Go Back  British Expats > Usenet Groups > rec.travel.* > rec.travel.europe
Reload this Page >

Planning trip to Paris/London

Planning trip to Paris/London

Old Feb 5th 2007, 6:46 pm
  #16  
David Horne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

Iceman <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Feb 4, 5:17 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> > I have never been to Europe so I don't even no where to start. I can
> > travel any time during the year. We are starting in Cleveland since it
> > is my first time I would like to know if it is better to do it on my
> > own or go with a tour. any help would be appriciated. What is the best
> > time of the year to go. I will accept e-mails.
>
> There's really no reason to get a tour - they will be more expensive
> than going around on your own, and then you have to follow the tour's
> schedule instead of following your own interests. It's very easy to
> get around on your own in those cities using the subway.

As I mentioned in another post, it's also worth realising that many
sights can be easily negotiated by walking, particularly when planning.
From this point of view, I think a little prior research by the poster
might be a good idea. Also, when the OP has more of an idea of the
various sights they might visit, plenty of us could suggest potential
routes for walking in either city. I really do think it's the best way
to see either place. In London, just getting on a double decker bus
would be fun too, and not just the tourist sightseeing ones.

--
(*) ... of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
David Horne- http://www.davidhorne.net
(don't email yahoo address) usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
 
Old Feb 5th 2007, 7:49 pm
  #17  
The Reid
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 12:50:34 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>and most meals were pre-arranged

which is an excellent reason not to do it IMHO. It depends what the OP
wants to go away with. To state it in extremes, does he want to have
seen all the objects the locals never go to, so he can discuss them
with other tourists back home, or rub shoulders with the locals in
thier places of entertainment and get some idea how these places
differ from home?
--
Mike Reid
UK walking, food, photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Spain walking, food, tourism "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk"
Beginners UK flight sim addons "http://www.lawn-mower-man.co.uk"
 
Old Feb 5th 2007, 7:49 pm
  #18  
The Reid
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

On Mon, 5 Feb 2007 17:32:55 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne,
_the_ chancellor (*)) wrote:

>A few days is enough to get
>> some sort of flavour of the city, and to appreciate the heterogeneity
>> of cities in general.
>
>I agree. My first visits to both cities was around 3 days each, and it's
>enough time to get a flavour without seeming too rushed.

I think this NG sees so many rushed US itineraries that it over
reacts, unless you are a real culture vulture, three days in a city
will give you an idea what its like, see a couple of "sights" and more
importantly go to bars and restros and walk about the place. A week is
too long in a place it turns out you dont like much.
--
Mike Reid
UK walking, food, photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Spain walking, food, tourism "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk"
Beginners UK flight sim addons "http://www.lawn-mower-man.co.uk"
 
Old Feb 5th 2007, 8:00 pm
  #19  
The Reid
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

On Tue, 6 Feb 2007 07:46:23 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne,
_the_ chancellor (*)) wrote:

> In London, just getting on a double decker bus
>would be fun too, and not just the tourist sightseeing ones.

No doubt its fun as a novelty. I recommend walking along the river
front, for anybody reasonably fit I would go all the way to Greenwich
on the north bank and go under the foot tunnel, then use PT to get
back.
--
Mike Reid
London & London walks inc. Thames path
"http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/london.htm"
(see website for email address)
 
Old Feb 5th 2007, 9:43 pm
  #20  
Deeply Filled Mortician
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

Let is be knownst that on Tue, 06 Feb 2007 08:49:14 +0000, The Reid
<[email protected]> writted:

>On Mon, 5 Feb 2007 17:32:55 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne,
>_the_ chancellor (*)) wrote:
>
>>A few days is enough to get
>>> some sort of flavour of the city, and to appreciate the heterogeneity
>>> of cities in general.
>>
>>I agree. My first visits to both cities was around 3 days each, and it's
>>enough time to get a flavour without seeming too rushed.
>
>I think this NG sees so many rushed US itineraries that it over
>reacts, unless you are a real culture vulture, three days in a city
>will give you an idea what its like, see a couple of "sights" and more
>importantly go to bars and restros and walk about the place. A week is
>too long in a place it turns out you dont like much.

