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US tv networks in Europe

US tv networks in Europe

Old Jul 27th 2004, 3:10 am
  #16  
Olivers
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

Shawn Hearn extrapolated from data available...

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Surfbandido) wrote:
    >
    >> Is it possible to wacth NBC, CBS ....... with some sort of satellite
    >> setup in places like Spain, France or Italy?. Thank you.
    >
    > Depends on where you are staying, but why in the world travel all the
    > way to Europe and waste time watching American television?
    >

Years ago, I can remember spending time in a little Scottish community in
which the only pub in town became a community theater for the weekly
viewing of "Dallas". Not a word could be said, and no glass filled so that
the background noise was minimized as folks peered at the flickering
screen.

We may laugh about 'Merkin TV, but should never understimate its appeal in
some European markets.

....But thne I never thought I would see pubs full of Brits holding
Budweider bottles...Waagh!.

TMO
 
Old Jul 27th 2004, 4:32 am
  #17  
Sufaud
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

John Bermont <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > AFN is Armed Forces Network. You can watch it if you have an American
    > NTSC TV and live near a US military base which broadcasts it. It is
    > geared to the people in uniform and thus you'll get sports, idiot
    > sit-coms, and news (from one or more of the networks IIRC).
    >

If you are, or have a household member who is, retired military, Coast
Guard or Public Health Service, you can buy or rent a decoder and
watch AFN at home:

http://www.afrts.osd.mil/

http://www.sciatl.com/products/custo...ent_AFRTS2.htm

http://www.aafes.com/docs/setup.pdf

Numerous channels, so there's bound to be a US program of interest at
any given time.
 
Old Jul 27th 2004, 4:40 am
  #18  
barney
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (Shawn Hearn) wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Surfbandido) wrote:
    >
    > > Is it possible to wacth NBC, CBS ....... with some sort of satellite
    > > setup in
    > > places like Spain, France or Italy?. Thank you.
    >
    > Depends on where you are staying, but why in the world travel all the
    > way to Europe and waste time watching American television?

The OP could be moving here to work or study.
 
Old Jul 27th 2004, 10:39 am
  #19  
Poldy
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

In article <[email protected]>,
Shawn Hearn <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Surfbandido) wrote:
    >
    > > Is it possible to wacth NBC, CBS ....... with some sort of satellite setup
    > > in
    > > places like Spain, France or Italy?. Thank you.
    >
    > Depends on where you are staying, but why in the world travel all the
    > way to Europe and waste time watching American television?

Because American TV is already on many of the local channels, usually
dubbed but still the same shows?
 
Old Jul 27th 2004, 3:35 pm
  #20  
EvelynVogtGamble
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

Sufaud wrote:


    > If you are, or have a household member who is, retired military, Coast
    > Guard or Public Health Service, you can buy or rent a decoder and
    > watch AFN at home:
    >
    > Numerous channels, so there's bound to be a US program of interest at
    > any given time.

Considering how little there is worth watching on American TV in it's
home country (even with the zillion additional channels available on
cable) I beg leave to doubt that!
 
Old Jul 28th 2004, 5:15 am
  #21  
Sufaud
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Considering how little there is worth watching on American TV in it's
    > home country

Where to stick grocer's apostrophe

John Ezard, arts correspondent
Thursday July 8, 2004
The Guardian

We have finally got the hang of the grocer's apostrophe. But we still
have little clue how to defuse, or diffuse, our other hang-ups about
the correct use of words - and computer spellcheckers only make our
task harder.

This is today's (not todays) verdict from Oxford University Press. It
reports evidence from its 300m-word database of "a new kind of
problem" among otherwise relatively literate people.

One of the epidemic errors of the past 30 years - unnecessary,
misplaced or omitted apostrophes in the words "its"and "it's" - has
dwindled to only about 8% of people, possibly because the mistake has
drawn so much ridicule. It was dubbed "the grocer's apostrophe"
because of its unnecessary use in plural words on shop signs or
placards (Price's Slashed).

But it has been replaced by misuse of "diffuse" or "defuse" (as in "A
coach can diffuse the situation by praising the players").

Research for the new Concise Oxford English Dictionary, published
today, found that this word crime was committed in some 50% of
examples on the database. It is now rated as the commonest in the
language.

Second commonest is uncertainty over when to use "rein" or "reign",
found in 26% of examples, as in "A taxi driver had free reign to
charge whatever he likes".

Third most frequent (21%) is "tow" instead of "toe", as in "Some
pointed to his refusal to tow the line under Tony Blair". Fourth (12%)
is "pouring" instead of "poring", as in "He spent his evenings pouring
over western art magazines".

Other common confusions include pedal and peddle, draw and drawer,
compliment and complement and their, there and they're.

Angus Stevenson, of OUP dictionaries, said yesterday: "This seems to
be something of a new situation. These errors are occurring in texts
that are otherwise quite well spelt, possibly because of the
increasing use of spellcheckers. Spellcheckers can tell you whether a
word is correctly spelt - but not whether it is properly used.

"Also, we find that people are picking up words and phrases from the
media and bolting them together into fully formed sentences."

The OUP database contains mainly written word usages. To measure
speech, it used to include recordings from radio but now takes
examples from the internet instead.

"People are increasingly writing on the internet as if it was a spoken
rather than a written medium, with all the mistakes which arise
through doing that," Mr Stevenson said.

Newly coined, or revived, words and phrases printed for the first time
in the latest Concise dictionary include metrosexual (used about David
Beckham and others), sex up, congestion charge, health tourism, pole
dancing, speed dating and threequel (a second sequel).


http://books.guardian.co.uk/news/art...256469,00.html
 
Old Jul 28th 2004, 4:44 pm
  #22  
EvelynVogtGamble
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

Sufaud wrote:

    > "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >
    >>Considering how little there is worth watching on American TV in it's
    >>home country
    >
    >
    > Where to stick grocer's apostrophe

How clever of you! For the first time in hundreds of posts I misplaced
a comma, and you caught it. Now aren't you proud of yourself?
 
