Go Back  British Expats > Usenet Groups > rec.travel.* > rec.travel.europe
Reload this Page >

What to see and do in Reims?

What to see and do in Reims?

Old Oct 7th 2004, 5:15 am
  #16  
Anonymous
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

    >>Reims as you should know by now is the center of the Champagne industry and
    >>the home to the Cathedral with the smiling angel. This Cathedral is noted
    >>as "THE" place for the coronation of all french kings since the baptism of
    >>Clovis ages ago. Jeanne d'Arc may have been the maid of Orleans but Reims
    >>with the Dauphin in tow was her goal.
    >>Two days in Reims would be great for me but you mileage may vary.


    > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At that
    > time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a friend of me
    > would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures have flight time."

Joanne didn't "follow" the army.

she LEAD the army.



--
Lienad Inc. .45/.410 Derringer Parts Kit
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=7106059206
1911 Recoil Compensator Bushing
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=7106431142
 
Old Oct 7th 2004, 10:25 am
  #17  
Devil
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 12:08:45 -0500, anonymous wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > the cathedral
    >
    > definitely the cathedral (and the museum etc attached to it)
    >
    > this is where St. Joan of Arc took the young Dauphin to have him crowned
    > King of the Franks.

I think by then it had been king of *France* for quite a while already...

1000 years or so, given or take a couple hundreds.
 
Old Oct 7th 2004, 10:25 am
  #18  
Devil
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 12:15:55 -0500, anonymous wrote:

    >
    >>>Reims as you should know by now is the center of the Champagne industry and
    >>>the home to the Cathedral with the smiling angel. This Cathedral is noted
    >>>as "THE" place for the coronation of all french kings since the baptism of
    >>>Clovis ages ago. Jeanne d'Arc may have been the maid of Orleans but Reims
    >>>with the Dauphin in tow was her goal.
    >>>Two days in Reims would be great for me but you mileage may vary.
    >
    >
    >> As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At that
    >> time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a friend of me
    >> would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures have flight time."
    >
    > Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    >
    > she LEAD the army.

Eventually. But she had been following in her earlier career.
 
Old Oct 7th 2004, 6:53 pm
  #19  
Agena 2003
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

non-smoking restaurants in Reims
http://smokefreeplaces.net/en/FR/51/reims
a smoker hates his Neighbour as himself
 
Old Oct 9th 2004, 5:50 am
  #20  
Poldy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

In article <[email protected]>,
anonymous <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >>Reims as you should know by now is the center of the Champagne industry and
    > >>the home to the Cathedral with the smiling angel. This Cathedral is noted
    > >>as "THE" place for the coronation of all french kings since the baptism of
    > >>Clovis ages ago. Jeanne d'Arc may have been the maid of Orleans but Reims
    > >>with the Dauphin in tow was her goal.
    > >>
    > >>Two days in Reims would be great for me but you mileage may vary.
    >
    >
    > > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At that
    > > time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a friend of me
    > > would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures have flight time."
    >
    > Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    >
    > she LEAD the army.

Who's Joanne?
 
Old Oct 9th 2004, 5:54 am
  #21  
Jcoulter
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

poldy <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > anonymous <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> >>Reims as you should know by now is the center of the Champagne
    >> >>industry and the home to the Cathedral with the smiling angel. This
    >> >>Cathedral is noted as "THE" place for the coronation of all french
    >> >>kings since the baptism of Clovis ages ago. Jeanne d'Arc may have
    >> >>been the maid of Orleans but Reims with the Dauphin in tow was her
    >> >>goal.
    >> >>
    >> >>Two days in Reims would be great for me but you mileage may vary.
    >>
    >>
    >> > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At
    >> > that time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a
    >> > friend of me would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures
    >> > have flight time."
    >>
    >> Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    >>
    >> she LEAD the army.
    >
    > Who's Joanne?
    >

Jeanne d'Arc the maid of Orleans thought be some to have been a witch
and by some here to have been less than chaste. (I would have thought
that the good nuns in Potiers would have had a look at that but perhpas
not lol)
 
Old Oct 9th 2004, 5:57 am
  #22  
nitram
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

On Sat, 09 Oct 2004 12:54:12 -0500, jcoulter
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Who's Joanne?

why are people spelling Joan/Jeanne as Joanne?
    >>
    >Jeanne d'Arc the maid of Orleans thought be some to have been a witch
    >and by some here to have been less than chaste.

or even chased?


    >(I would have thought
    >that the good nuns in Potiers would have had a look
    > at that but perhpas
    >not lol

Are you suggesting that the good nuns of Poitiers were voyeurs?

