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Naturalised Irish citizens treated differently?

Naturalised Irish citizens treated differently?

Old May 9th 2021, 6:02 pm
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Default Naturalised Irish citizens treated differently?

Was recently looking at various options for EU citizenship due to naturalisation and Ireland caught my attention with what looks like quite different treatment of naturalised citizens.

Do they really have to file Form 5 when moving abroad and overall can they lose their citizenship by making such a move permanent?
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Old May 10th 2021, 11:30 am
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Default Re: Naturalised Irish citizens treated differently?

That is the official info: https://www.irishimmigration.ie/citi...h-citizenship/


Under the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956 as amended, the Minister for Justice has the power to revoke a certificate of naturalisation where an individual has been ordinarily resident outside of the State for seven years after naturalisation, unless;

They have registered annually in the prescribed manner their name and a declaration of an intention to retain Irish citizenship with an Irish diplomatic mission or consular office or with the Minister.

You must complete a “Declaration of Intention to Retain Irish Citizenship” if you reside outside of Ireland, by completing Form 5 annually.
Please complete this form if;
  • You became an Irish Citizen through naturalisation
  • If you have taken up residence outside of Ireland following naturalisation
Make sure you use the most recently published version of each form when making an application or declaration. If you complete an old version of a form, it will be returned to you and you will have to start again.



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Old May 12th 2021, 12:12 pm
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Default Re: Naturalised Irish citizens treated differently?

The way I read it it's a "could" and "has the power to", which means it doesn't happen automatically. The law is most likely designed for those who just go to Ireland, to get naturalised and later on decide to leave again.

What I don't know is what's going to happen to those who claim Irish citizenship by ancestry from overseas and actually live overseas? Most likely that's not even considered naturalization, but ancestry?

Last edited by OrangeMango; May 12th 2021 at 12:14 pm.
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Old May 17th 2021, 4:45 pm
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Default Re: Naturalised Irish citizens treated differently?

Originally Posted by OrangeMango
The way I read it it's a "could" and "has the power to", which means it doesn't happen automatically. The law is most likely designed for those who just go to Ireland, to get naturalised and later on decide to leave again.

What I don't know is what's going to happen to those who claim Irish citizenship by ancestry from overseas and actually live overseas? Most likely that's not even considered naturalization, but ancestry?
It's a immigration law. Who would want to test its enforcement?

Citizenship by ancestry is treated differently, as its not acquired by 5y residence.
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Old May 23rd 2021, 7:20 pm
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Default Re: Naturalised Irish citizens treated differently?

Originally Posted by EU.flag
It's a immigration law. Who would want to test its enforcement?

Citizenship by ancestry is treated differently, as its not acquired by 5y residence.
The thing is, every country has the right to decide how and to whom they award citizenship and in what way.

Enforcement in this case is probably not something automatic, but more random. One doesn't want to test it either. Most likely you would have to have a tax declaration, a P60, a P45, or a letting agreement or any kind of household bills in your name. As not everybody has an income, or must have an income, - if they are living off savings, etc... - than it's most likely not enforced just by your income tax.
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