Teenagers in Rome

Old Sep 21st 2004, 11:48 pm
  #46  
Sacha
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

On 22/9/04 11:22, in article [email protected],
"minelli374" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Sacha" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:BD76FE46.4827%[email protected] k...
    >> Really? That wasn't my impression of Rome at all nor is it that of my
    >> Italian sister in law. I was thinking of the major and well known areas,
    >> not off in the back streets somewhere and certainly not at night.
    >
    > I live near Milan and I wouldn't suggest anyone to let a boy alone in an
    > Italian big city. People are not very polite, traffic jam is really
    > dangerous because we don't obey limit and traffic rules and police control
    > il very poor.
    > Italian drivers don't respect light, never stop at crossowalk and so,
    > expecially in the south of the Country.
    > It's plenty of immigrants who spend their days drinkin', pissin' and hanging
    > around.
    > Then you have to consider that people have a strong accent there and the 14
    > y.o boy doesn't know a word of Italian.
    >
    > I consider Rome one of the less safe city in Italy, after Naples.
    >
I think there's some misunderstanding here and if so it's probably because I
wasn't clear enough. I'm not suggesting just leaving a child and going off
for the whole day so that he is alone. I didn't really think it necessary to
say that - sorry!
What I was thinking of was that for the shorter tours they do, his parents
could - perhaps - leave him in a café where he could read, play with his
Gameboy or whatever they have now - and then join him there again. For
example, I seem to remember that at St Peter ad Vincula, there is a little
café where he could sit and wait for what is quite a short tour.
He would not be crossing busy roads alone, he would not be wandering the
city alone and he can at 14, easily learn to ask for a drink or an icecream
or a plate of pasta!

As I say, providing he's to be trusted to stay put (and only his parents can
decide that) this is one possible solution to their problem, if not the most
desirable. A lot depends on the nature of the child. But if they are
going to do very long trips or tours, then there are three choices, IMO; he
goes along whether he likes it or not, he stays in the hotel with the front
desk lavishly tipped to make sure he does, or they take a private tour with
a driver recommended by the hotel and the boy stays in the car with the
driver and the books and the Gameboy etc. etc.
Only the family themselves can really figure out what will work best for
them. I'd favour the latter myself but again, so much depends on time,
finances etc. Apart from anything else, sometimes, with a private driver,
it's possible to visit or to see out-of-the-way little things that
mainstream coach tours don't cover, especially if time is limited.
But for something like the Vatican museum and Sistine chapel, I'd say the
only choice is he goes with them or stays in the hotel. That took us over 3
hours, I think and another time, and if possible, I'd visit the Sistine
Chapel only, frankly.

--

Sacha
 
Old Sep 21st 2004, 11:51 pm
  #47  
Sacha
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

On 22/9/04 12:08, in article [email protected],
"[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 08:55:40 +0100, Sacha
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 22/9/04 7:26, in article [email protected], "Q" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> This is the last week of a month trip to places he does want to go. Leaving
    >>> him home is not an option though he did suggest that I give him the cost of
    >>> the trip and leave him to fend for himself.
    >>>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >> If he's *really* determined not to enjoy it, take along books and games and
    >> don't give them to him until you get to Rome. Then 'park' him at a café or
    >> in the hotel and let him get on with it. As long as he has your mobile
    >> 'phone numbers and knows his way to your hotel, he'll be fine. He'll even
    >> see it as an adventure, especially if he learns enough Italian phrases to
    >> ask for an ice cream, a coke, etc.
    >> But I must say that in your shoes, I would also point out to him *very*
    >> firmly though in the nicest way, that he's had 3 weeks of doing things he
    >> *does* enjoy and that he's not going to be allowed to spoil this for you.
    >
    > IME it's just a phase teenage boys go through. I don't think there is
    > any easy solution, other than sending him off an a holiday with kids
    > of his own age, which is probably what he really wants.