I think I've seen the video :-)

)
 
Old Oct 11th 2004, 9:18 am
  #23  
Poldy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

In article <[email protected]>,
jcoulter <[email protected]> wrote:

    > poldy <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:

    > >> > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At
    > >> > that time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a
    > >> > friend of me would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures
    > >> > have flight time."
    > >>
    > >> Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    > >>
    > >> she LEAD the army.
    > >
    > > Who's Joanne?
    > >
    >
    > Jeanne d'Arc the maid of Orleans thought be some to have been a witch
    > and by some here to have been less than chaste. (I would have thought
    > that the good nuns in Potiers would have had a look at that but perhpas
    > not lol)

I know who Jeanne d'Arc and Joan of Arc were.

Who the heck is Joanne?
 
Old Oct 11th 2004, 9:21 am
  #24  
nitram
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 21:18:50 GMT, poldy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > jcoulter <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> poldy <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >> >> > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At
    >> >> > that time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a
    >> >> > friend of me would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures
    >> >> > have flight time."
    >> >>
    >> >> Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    >> >>
    >> >> she LEAD the army.
    >> >
    >> > Who's Joanne?
    >> >
    >>
    >> Jeanne d'Arc the maid of Orleans thought be some to have been a witch
    >> and by some here to have been less than chaste. (I would have thought
    >> that the good nuns in Potiers would have had a look at that but perhpas
    >> not lol)
    >I know who Jeanne d'Arc and Joan of Arc were.
    >Who the heck is Joanne?

The Dauphin's nanny.
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 8:30 am
  #25  
Meurgues
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

jcoulter <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>.. .
    > poldy <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > anonymous <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> >>Reims as you should know by now is the center of the Champagne
    > >> >>industry and the home to the Cathedral with the smiling angel. This
    > >> >>Cathedral is noted as "THE" place for the coronation of all french
    > >> >>kings since the baptism of Clovis ages ago. Jeanne d'Arc may have
    > >> >>been the maid of Orleans but Reims with the Dauphin in tow was her
    > >> >>goal.
    > >> >>
    > >> >>Two days in Reims would be great for me but you mileage may vary.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At
    > >> > that time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a
    > >> > friend of me would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures
    > >> > have flight time."
    > >>
    > >> Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    > >>
    > >> she LEAD the army.
    > >
    > > Who's Joanne?
    > >
    >
    > Jeanne d'Arc the maid of Orleans thought be some to have been a witch

It was a necessity for the king of England to bring her before a witch
tribunal instead of a penal (or perhaps military tribunal) for the
very reason that she had succeeded to cross without troubles the
occupied zone and to make the Dauphin CROWNED IN RHEIMS first, before
him, because in medieval times the people was very superstitious and
considered this as a sign and in a monarchy of divine right... as the
will of god. A coronation made with the help of a witch would have
discredited it. That's why her condemnation to life emprisonment after
her first trial by a rather magnanimous or impressed tribunal wasn't
sufficient for him. In order to make her betray her solemn oath, which
in a witch trial was of course not insignificant..., including the one
to not wear men clothes again, she was consequently deliberatly denied
the right to receive communion in her cell, which lead her in
protestation to wear men clothes in oder to find help, the lightest
sin did she probably think, which on the contrary lead her to a well
needed death condemnation on the stake at her second trial. So that's
because she was pious and probably to excess (1), asking for ex. for
benedictions at any rate on the battlefield or if you consider her
"voices", that she died, in fact for a reason of faith, and why she
was later beatified. (1) Excessively, like Ste Thérese de Lisieux if
you want, and if you read her trial's answers.

    > and by some here to have been less than chaste. (I would have thought
    > that the good nuns in Poitiers would have had a look at that but perhaps
    > not lol)

I don't think that she was exactly in the "army" before the one given
to her by the Dauphin, after he was impressed when she recognised him
among his courtisans in Chinon and after her virginity was effectively
checked at Poitiers because of the prophecy "predicting" that France
would be saved by a young (indeed...) maiden.

didier Meurgues
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 10:13 am
  #26  
Devil
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 13:30:41 -0700, meurgues wrote:

