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OVER 50's+ MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

OVER 50's+ MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Old Jan 27th 2011, 4:15 pm
  #2326  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Originally Posted by dontheturner View Post
Hello Mum, There used to be market stalls, in Walsall & Birmingham selling tins of food, off cheap with no labels, on them. during the War - Smashing, if it happened to be Spam, which I still buy here, 'cos I love it. dontheturner
You and my teenager Yuck. He likes to slice it and fry it.
We used to shake the can and guess, I always guessed peaches, (wishful thinking )
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 4:45 pm
  #2327  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

The term "Taffy" may be a merging of the common Welsh name "Dafydd" and the Welsh river "Taff" on which Cardiff is built, and seems to have been in use by the mid-eighteenth century.[2] The rhyme may be related to one published in Tommy Thumb's Pretty Song Book, printed in London around 1744which had the lyrics:

This version seems to have been particularly popular in the English counties that bordered Wales, where it was sung on Saint David's Day (1 March) complete with leek-wearing effigies of Welshmen.[1] The image of thieving Welshmen seems to have begun to die down by the mid-twentieth century, although the insulting rhyme was, still sometimes used along with the name "Taffy" for any Welshman

Nothing against you Taffy


Here's another one amazing when you look behind the poem and find the history. I have always loved finding the reason for a poem.

Hark hark the dogs do bark
The beggars are coming to town
Some in rags and some in jags*
And one in a velvet gown.

A cautionary tale - Nursery rhyme dates back to 13th century England
The origins of this story, reflected in the lyrics, is seeped in history. Wandering minstrels and beggars went from town to town singing their songs and rhymes - secret messages of dissent were often found in the lyrics and could lead to plots and uprisings against the crown and governments of the day. Dogs barking alerted communities to strangers in their midst, hence the words 'Hark, hark the dogs do bark ...' - " Beware of strangers"

* Jags - A slash or slit in a garment exposing material of a different color (especially popular during the Tudor period.)

Additional Information regarding the history & origin of this rhyme
Out thanks go to Yasmin Mazur for submitting the following possibilities for
'Hark, Hark the dogs do bark'
In 1688 William of Orange brought his Dutch followers to England - it is suggested that the person referred do as being 'one in a velvet gown' was William himself and the beggars referred to his Dutch associates

or

It refers to the Dissolution of the Monasteries (1536 - 1540) perpetrated by King Henry VIII and his chief minister Thomas Cromwell, when England broke from the Catholic religion. Their objective was to loot the monasteries and seize the monastic lands (which they promptly sold) thus increasing the wealth in the coffers of England. This resulted in monks begging in the streets and reflected in the lyrics of 'Hark, Hark the dogs do bark'

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Old Jan 27th 2011, 4:49 pm
  #2328  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

I love corned beef patties. I take a tin of corned beef, mix it with mashed potato add onion and grated celery. The I shape it into a patties brush it with egg dip it in bread crumbs and fry it up in a small about of oil. Lovely with cabbage.
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 5:25 pm
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Originally Posted by trottytrue View Post
The term "Taffy" may be a merging of the common Welsh name "Dafydd" and the Welsh river "Taff" on which Cardiff is built, and seems to have been in use by the mid-eighteenth century.[2] The rhyme may be related to one published in Tommy Thumb's Pretty Song Book, printed in London around 1744which had the lyrics:

This version seems to have been particularly popular in the English counties that bordered Wales, where it was sung on Saint David's Day (1 March) complete with leek-wearing effigies of Welshmen.[1] The image of thieving Welshmen seems to have begun to die down by the mid-twentieth century, although the insulting rhyme was, still sometimes used along with the name "Taffy" for any Welshman

Nothing against you Taffy


Here's another one amazing when you look behind the poem and find the history. I have always loved finding the reason for a poem.

Hark hark the dogs do bark
The beggars are coming to town
Some in rags and some in jags*
And one in a velvet gown.

A cautionary tale - Nursery rhyme dates back to 13th century England
The origins of this story, reflected in the lyrics, is seeped in history. Wandering minstrels and beggars went from town to town singing their songs and rhymes - secret messages of dissent were often found in the lyrics and could lead to plots and uprisings against the crown and governments of the day. Dogs barking alerted communities to strangers in their midst, hence the words 'Hark, hark the dogs do bark ...' - " Beware of strangers"

* Jags - A slash or slit in a garment exposing material of a different color (especially popular during the Tudor period.)

Additional Information regarding the history & origin of this rhyme
Out thanks go to Yasmin Mazur for submitting the following possibilities for
'Hark, Hark the dogs do bark'
In 1688 William of Orange brought his Dutch followers to England - it is suggested that the person referred do as being 'one in a velvet gown' was William himself and the beggars referred to his Dutch associates

or

It refers to the Dissolution of the Monasteries (1536 - 1540) perpetrated by King Henry VIII and his chief minister Thomas Cromwell, when England broke from the Catholic religion. Their objective was to loot the monasteries and seize the monastic lands (which they promptly sold) thus increasing the wealth in the coffers of England. This resulted in monks begging in the streets and reflected in the lyrics of 'Hark, Hark the dogs do bark'

Thanks those are interesting tit bits of history you shared.
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 6:03 pm
  #2330  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

I think it was Trotty who said she was using an ipad and having to use her thumb for the key board and that was the reason for slips on her spelling. Now on the last entry I think there was a slip? 'Tit' instead of tid?

On the spam thing. This is very popular in Hawaii and they couldn't get along without it. In the mainland they avoid it because of the high concentrate of sodium.

JTYWLTK.

