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Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

Old Oct 17th 2004, 7:17 am
  #31  
Gg
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Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

"Ellie C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > Susan Wachob wrote:
    > >
    > > Rue Cler is a small market street and has a few delivery trucks in the
    > > early morning and at the end of the day, street cleaning water trucks
    > > come to wash the street but otherwise is closed to traffic- or at least
    > > it used to be. There are lots of little stands- fruit, fish, etc. There
    > > are also a number of little cafes and places to sit outside.
    > > Surprisingly- there is NO SMELL from the stands. It's pristine.
    > >
    > > My favorite Paris hotel (Hotel Grand Leveque) is there and each morning,
    > > we'd sit outside of a cafe and have coffee and whatever. It's a lovely
    > > place to just sit and watch a little slice of real Paris. It seemed to
    > > be where the "help" from the rather fancy neighborhood come to buy high
    > > quality fresh food.
    > >
    > > I'm not sure it would be a destination to just go and sit or dine.
    > > They're not restaurants- but we always try to stay there. You might want
    > > to check it out!
    > >
    > > Enjoy your trip-
    > >
    > > Susan
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Ellie C wrote:
    > >
    > >> Ronald Hands wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Ellie C wrote:
    > >>> We're planning on going to paris in a few weeks and I'm
    > >>>
    > >>>> wondering if there are car free shopping/restaurant areas in Paris.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> One of Rick Steves' favorite haunts is Rue Cler, in the 7th near
    > >>> the Eiffel Tower (if I have my geography right) and I believe he
    > >>> mentions it is pedestrian-only.
    > >>>
    > >>> -- Ron
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> I just gave it a look in the Pages Jaunes's "Photos de Villes"
    > >> section. It looks like the pedestrian part starts at #23/24 and goes
    > >> to the end of the street, maybe a few blocks. I did see about a dozen
    > >> or so cars parked there but it looks like there's not constant
    > >> traffic. It looks like it's mainly a market though. I didn't see a
    > >> restaurant or café. A good place to start though. Thanks!
    > Sounds like just the sort of hotel we'll be looking for. Interestingly,
    > it's just around the corner from where I stayed the first time I was inj
    > Paris, in 1992. The hotel was the Hotel France but I don't think it
    > exists anymore. I like that area, though. Thanks!

I've also stayed at the Grand Hôtel Lévêque and liked it.
http://www.hotel-leveque.com .
Another hotel in that neighborhood that looks very nice is the Hôtel du
Champ de Mars. It's just around the corner from rue Cler and is possibly
somewhat quieter. http://www.hotel-du-champ-de-mars.com/ .

GG
 
Old Oct 17th 2004, 7:25 am
  #32  
nitram
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Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 15:17:33 -0400, "GG" <[email protected]>
wrote:

    >Another hotel in that neighborhood that looks very nice is the Hôtel du
    >Champ de Mars. It's just around the corner from rue Cler and is possibly
    >somewhat quieter. http://www.hotel-du-champ-de-mars.com/ .

When I stayed there in the nineteen sixties, the only window in one
room opened onto a ventilation shaft. Otherwise it was o.k.
 
Old Oct 17th 2004, 10:17 am
  #33  
Bjorn Olsson
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Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

Deep Frayed Morgues <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>. ..
    > On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 14:25:13 +0200, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > >On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:56:19 +0100, Padraig Breathnach
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>Ellie C <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>Mxsmanic wrote:
    >
    > >>>> The pedestrian areas, such as they are, are nevertheless quite nice.
    > >>>> And even many areas that allow cars are still very charming.
    > >>>>
    > >>>Although charm is nice, I'm looking more for absence of exhaust fumes.
    > >>
    > >>In Paris? Not much chance of that.
    > >
    > >Rotterdam is apparently the most polluted place in the world.
    >
    > Nah, I can't possibly believe that. Ever been to China? I read in
    > Colours magazine that it has 9 of the 10 most polluted cities in the
    > world

Which does leave exactly one slot in the top ten list for Rotterdam..

But I don't beleive it either.

Bjorn
 
Old Oct 17th 2004, 10:22 am
  #34  
nitram
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Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

On 17 Oct 2004 15:17:58 -0700, [email protected] (Bjorn Olsson) wrote:

    >Deep Frayed Morgues <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>. ..
    >> On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 14:25:13 +0200, [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >> >On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:56:19 +0100, Padraig Breathnach
    >> ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>Ellie C <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>>Mxsmanic wrote:
    >>
    >> >>>> The pedestrian areas, such as they are, are nevertheless quite nice.
    >> >>>> And even many areas that allow cars are still very charming.
    >> >>>>
    >> >>>Although charm is nice, I'm looking more for absence of exhaust fumes.
    >> >>
    >> >>In Paris? Not much chance of that.
    >> >
    >> >Rotterdam is apparently the most polluted place in the world.
    >>
    >> Nah, I can't possibly believe that. Ever been to China? I read in
    >> Colours magazine that it has 9 of the 10 most polluted cities in the
    >> world
    >Which does leave exactly one slot in the top ten list for Rotterdam..
    >But I don't beleive it either.