    > jcoulter <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>.. .
    >> poldy <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > anonymous <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> >>Reims as you should know by now is the center of the Champagne
    >> >> >>industry and the home to the Cathedral with the smiling angel. This
    >> >> >>Cathedral is noted as "THE" place for the coronation of all french
    >> >> >>kings since the baptism of Clovis ages ago. Jeanne d'Arc may have
    >> >> >>been the maid of Orleans but Reims with the Dauphin in tow was her
    >> >> >>goal.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >>Two days in Reims would be great for me but you mileage may vary.
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At
    >> >> > that time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a
    >> >> > friend of me would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures
    >> >> > have flight time."
    >> >>
    >> >> Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    >> >>
    >> >> she LEAD the army.
    >> >
    >> > Who's Joanne?
    >> >
    >>
    >> Jeanne d'Arc the maid of Orleans thought be some to have been a witch
    >
    > It was a necessity for the king of England to bring her before a witch
    > tribunal instead of a penal (or perhaps military tribunal) for the
    > very reason that she had succeeded to cross without troubles the
    > occupied zone and to make the Dauphin CROWNED IN RHEIMS first, before
    > him, because in medieval times the people was very superstitious and
    > considered this as a sign and in a monarchy of divine right... as the
    > will of god. A coronation made with the help of a witch would have
    > discredited it. That's why her condemnation to life emprisonment after
    > her first trial by a rather magnanimous or impressed tribunal wasn't
    > sufficient for him. In order to make her betray her solemn oath, which
    > in a witch trial was of course not insignificant..., including the one
    > to not wear men clothes again, she was consequently deliberatly denied
    > the right to receive communion in her cell, which lead her in
    > protestation to wear men clothes in oder to find help, the lightest
    > sin did she probably think, which on the contrary lead her to a well
    > needed death condemnation on the stake at her second trial. So that's
    > because she was pious and probably to excess (1), asking for ex. for
    > benedictions at any rate on the battlefield or if you consider her
    > "voices", that she died, in fact for a reason of faith, and why she
    > was later beatified. (1) Excessively, like Ste Thérese de Lisieux if
    > you want, and if you read her trial's answers.

Well, I have never seen someone who "heard voices" and who was not some
sort of a witch. :-)


    >> and by some here to have been less than chaste. (I would have thought
    >> that the good nuns in Poitiers would have had a look at that but
    >> perhaps not lol)

Which nuns in Poitiers would that have been? Same ones as in the St.
Radegonde dragon story? About these nice fresh novices who had encounters
with (the) dragon(s) in the basement until St. Radegonde took it upon
herself to kill the beast?

(If that's the case, I would take their expertise on maidenhood to be
somewhat biased...)

    > I don't think that she was exactly in the "army" before the one given to
    > her by the Dauphin, after he was impressed when she recognised him among
    > his courtisans in Chinon and after her virginity was effectively checked
    > at Poitiers because of the prophecy "predicting" that France would be
    > saved by a young (indeed...) maiden.


I always heard she had been "following the armies" before she found her
destiny?

As you say, this prophesy thing would have been more than reason enough
for her to rediscover her maidenhood?
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 11:43 am
  #27  
Dave Smith
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

William Dieterich wrote:

    > If you are into world war I history, you are around 1 hour drive from Verdun.

We went to Verdun after Reims and had a very interesting visit of the
battlefield. It may be of interest to American tourists as it is close to the
Argonne where American forces fought and there are several American military
cemeteries in the area. The scenery is quite pleasant.
 
Old Oct 19th 2004, 6:03 am
  #28  
Anonymous
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

Hi,

the whole area is a virtual treasure trove for those interested in WW-I.

my best suggestion (other than visiting the american cemeteries to chat
with the old soldiers, they don't get many visitors anymore) is to just
drive around and visit the small towns, visit the town cemetery... read
the names, the lists of names.... "tiré par les Allemands"...

stop at the lone crosses sitting on the edge of an empty field... see
who died there in no man's land.

and light a candle for Saint Joan at the Cathedral.

her chapel is on the left toward the back.

ttyl

akia

Dave Smith wrote:

    > William Dieterich wrote:
    >
    >
    >>If you are into world war I history, you are around 1 hour drive from Verdun.
    >
    >
    > We went to Verdun after Reims and had a very interesting visit of the
    > battlefield. It may be of interest to American tourists as it is close to the
    > Argonne where American forces fought and there are several American military
    > cemeteries in the area. The scenery is quite pleasant.
    >

--


Lienad .45/.410 Single Shot Derringer Parts Kit
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=7108657274
 