There is one other possible solution, though it seems a bit dramatic,
perhaps. Perhaps he could fly home and stay with friends or relatives for
that one week?
If he's taken to an airport by his parents, given into the safe hands of one
of the airline staff and put onto a direct flight to his home city where
he's met by those he's staying with, perhaps all parties could be satisfied.
They weren't doing lengthy transatlantic trips but all my children started
flying from Jersey to England from the age of 8 onwards as unaccompanied
minors and this is just what we did. However, I don't know if airlines will
permit this any more?
--

Sacha
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:06 am
  #48  
Tim Challenger
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

    >>... Indeed, it looks that way to me, even though I'm not a teenager.
    >
    > The photos don't do it justice.

You meant it really *is* a junkyard?
--
Tim C.
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:07 am
  #49  
Juliana L Holm
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

Sacha <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I think there's some misunderstanding here and if so it's probably because I
    > wasn't clear enough. I'm not suggesting just leaving a child and going off
    > for the whole day so that he is alone. I didn't really think it necessary to
    > say that - sorry!
    > What I was thinking of was that for the shorter tours they do, his parents
    > could - perhaps - leave him in a café where he could read, play with his
    > Gameboy or whatever they have now - and then join him there again. For
    > example, I seem to remember that at St Peter ad Vincula, there is a little
    > café where he could sit and wait for what is quite a short tour.
    > He would not be crossing busy roads alone, he would not be wandering the
    > city alone and he can at 14, easily learn to ask for a drink or an icecream
    > or a plate of pasta!

Sitting on the Spanish Steps might be another interesting place to hang out and
people-watch.


--
Julie
**********
Check out my Travel Pages (non-commercial) at
http://www.dragonsholm.org/travel.htm
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:08 am
  #50  
Juliana L Holm
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

Q <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I will be travelling to Rome in January with a 14 year old son. He hates
    > museums, art galleries and the like. Can anyone suggest ideas of what might
    > appeal to him when we get there so we both have a reasonable time?

One suggestion also is St. Ignatio church. The ceiling is a marvel of Trompe
l'Oiel work, has a fake dome and looks like it goes up many yards further than
it really does. The optical illusion is really great, and it is interesting.


--
Julie
**********
Check out my Travel Pages (non-commercial) at
http://www.dragonsholm.org/travel.htm
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:39 am
  #51  
nitram
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 21:36:12 +1000, "Q" <[email protected]> wrote:


    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected].. .
    >> On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 04:31:52 +0200, Mxsmanic <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >> >Nitram writes:
    >> >
    >> >> eighteen year old girls might interest him more.
    >> >
    >> >True, but I was simply giving the most obvious answer first.
    >> and probably the best suggestion so far :-)
    >Good thinking 99. You have met my son?

I start to think I fathered him :-)
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:42 am
  #52  
B Vaughan
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 08:55:40 +0100, Sacha
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >But I must say that in your shoes, I would also point out to him *very*
    >firmly though in the nicest way, that he's had 3 weeks of doing things he
    >*does* enjoy and that he's not going to be allowed to spoil this for you.

Amen, or as my friend said to his son, "I'm not going to put up with
your being aggressively bored." As I said in my other post, I think
you should give him a well-illustrated guide book and ask him to plan
one of the days in Rome. Tell him to research the entire day,
including transport, using the guidebook, the library and the
internet. You might want to even let him plan a day out of town with a
limit of distance and expense.


-----------
Barbara Vaughan
My email address is my first initial followed by my surname at libero dot it
I answer travel questions only in the newsgroup
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:42 am
  #53  
B Vaughan
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 04:35:04 +0200, Mxsmanic <[email protected]>
wrote:

    >Poetic Justice writes:
    >> I think a 14yr old boy would love Ostia Antica. It's a Pompeii-like
    >> ghost town that was once the seaport of Rome.
    >After taking a look at some photos of the place, I know what he would
    >probably say: "But there's almost nothing left of it!" It's a bit of a
    >disappointment to see only a few fragments of walls where you expect a
    >city. Archaeologists might think it a gold mine, but for average
    >teenagers it would look a lot more like a junkyard. Indeed, it looks
    >that way to me, even though I'm not a teenager.

A good many of the buildings are remarkably intact. Some streets are
lined on both sides with multi-story buildings. The bar, with the
mosaic menu has all its walls and is roofed. The ampitheatre is pretty
much intact and is used for performances in the summer. The public
toilet is missing its roof and some of its walls, but the marble seats
are intact. I once climbed to the second floor of what was an ancient
Roman apartment building and looked out the window at a neighboring
apartment building across the street.