That's kinda how I felt about Moscow. Wish I'd spent more time in St
Petersburg or the Baltic states instead.
--
---
DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
---
--
 
Old Feb 5th 2007, 11:33 pm
  #21  
Alan S
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

On Tue, 06 Feb 2007 08:49:14 +0000, The Reid
<[email protected]> wrote:

>On Mon, 5 Feb 2007 17:32:55 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne,
>_the_ chancellor (*)) wrote:
>
>>A few days is enough to get
>>> some sort of flavour of the city, and to appreciate the heterogeneity
>>> of cities in general.
>>
>>I agree. My first visits to both cities was around 3 days each, and it's
>>enough time to get a flavour without seeming too rushed.
>
>I think this NG sees so many rushed US itineraries that it over
>reacts, unless you are a real culture vulture, three days in a city
>will give you an idea what its like, see a couple of "sights" and more
>importantly go to bars and restros and walk about the place. A week is
>too long in a place it turns out you dont like much.

Agreed. Sure, it would be nice to stay a month in some
places but those of us with limited time, and sometimes
limited ability to return, can enjoy a lot in a short time
without getting into "it's Tuesday, this must be Belgium"
mode.

And some of us, especially me, just enjoy travelling that
way; I don't think I spent more than a week anywhere in
Europe, mostly 3-4-5 days in each major city and similar
periods in some of the regions. To each their own.

And Slovenia was so incredibly exciting I stayed one night
in Domzale, although it would have been two if there had
been a hotel anywhere near the Hungarian border.

Cheers, Alan, Australia
--
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com/
latest: Epidaurus
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/
 
Old Feb 5th 2007, 11:58 pm
  #22  
David Horne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

The Reid <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Mon, 5 Feb 2007 17:32:55 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne,
> _the_ chancellor (*)) wrote:
>
> >A few days is enough to get
> >> some sort of flavour of the city, and to appreciate the heterogeneity
> >> of cities in general.
> >
> >I agree. My first visits to both cities was around 3 days each, and it's
> >enough time to get a flavour without seeming too rushed.
>
> I think this NG sees so many rushed US itineraries that it over
> reacts, unless you are a real culture vulture, three days in a city
> will give you an idea what its like, see a couple of "sights" and more
> importantly go to bars and restros and walk about the place. A week is
> too long in a place it turns out you dont like much.

And further, I think I'd need to escape from the city if I was there
that long. I don't think I ever have been in a city that long, come to
think about it.

--
(*) ... of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
David Horne- http://www.davidhorne.net
(don't email yahoo address) usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
 
Old Feb 5th 2007, 11:58 pm
  #23  
David Horne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

The Reid <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Tue, 6 Feb 2007 07:46:23 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne,
> _the_ chancellor (*)) wrote:
>
> > In London, just getting on a double decker bus
> >would be fun too, and not just the tourist sightseeing ones.
>
> No doubt its fun as a novelty.

Not really that. I think it's also fun as a way to see the city from a
different angle- i.e. from the top deck.

--
(*) ... of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
David Horne- http://www.davidhorne.net
(don't email yahoo address) usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
 
Old Feb 6th 2007, 12:27 am
  #24  
The Reid
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

On Tue, 6 Feb 2007 12:58:18 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne,
_the_ chancellor (*)) wrote:

> I think I'd need to escape from the city if I was there
>that long. I don't think I ever have been in a city that long, come to
>think about it.

me neither, London apart!
--
Mike Reid
UK walking, food, photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Spain walking, food, tourism "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk"
Beginners UK flight sim addons "http://www.lawn-mower-man.co.uk"
 
Old Feb 6th 2007, 12:40 am
  #25  
Erick T . Barkhuis
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

[Staying in a city for 4 or more days]

The Reid:
> David Horne:
>
> > I think I'd need to escape from the city if I was there
> >that long. I don't think I ever have been in a city that long, come to
> >think about it.
>
> me neither, London apart!

Well, I have and will.
In large cities (Paris, London, Berlin) I find that I will only localize
the interesting places away from the very heart of town after the second
day. And I love to stay there for a while to taste the typical local city
atmosphere, away from the typical tourist areas.

Of course, the cities mentioned above have several "hearts of town", city
districts if you will, with their own 'city district center'. In somewhat
smaller cities, like Amsterdam, Barcelona and Cologne, I find it a thrill
to stroll in the streets and visit local bars/restaurants/pubs and
especially markets or join groups of youngsters in a game of basketball
or soccer at local playgrounds and pick up their stories during breaks.
[And I need those breaks :-)]

For me, four days is a minimum to find and explore those places. Six
would be great.

On the other hand, if you're just interested in the main tourist
attractions, the central market square, the local cathedral and a couple
of museums, then 3-4 days will do nicely. Wouldn't be my ideal city trip,
though.