Old Oct 20th 2004, 8:20 am
  #29  
Meurgues
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

devil <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected] >...
    > On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 13:30:41 -0700, meurgues wrote:
    >
    > > jcoulter <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>.. .
    > >> poldy <[email protected]> wrote in
    > >> news:[email protected]:
    > >>
    > >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> > anonymous <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> >>Reims as you should know by now is the center of the Champagne
    > >> >> >>industry and the home to the Cathedral with the smiling angel. This
    > >> >> >>Cathedral is noted as "THE" place for the coronation of all french
    > >> >> >>kings since the baptism of Clovis ages ago. Jeanne d'Arc may have
    > >> >> >>been the maid of Orleans but Reims with the Dauphin in tow was her
    > >> >> >>goal.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >>Two days in Reims would be great for me but you mileage may vary.
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >> > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At
    > >> >> > that time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a
    > >> >> > friend of me would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures
    > >> >> > have flight time."
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> she LEAD the army.
    > >> >
    > >> > Who's Joanne?
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> Jeanne d'Arc the maid of Orleans thought be some to have been a witch
    > >
    > > It was a necessity for the king of England to bring her before a witch
    > > tribunal instead of a penal (or perhaps military tribunal) for the
    > > very reason that she had succeeded to cross without troubles the
    > > occupied zone and to make the Dauphin CROWNED IN RHEIMS first, before
    > > him, because in medieval times the people was very superstitious and
    > > considered this as a sign and in a monarchy of divine right... as the
    > > will of god. A coronation made with the help of a witch would have
    > > discredited it. That's why her condemnation to life emprisonment after
    > > her first trial by a rather magnanimous or impressed tribunal wasn't
    > > sufficient for him. In order to make her betray her solemn oath, which
    > > in a witch trial was of course not insignificant..., including the one
    > > to not wear men clothes again, she was consequently deliberatly denied
    > > the right to receive communion in her cell, which lead her in
    > > protestation to wear men clothes in oder to find help, the lightest
    > > sin did she probably think, which on the contrary lead her to a well
    > > needed death condemnation on the stake at her second trial. So that's
    > > because she was pious and probably to excess (1), asking for ex. for
    > > benedictions at any rate on the battlefield or if you consider her
    > > "voices", that she died, in fact for a reason of faith, and why she
    > > was later canonized. (1) Excessively, like Ste Thérese de Lisieux if
    > > you want, and if you read her trial's answers of which I've seen only few lines.
    >
    > Well, I have never seen someone who "heard voices" and who was not some
    > sort of a witch. :-)
    >
    >
    > >> and by some here to have been less than chaste. (I would have thought
    > >> that the good nuns in Poitiers would have had a look at that but
    > >> perhaps not lol)
    >
    > Which nuns in Poitiers would that have been? Same ones as in the St.
    > Radegonde dragon story? About these nice fresh novices who had encounters
    > with (the) dragon(s) in the basement until St. Radegonde took it upon
    > herself to kill the beast?

This "legend", concerns Ste Radegonde dead in 587 AD. Here is the
"Beast" : http://www.mairie-poitiers.fr/rubriq...que_menu=0.6.3
An englishman... wrote in the 1600ies that he saw the corpse of a
crocodile, (perhaps brought from Africa as a baby centuries before)
    :+) and the others... :
http://www.cssh.qc.ca/projets/carnet...u-dragons.html

It should be necessary to read Jeanne's trial to know the answer. I
just know that they were women. I think that they were nuns as you
mentionned yourself. But I don't know if their convent was exactly in
Poitiers (Ste Croix, Ste trinité,...) or if they were invited to go
there just for the checking.

    > (If that's the case, I would take their expertise on maidenhood to be
    > somewhat biased...)
    >
    > > I don't think that she was exactly in the "army" before the one given to
    > > her by the Dauphin, after he was impressed when she recognised him among
    > > his courtisans in Chinon and after her virginity was effectively checked
    > > at Poitiers because of the prophecy "predicting" that France would be
    > > saved by a young (indeed...) maiden.

I just "heard" that she learned the use of weapons with Robert de
Baudricourt in Vaucouleurs, near her home, some few years after she
first heard her "voices" (St Michael and Ste Marguerite...)(like Ste
Bernadette...) at the age of 13 and before she went to Chinon at the
age of 17, and that she was VERY pious.

didier meurgues

    > I always heard she had been "following the armies" before she found her
    > destiny?
    >
    > As you say, this prophesy thing would have been more than reason enough
    > for her to rediscover her maidenhood?
 
Old Oct 20th 2004, 9:54 pm
  #30  
Meurgues
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to see and do in Reims?