Cheers
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 7:01 pm
  #2331  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

haha Cheers, but I thought it was tit bits I guess it can be either...

titbit [ˈtɪtˌbɪt] esp US, tidbit
n
1. (Cookery) a tasty small piece of food; dainty
2. a pleasing scrap of anything, such as scandal
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 7:20 pm
  #2332  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Hear ye Hear ye Hear Ye!


Jackie has reported in! Yea!

She is fine and drowning in tea.

Cheers

The town crier




!
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 7:21 pm
  #2333  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Oh brilliant, thanks Cheers!
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 7:54 pm
  #2334  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Originally Posted by charleygirl View Post
haha Cheers, but I thought it was tit bits I guess it can be either...

titbit [ˈtɪtˌbɪt] esp US, tidbit
n
1. (Cookery) a tasty small piece of food; dainty
2. a pleasing scrap of anything, such as scandal
It is titbits, but Americans changed it because of their puritanical streak. Can't say 'tit' out loud!!
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 8:00 pm
  #2335  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Originally Posted by sallysimmons View Post
It is titbits, but Americans changed it because of their puritanical streak. Can't say 'tit' out loud!!
Maybe they could say boobbit instead ... they can say boob can't they
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 8:13 pm
  #2336  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Originally Posted by trottytrue View Post
Jasper123...I think a lot of people do not rotate. I dont, when I was cleaning out my pantry I found packages at least 3 to 4 years out of 'sell by date'. I chucked them making sure that my OH didnt see me doing it. He would have thought it was wasteful and I should be more organized. He is very organized. From now on I shall remember to rotate
When we left the UK in 1977 I left a lot of food with my Mother, when we went back for a visit in 1983 she gave my daughter a packet of crackers to eat from 1977. She was very sick. My Mother didnt think there was anything wrong with them. I find a lot of people in the UK do not store things in the fridge. Well my family. When I mention it to them they tell me I am way to fussy.
My mothers fridge was like a minefield of eat at your own risk foods. She thought because it was in the fridge you could keep it forever. Even if she didnt freeze it. Meat sometimes developed that grey look to it but she still cooked it.

Mallory...I understand not wanting to throw the tin of Custard Powder out. Its like part of your Mum. I have boxes of wool that my Mum sent to me over the years but I have never used it. I still cannot get rid of it. Shall have to find another use for it as I really dont much like knitting anymore.
Trotty and Mallory, I have an old money purse of my Dads, he used to put his loose change in it, you know pennys,halfpennies,farthings,sixpence peaces, shillings, it had two compartments so sometimes he would even put a 10 shilling note in it, or whenever he had one a 1 pound note, ---- Dads been left me now for 22 years, a more kinder gentler man I have not seen ever, and I could never part with that little brown purse,
Rodney.
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 8:28 pm
  #2337  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Originally Posted by sallysimmons View Post
It is titbits, but Americans changed it because of their puritanical streak. Can't say 'tit' out loud!!
What?????

What about our lovely little English birds, blue tits and coal tits and so on.........

Oh I do miss my lovely little, gentle, sweet English birds, now as much as the birds in this country are colourful and amazing they are so LOUD LOL!!
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 8:37 pm
  #2338  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Here's where I heard that - David Mitchell tells Americans how to speak

http://www.boreme.com/boreme/funny-2...america-p1.php

But actually one of the commentors says it's not true:

Maybe he should grab an OED before commenting: "tidbit" is a contraction of "tide bit", "tide" meaning feast. Some of us former colonists know the Queen's English better than most Brits.
So just ignore me and carry on!

Last edited by sallysimmons; Jan 27th 2011 at 8:41 pm.
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 8:48 pm
  #2339  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Originally Posted by Beedubya View Post
Rodney, I found in England nobody keeps eggs, sauces or salad cream in the fridge, I suppose they don't have to as the weather doesn't get as hot as we are used to. That's how my family know I am around as all of the above get put in the fridge plus jam, etc. as I go on auto pilot after 30 years living here.

Have you noticed how small the fridges are?
Well Barb When my Mum came home that afternoon I showed her the cabinets and how tidy and neat they were with so much extra room, guess what this time she actually thanked me for all my hard work, she said that she would never have got around to doing it, and she was pleased that now she could actually find things easily,
And your comment on the 2nd world war yes that makes so much sense doesn't it, sugar was definitely rationed, and so were a lot of things including water, I was born in 1945 one month after hitler commuted suicide with his wife, and as Portsmouth being a dockyard city the town was bombed frequently, and it took a lot of rebuilding for years, and I remember that even as a tiny tot things were still rationed for several years after the war,
yes I have succeeded in putting a lot of stuff in the fridge and they stay there too, like the salad cream/mustard/chutney/ketchup/and other stuff that was always put in the cabinets before I came home, but the eggs Hmmm Mum will always stay stuben on them,
And yeah the fridges are so small compared to what we are used to but its surprising how quickly you get used to them, another thing I have found is that the washing machines are very tiny too, the other day we were at currys and comet checking out the washing machines there --- mum is thinking of buying a new one as hers is about 15 years old or more, any way I noticed that they are much smaller in capacity then ours and the big difference is that all the machines were (FRONT LOADERS) you got to bend down all the way to put the bloody clothes in, in US i was always used to a top loading machine, so easy and you can open up the lid anytime during wash cycle and check things out or if you forgot something you just open up and bung it in I dont think you can even buy a top loader in UK?
Rodney.
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Old Jan 27th 2011, 8:58 pm
  #2340  
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Default Re: OVER 50's & 60's MOVING BACK TO THE UK - Part II

Originally Posted by sallysimmons View Post

So just ignore me and carry on!
We have that here in another former British colony where they use "strange" words to me that are apparently words that were commonly used in the 1800's in Britain but have died out over in the UK........
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