--
Erick
 
Old Feb 6th 2007, 3:28 am
  #26  
David Horne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

Erick T. Barkhuis <[email protected]> wrote:

[]
> On the other hand, if you're just interested in the main tourist
> attractions, the central market square, the local cathedral and a couple
> of museums, then 3-4 days will do nicely.

You mean cities have more to offer than just that? My god, I must look
more closely next time.

--
(*) ... of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
David Horne- http://www.davidhorne.net
(don't email yahoo address) usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
 
Old Feb 6th 2007, 3:31 am
  #27  
-Martin
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

On Tue, 6 Feb 2007 16:28:25 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne, _the_
chancellor (*)) wrote:

>Erick T. Barkhuis <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>[]
>> On the other hand, if you're just interested in the main tourist
>> attractions, the central market square, the local cathedral and a couple
>> of museums, then 3-4 days will do nicely.
>
>You mean cities have more to offer than just that? My god, I must look
>more closely next time.

Munich definitely has much more than that.
--

Martin
 
Old Feb 6th 2007, 3:35 am
  #28  
David Horne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

Martin <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Tue, 6 Feb 2007 16:28:25 +0000, [email protected] (David Horne, _the_
> chancellor (*)) wrote:
>
> >Erick T. Barkhuis <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >[]
> >> On the other hand, if you're just interested in the main tourist
> >> attractions, the central market square, the local cathedral and a couple
> >> of museums, then 3-4 days will do nicely.
> >
> >You mean cities have more to offer than just that? My god, I must look
> >more closely next time.
>
> Munich definitely has much more than that.

I was being sarcastic. I don't think that people who only visit cities
for 3-4 days are always only interested in those things. Besides, I
usually think of cities as places I will return to at some point.

--
(*) ... of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
David Horne- http://www.davidhorne.net
(don't email yahoo address) usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
 
Old Feb 6th 2007, 3:35 am
  #29  
-Iceman
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

On Feb 6, 2:46 am, [email protected] (David Horne, _the_ chancellor
(*)) wrote:
> Iceman <[email protected]> wrote:
> > On Feb 4, 5:17 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> > > I have never been to Europe so I don't even no where to start. I can
> > > travel any time during the year. We are starting in Cleveland since it
> > > is my first time I would like to know if it is better to do it on my
> > > own or go with a tour. any help would be appriciated. What is the best
> > > time of the year to go. I will accept e-mails.
>
> > There's really no reason to get a tour - they will be more expensive
> > than going around on your own, and then you have to follow the tour's
> > schedule instead of following your own interests. It's very easy to
> > get around on your own in those cities using the subway.
>
> As I mentioned in another post, it's also worth realising that many
> sights can be easily negotiated by walking, particularly when planning.
> From this point of view, I think a little prior research by the poster
> might be a good idea. Also, when the OP has more of an idea of the
> various sights they might visit, plenty of us could suggest potential
> routes for walking in either city. I really do think it's the best way
> to see either place. In London, just getting on a double decker bus
> would be fun too, and not just the tourist sightseeing ones.

I also really enjoy walking around cities like London or Paris, and
think walking a lot through back streets is a good way to see more of
a city than just its tourist sights.

However, while I think walking is a good idea to visit sights or
neighborhoods that are close together, there are many places of
interest in both cities that are not just a short walk from the
center, and the subway will get you to them quickly.
 
Old Feb 6th 2007, 3:40 am
  #30  
David Horne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Planning trip to Paris/London

Iceman <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Feb 6, 2:46 am, [email protected] (David Horne, _the_ chancellor
> (*)) wrote:
[]
> > As I mentioned in another post, it's also worth realising that many
> > sights can be easily negotiated by walking, particularly when planning.
> > From this point of view, I think a little prior research by the poster
> > might be a good idea. Also, when the OP has more of an idea of the
> > various sights they might visit, plenty of us could suggest potential
> > routes for walking in either city. I really do think it's the best way
> > to see either place. In London, just getting on a double decker bus
> > would be fun too, and not just the tourist sightseeing ones.
>
> I also really enjoy walking around cities like London or Paris, and
> think walking a lot through back streets is a good way to see more of
> a city than just its tourist sights.
>
> However, while I think walking is a good idea to visit sights or
> neighborhoods that are close together, there are many places of
> interest in both cities that are not just a short walk from the
> center, and the subway will get you to them quickly.

I agree, which is why a bit of research is a good idea in cities of
those sizes.

--
(*) ... of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
David Horne- http://www.davidhorne.net
(don't email yahoo address) usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
 

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.