc wouldn't operate if it was illegal. The UK is too heavily regulated.

Bill et al: Correct, but there's a big difference between "not nice" and an APR of 2,000%.

Regulation: No. We have a long history of laissez faire attitudes to business in the UK, but there are various measures in place to make sure that the vulnerable don't get exploited. Ads have to be honest, legal, decent and truthful. Goods and services have to be as described--if they're not, there are various recourses available, most of them well balanced. Goods generally have to be fit for purpose, which is fair. Companies are generally not overly constrained in their operations by consumer protection (and very, very lightly in B2B transactions, with the major protection for small companies against the big boys).

Illegality: No, it isn't illegal, but they're operating on the fringes and I hope that more legislation will come about: the loans are aimed at the most needy, and generally they are the least well-informed--need and lack of awarness = vunerability.

Its not a perfect system, but companies who operate ethically and provide good products and services can do well, and vunerable consumers and small business have a fair level of protection.

Meow Oct 10th 2012 2:42 pm

Re: Don't wear that shirt!
 

Originally Posted by Bahtatboy (Post 10323603)
Bill et al: Correct, but there's a big difference between "not nice" and an APR of 2,000%.

Regulation: No. We have a long history of laissez faire attitudes to business in the UK, but there are various measures in place to make sure that the vulnerable don't get exploited. Ads have to be honest, legal, decent and truthful. Goods and services have to be as described--if they're not, there are various recourses available, most of them well balanced. Goods generally have to be fit for purpose, which is fair. Companies are generally not overly constrained in their operations by consumer protection (and very, very lightly in B2B transactions, with the major protection for small companies against the big boys).

Illegality: No, it isn't illegal, but they're operating on the fringes and I hope that more legislation will come about: the loans are aimed at the most needy, and generally they are the least well-informed--need and lack of awarness = vunerability.

Its not a perfect system, but companies who operate ethically and provide good products and services can do well, and vunerable consumers and small business have a fair level of protection.

:goodpost:

It is not necessary to be a bastard and take advantage of others to be successful.


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