Old Jul 29th 2004, 5:57 am
  #23  
Tim Kroesen
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

Is "merkin TV" similar to 'nigger' or 'jew' TV, dunderhead?

Tim K

"Olivers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Shawn Hearn extrapolated from data available...
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > [email protected] (Surfbandido) wrote:
    > >
    > >> Is it possible to wacth NBC, CBS ....... with some sort of
satellite
    > >> setup in places like Spain, France or Italy?. Thank you.
    > >
    > > Depends on where you are staying, but why in the world travel all
the
    > > way to Europe and waste time watching American television?
    > >
    > Years ago, I can remember spending time in a little Scottish community
in
    > which the only pub in town became a community theater for the weekly
    > viewing of "Dallas". Not a word could be said, and no glass filled so
that
    > the background noise was minimized as folks peered at the flickering
    > screen.
    > We may laugh about 'Merkin TV, but should never understimate its
appeal in
    > some European markets.
    > ....But thne I never thought I would see pubs full of Brits holding
    > Budweider bottles...Waagh!.
    > TMO
 
Old Jul 29th 2004, 6:24 pm
  #24  
Tim Challenger
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 17:57:45 GMT, Tim Kroesen wrote:

    > Is "merkin TV" similar to 'nigger' or 'jew' TV, dunderhead?

Not in the UK. Dunderhead.
It's generally just a pisstake of the way 'murcans (or merkins) speak. The
similarity between that and an archaic word for **** is purely coincidental
(but sometimes useful). In the same way I take the piss out of a mate of
mine for having lived in the state of Flahda.

--
Tim C.
 
Old Jul 30th 2004, 1:14 am
  #25  
Eloy van Herckenrode
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

"Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected] link.net>...
    > EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque) wrote:
    >
    > > This is probably a silly question, but if you're spending all the money
    > > a trip to Europe will cost you, wouldn't you rather use your time to see
    > > the country, not to watch TV in your hotel room?
    >
    >
    > Yup...I don't watch the crappy US channels at home so why would I want to
    > see them whilst travelling? Besides which it's pretty easy to keep up with
    > the news via the internet...there are plenty of internet cafes, etc. all
    > around. And of course there is always the BBC as you mentioned...and
    > English language press in many places.

And if one has a laptop with the proper gear and setup he/she could
just go and sit on a bench in one of the "larger" (western) European
cities and use the free-roaming wireless services.
 
Old Jul 30th 2004, 2:33 am
  #26  
Olivers
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

Tim Kroesen extrapolated from data available...

    > Is "merkin TV" similar to 'nigger' or 'jew' TV, dunderhead?
    >

You are a paranoid little shit, aren't you?

Whatever grasp of reality you might have had, often marginal, is certainly
suspect if you equate the use of 'merkin with the employment of the racist
or ethnic slurs. Not only are you childish, understandable based on the
low level of maturity you communicate and a walking bad advertsiement for
the US based on your hypersensitivity, you're worse a gormless twit, your
brain over-exposed to unshielded leaks from your over-employed microwave.

TMO
 
Old Jul 30th 2004, 9:48 am
  #27  
Tim Kroesen
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

You're not going to get away using that US pejorative here any more.
Grasp that reality...

Tim K

"Olivers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Tim Kroesen extrapolated from data available...
    > > Is "merkin TV" similar to 'nigger' or 'jew' TV, dunderhead?
    > >
    > You are a paranoid little shit, aren't you?
    > Whatever grasp of reality you might have had, often marginal, is
certainly
    > suspect if you equate the use of 'merkin with the employment of the
racist
    > or ethnic slurs. Not only are you childish, understandable based on
the
    > low level of maturity you communicate and a walking bad advertsiement
for
    > the US based on your hypersensitivity, you're worse a gormless twit,
your
    > brain over-exposed to unshielded leaks from your over-employed
microwave.
    > TMO
 
Old Jul 30th 2004, 9:38 pm
  #28  
Sjoerd
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

"Tim Kroesen" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
news:[email protected]...
    > "Olivers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Tim Kroesen extrapolated from data available...
    > >
    > > > Is "merkin TV" similar to 'nigger' or 'jew' TV, dunderhead?
    > > >
    > >
    > > You are a paranoid little shit, aren't you?
    > >
    > > Whatever grasp of reality you might have had, often marginal, is
    > certainly
    > > suspect if you equate the use of 'merkin with the employment of the
    > racist
    > > or ethnic slurs. Not only are you childish, understandable based on
    > the
    > > low level of maturity you communicate and a walking bad advertsiement
    > for
    > > the US based on your hypersensitivity, you're worse a gormless twit,
    > your
    > > brain over-exposed to unshielded leaks from your over-employed
    > microwave.

    > You're not going to get away using that US pejorative here any more.
    > Grasp that reality...
    > Tim K

I love nothing more than when two right wing 'murkin bigots are fighting
with each other.......

Sjoerd
 
Old Aug 1st 2004, 9:57 am
  #29  
Tim Kroesen
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Default Re: US tv networks in Europe

I love those pissy and lispy little homosexual cat fights too! Thank
the Gay Entertainment Gods for 'Queer Eye' and 'Queer as Folk'...<g>

Now that we are truly liberated we may with clear conscience laugh
publicly and out loud at homosexuals and their foibles; same as with
heteros or politicos!

Tim K

"Sjoerd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > I love nothing more than when two right wing 'murkin bigots are
fighting
    > with each other.......
    > Sjoerd
 

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