British Expats

British Expats (https://britishexpats.com/forum/)
-   Saint Lucia (https://britishexpats.com/forum/saint-lucia-176/)
-   -   St. Lucia Pictures (https://britishexpats.com/forum/saint-lucia-176/st-lucia-pictures-683262/)

mosquitobaitt Aug 29th 2010 8:28 pm

St. Lucia Pictures
 
3 Attachment(s)
Would like to see pictures of St. Lucia. Please post yours.

mosquitobaitt Aug 29th 2010 8:29 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
3 Attachment(s)
some more

mosquitobaitt Aug 29th 2010 8:31 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
3 Attachment(s)
and a few more!

pgtips Sep 1st 2010 7:08 am

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
Nice pics, did you take them recently whilst on holiday ?

grandmalee Sep 1st 2010 9:05 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
2 Attachment(s)
Here's one of the Pitons in the morning...and in the evening...aren't they majestic?

pgtips Sep 3rd 2010 8:26 am

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
Filmed this whilst lazing on the beach a few weeks ago

http://www.youtube.com/v/EHdpk8XZB2w?fs=1&hl=en_GB

pgtips Sep 3rd 2010 8:39 am

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
2 Attachment(s)
What kind of fish is this ? It caused quite a commotion as it swam close to the bathers.

Scottylad Sep 16th 2010 2:27 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
pgtips

It's quite scary looking isn't it with the clawed feet and the coloured bumps? Can't remember the name we were told but there was one swimming along at Windjammer about 18 months ago and someone there could identify it.

If the name comes back to me I'll let you know.

Scottylad Sep 16th 2010 4:02 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
pgtips

I seem to recall being told it was called a granada fish but can't find any info on google about them.

grandmalee Sep 16th 2010 4:43 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
Maybe a gurnard? Also called a sea robin...I found many images that look similar through google images

Scottylad Sep 17th 2010 10:59 am

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
granmalee

Definitely not a gurnard. This thing has what looks like wings with claws at the end, is dark brown with blue raised spots and a large head and when you see it you do not want to get too close to it. When we saw it at Windjammer all it did was move slowly back and forward across the bay very close to the beach.

Scottylad Sep 23rd 2010 1:25 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 
5 Attachment(s)
Still can't trace this fish but think the person who identified it may have called it a flying granada.

Some more photos for you.

LottieLou Oct 20th 2010 6:41 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 

Originally Posted by pgtips (Post 8822965)
What kind of fish is this ? It caused quite a commotion as it swam close to the bathers.

I'll post that pic up on one of the scuba forums I'm on and see if someone can recognize it for you :D

LottieLou Oct 20th 2010 6:58 pm

Re: St. Lucia Pictures
 

Originally Posted by pgtips (Post 8822965)
What kind of fish is this ? It caused quite a commotion as it swam close to the bathers.

Just been looking at this again and I'm just wondering whether it's a Greater Bulldog Bat (yes, I said Bat, as in the nocturnal mammal). These bats are common in the Caribbean region and Central/South America

Quoted from article
"Of the 900 plus species of bats in the world, the Caribbean holds a very interesting species of bat, the Bull Dog bat also known as the Fishing Bat. Belonging to the order Chiroptera or “hand wing”, bats have the same number of bones in their hand-like wings as does the human hand. The ‘thumb’ in all bats is a small hook used for hanging from branches or clinging to rock walls.

The Bull Dog bat is unique in that the ends of the wing bones have evolved into extended talon-like claws, similar to those of eagles, which the bat uses to snatch fish as it flies over the water’s surface. Contrary to the Ojibwe legend and much centuries old disinformation, bats are not blind; however, their powers of echolocation guide them more so than their sight.

The Bull Dog bat, earning that name by reminding early scientists of their canine bull dogs at home, has an exceptionally sophisticated echolocation ability often compared to that of dolphins. Coming out of their roosts as the sun sets, Bull Dog bats have shown that they can echolocate a fish fin that breaks the surface no more than 1/16th of an inch.

The bats then swoop in to gaff fish up to 4-5” in length and as they fly away they move the fish into their mouths with hand-like wings. They also demonstrate an ability to ‘remember’ a particularly fertile fishing ground where, instead of echolocating, they simply skim the surface as they probe the water with their claws and impale their prey.

While most bats cannot take off from a flat surface, having to climb into a hanging position to launch themselves, the Bull Dog bats can land on water and swim across the surface using their wings as paddles. Fishermen throughout the Caribbean islands have reported seeing Bull Dog bats floating amongst flocks of pelicans in the evening, waiting for schools of bait fish and minnows to move toward the surface from the depths. The people on the islands of Antigua and Barbuda honored their population of Bull Dog fishing bats with a postage stamp.

Adult Bull Dog bats have bodies approximately 5 inches in length with wingspans of 20 inches. Their faces are furless with a pointed muzzle, hair lipped mouths, and tube-like noses that extend slightly beyond the mouth. Upon catching a fish, they chew it with teeth powerful enough to crush bone and then store the masticated fish in elastic cheek pouches, continuing to fish until dawn when they return to their roosts.

They roost in caves, rocky crevices, and hollow trees near sea shores, rivers, and lakes but rarely amongst human habitats unlike other bat species. Bachelor males roost separately from females who remain with their same female companions for years. Although there is some variation depending on the availability of food and weather, Bull Dog bats generally mate in the Fall, delivering one pup per year after a two month gestation. The pup is cared for by both parents until it reaches adulthood and can fly at the age of about one month.

While there are no solid statistics on Bull Dog bat populations, what we do know is that all bats, and particularly the Bull Dog bats, are under great pressure from human encroachment. As more and more people move to our shores, the Bull Dog bats’ habitat is being destroyed. Caves are sealed over or are disturbed by human intrusion. Crevices are filled in to create buildable lots for homes and resorts. Trees are cut down as land is cleared. Water is polluted and reefs are destroyed causing fish to die or move elsewhere and the bats are disappearing for lack of habitable territory and food. And, although it was once common to see the fishing bats, it has now become a rare and extraordinary sight. "


http://www.allatsea.net/article/Dece...bean_-_Part_II

LottieLou Oct 21st 2010 8:04 am

Found it!
 
2 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by LottieLou (Post 8931574)
I'll post that pic up on one of the scuba forums I'm on and see if someone can recognize it for you :D

Found it! It is a Flying Gurnard (sorry scotty!) I've attached a couple of other pictures that show a darker gurnard...

:D


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:17 am.

Powered by vBulletin: ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.