-----------
Barbara Vaughan
My email address is my first initial followed by my surname at libero dot it
I answer travel questions only in the newsgroup
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:44 am
  #54  
Juliana L Holm
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

Q <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I will be travelling to Rome in January with a 14 year old son. He hates
    > museums, art galleries and the like. Can anyone suggest ideas of what might
    > appeal to him when we get there so we both have a reasonable time?

Is your son a reader? If so, you might consider getting him Dan Brown's
"Angels and Demons". It's a murder mystery that occurs in Rome. You might
find yourself heading from obelisk to obelisk and from church to church
looking for Bernini statues.

He will particularly want to see St. Therese in ecstasy.

Julie


--
Julie
**********
Check out my Travel Pages (non-commercial) at
http://www.dragonsholm.org/travel.htm
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:44 am
  #55  
Luca Logi
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

Nitram <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >Fourteen-year-old Italian girls.
    >
    > eighteen year old girls might interest him more

In Italy we say "guardare e non toccare" (watch, don't touch)

--
Luca Logi - Firenze - Italy e-mail: [email protected]
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:44 am
  #56  
nitram
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 12:07:09 +0000 (UTC), Juliana L Holm
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >Sitting on the Spanish Steps might be another interesting place to hang out and
    >people-watch.

or the McD's next door ;-)
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 12:45 am
  #57  
nitram
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 14:06:42 +0200, Tim Challenger
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >>>... Indeed, it looks that way to me, even though I'm not a teenager.
    >>
    >> The photos don't do it justice.
    >You meant it really *is* a junkyard?

In a Roman sort of way :-)
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 1:07 am
  #58  
nitram
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 12:44:21 +0000 (UTC), Juliana L Holm
<[email protected]> wrote:


    >He will particularly want to see St. Therese in ecstasy.

I hate to ask but ... wouldn't he be better with a 14 year old girl
    :-)
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 1:48 am
  #59  
Emilia
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

Karen Selwyn <[email protected]> wrote in
news:8b44d.940$0j.322@lakeread08:

    > Q wrote:
    >> I will be travelling to Rome in January with a 14 year old son. He
    >> hates museums, art galleries and the like. Can anyone suggest ideas
    >> of what might appeal to him when we get there so we both have a
    >> reasonable time?
    >
    >
    > Climb and take views! You can climb to the top of the dome at St.
    > Peter's and Castello Sant'Angelo. There's another perch overlooking
    > Piazza del Popolo, but I can't remember the name.
    >
    > A hunt for all the _______________________ in Rome. (e.g. obelisks)
    >
    > Stand in the courtyard of the Vatican on the oval disks on either side
    > of the obelisk and look at the way the columns line up in the
    > colonnade.
    >
    > Arrange for a tour of the necropolis under the Vatican.
    >
    > Contact Scala Reale, an excellent walking tour company, and tell them
    > you have a recalcitrant 14-year old. The could probably construct a
    > fabulous tour that would appeal to your son in spite of his best
    > intentions. (They have a web site)


That just reminded me, you could take a tour of the city on vespa or in a
fiat 500! I've never done this (but want to! ;o) and I have NAYY but I
found this when I was researching Rome for our trip in November. (When
easy jet starts flying GVA to rome! ;o)

http://www.nerone.cc/romemtm/nuovosito/vespa_tours.htm

Oh, I just saw you are going in January. Could be a bit cold for the
Vespas, but the 500's could be OK.

Have fun.

Emilia
 
Old Sep 22nd 2004, 1:59 am
  #60  
Emilia
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Default Re: Teenagers in Rome

"Q" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Thank you for these responses. I should have added that he equates old
    > things with museums. He says one old building/ruin is one too many.
    > History as such is a no go area.

Maybe you should try the '50s and '60s cinema & pop culture aspect of the
city? As I suggested in an earlier message you could do a tour in a fiat
500.

http://www.nerone.cc/romemtm/nuovosito/vespa_tours.htm
I see they even have an Angels & Demons tour from teh book by Dan Brown.
 

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