[email protected] (meurgues) wrote in message news:<[email protected]. com>...
    > devil <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected] >...
    > > On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 13:30:41 -0700, meurgues wrote:
    > >
    > > > jcoulter <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>.. .
    > > >> poldy <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > >> news:[email protected]:
    > > >>
    > > >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > >> > anonymous <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >> >
    > > >> >> >>Reims as you should know by now is the center of the Champagne
    > > >> >> >>industry and the home to the Cathedral with the smiling angel. This
    > > >> >> >>Cathedral is noted as "THE" place for the coronation of all french
    > > >> >> >>kings since the baptism of Clovis ages ago. Jeanne d'Arc may have
    > > >> >> >>been the maid of Orleans but Reims with the Dauphin in tow was her
    > > >> >> >>goal.
    > > >> >> >>
    > > >> >> >>Two days in Reims would be great for me but you mileage may vary.
    > > >> >>
    > > >> >>
    > > >> >> > As to Joanne having been a maid, I got a bridge to sell you. At
    > > >> >> > that time, women whose business was to follow armies tended, as a
    > > >> >> > friend of me would put it, to "have more bed hours than vultures
    > > >> >> > have flight time."
    > > >> >>
    > > >> >> Joanne didn't "follow" the army.
    > > >> >>
    > > >> >> she LEAD the army.
    > > >> >
    > > >> > Who's Joanne?
    > > >> >
    > > >>
    > > >> Jeanne d'Arc the maid of Orleans thought be some to have been a witch
    > > >
    > > > It was a necessity for the king of England to bring her before a witch
    > > > tribunal instead of a penal (or perhaps military tribunal) for the
    > > > very reason that she had succeeded to cross without troubles the
    > > > occupied zone and to make the Dauphin CROWNED IN RHEIMS first, before
    > > > him, because in medieval times the people was very superstitious and
    > > > considered this as a sign and in a monarchy of divine right... as the
    > > > will of god. A coronation made with the help of a witch would have
    > > > discredited it. That's why her condemnation to life emprisonment after
    > > > her first trial by a rather magnanimous or impressed tribunal wasn't
    > > > sufficient for him. In order to make her betray her solemn oath, which
    > > > in a witch trial was of course not insignificant..., including the one
    > > > to not wear men clothes again, she was consequently deliberatly denied
    > > > the right to receive communion in her cell, which lead her in
    > > > protestation to wear men clothes in oder to find help, the lightest
    > > > sin did she probably think, which on the contrary lead her to a well
    > > > needed death condemnation on the stake at her second trial. So that's
    > > > because she was pious and probably to excess (1), asking for ex. for
    > > > benedictions at any rate on the battlefield or if you consider her
    > > > "voices", that she died, in fact for a reason of faith, and why she
    > > > was later canonized. (1) Excessively, like Ste Thérese de Lisieux if
    > > > you want, and if you read her trial's answers of which I've seen only few lines.
    > >
    > > Well, I have never seen someone who "heard voices" and who was not some
    > > sort of a witch. :-)
    > >
    > >
    > > >> and by some here to have been less than chaste. (I would have thought
    > > >> that the good nuns in Poitiers would have had a look at that but
    > > >> perhaps not lol)
    > >
    > > Which nuns in Poitiers would that have been? Same ones as in the St.
    > > Radegonde dragon story? About these nice fresh novices who had encounters
    > > with (the) dragon(s) in the basement until St. Radegonde took it upon
    > > herself to kill the beast?
    >
    > This "legend", concerns Ste Radegonde dead in 587 AD. Here is the
    > "Beast" : http://www.mairie-poitiers.fr/rubriq...que_menu=0.6.3
    > An englishman... wrote in the 1600ies that he saw the corpse of a
    > crocodile, (perhaps brought from Africa as a baby centuries before)
    > :+) and the others... :
    > http://www.cssh.qc.ca/projets/carnet...u-dragons.html
    >
    > It should be necessary to read Jeanne's trial to know the answer. I
    > just know that they were women. I think that they were nuns as you
    > mentionned yourself. But I don't know if their convent was exactly in
    > Poitiers (Ste Croix, Ste trinité,...) or if they were invited to go
    > there just for the checking.
    >
    > > (If that's the case, I would take their expertise on maidenhood to be
    > > somewhat biased...)
    > >
    > > > I don't think that she was exactly in the "army" before the one given to
    > > > her by the Dauphin, after he was impressed when she recognised him among
    > > > his courtisans in Chinon and after her virginity was effectively checked
    > > > at Poitiers because of the prophecy "predicting" that France would be
    > > > saved by a young (indeed...) maiden.
    >
    > I just "heard" that she learned the use of weapons with Robert de
    > Baudricourt in Vaucouleurs, near her home, some few years after she
    > first heard her "voices" (St Michael and

Ste CATHERINE not Marguerite...)(like Ste

    > Bernadette...) at the age of 13 and before she went to Chinon at the
    > age of 17, and that she was VERY pious.
    >
    > didier meurgues
    >
    > > I always heard she had been "following the armies" before she found her
    > > destiny?
    > >
    > > As you say, this prophesy thing would have been more than reason enough
    > > for her to rediscover her maidenhood?
 

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.