There are plenty of newspaper reports confirming it. At least one has
been posted here.
 
Old Oct 17th 2004, 10:24 am
  #35  
Bjorn Olsson
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Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

[email protected] (Miguel Cruz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Deep Frayed Morgues <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Nah, I can't possibly believe that. Ever been to China? I read in
    > > Colours magazine that it has 9 of the 10 most polluted cities in the
    > > world, a statement I find easy to fathom.
    >
    > I was just annoying all of you from China a week ago. In Beijing the
    > pollution was so bad that by mid-afternoon that I could not see buildings
    > three streets away. At all. It made navigating the city an extra challenge,
    > since I couldn't read the signs either (language, not pollution).
    >
    > I've really never seen anything like it. Even in indoor spaces, if large
    > enough, the air was visibly thick and murky (except for air-conditioned
    > buildings like shopping malls).
    >
    > Have a look at this photo:
    >
    > http://travel.u.nu/photo-cn-12.php
    >
    > The closest part of the building is pretty much across the street from where
    > I was standing, and it's already noticeably obscured by the haze. The
    > pointy one in the background is at the end of the block. Behind that one
    > (across another street) there are other tall buildings, and you can't see
    > them at all, except for a slight hint at the very left edge of the frame
    > near the horizon line.
    >
    > miguel

non-smoking restaurants in China:

http://www.smokefreeworld.com/asia-pac.shtml#prc

Bjorn :)
 
Old Oct 17th 2004, 10:28 am
  #36  
nitram
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

On 17 Oct 2004 15:17:58 -0700, [email protected] (Bjorn Olsson) wrote:

    >Deep Frayed Morgues <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>. ..
    >> On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 14:25:13 +0200, [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >> >On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:56:19 +0100, Padraig Breathnach
    >> ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>Ellie C <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>>Mxsmanic wrote:
    >>
    >> >>>> The pedestrian areas, such as they are, are nevertheless quite nice.
    >> >>>> And even many areas that allow cars are still very charming.
    >> >>>>
    >> >>>Although charm is nice, I'm looking more for absence of exhaust fumes.
    >> >>
    >> >>In Paris? Not much chance of that.
    >> >
    >> >Rotterdam is apparently the most polluted place in the world.
    >>
    >> Nah, I can't possibly believe that. Ever been to China? I read in
    >> Colours magazine that it has 9 of the 10 most polluted cities in the
    >> world
    >Which does leave exactly one slot in the top ten list for Rotterdam..
    >But I don't beleive it either.

http://www.expatica.com/source/site_...+NO2+pollution
"Randstad has world's worst NO2 pollution


15 October 2004

AMSTERDAM � The Netherlands has the world's worst nitrogen dioxide air
pollution and the cloud extends to Belgium and Germany, new satellite
photos have revealed.

The Randstad is covered in a cloud of NO2. © University of Heidelberg
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine pollution particles are thought to be
responsible for about 5,000 premature deaths in the Netherlands and
200,000 across Europe.

Despite the NO2 concentration failing to breach European regulations,
Environment State Secretary Pieter van Geel said the situation is
"exceptionally serious".

The satellite photos from the Envisat � which was launched two years
ago � show that Flanders in Belgium and the Ruhr industrial region in
Germany also have large concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, news
agency ANP reported.

The Chinese east coast, various regions in Japan, the northeast of the
US, the Po region in Italy and other densely population regions are
encountering severe nitrogen dioxide pollution. Air pollution is
frequently detected above major cities.

The picture shows much of the Netherlands � particularly the Randstad
region bordered by Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht �
covered by a deep red colour indicating the large concentration of
nitrogen dioxide, which is hazardous for public health.

The concentration of the air pollution is due in part to the high
population density of the Netherlands, industry in neighbouring
countries and vehicle traffic, newspaper De Telegraaf reported.

The European Space Agency (ESA) said nitrogen oxides are produced by
emissions from power plants, heavy industry and road transport, along
with biomass burning. Lightning in the air also creates nitrogen
oxides naturally, as does microbial activity in the soil.

Long-term exposure to small amounts of nitrogen dioxide or short-term
exposure to high concentrations leads generally to lung damage and
respiratory problems. People with poor health suffer more asthma
attacks and could suffer premature deaths.

Both Labour PvdA and the Christian Democrat CDA hope that the
satellite photo will stimulate greater urgency to combat air
pollution. CDA MP Liesbeth Spies said air pollution is a difficult
subject and despite the fact there are often calls to amend policy,
very little actually changes.

PvdA MP Diederik Samsom said the satellite image told more than a
thousand words: "It is clear that something really must be done". He
called for a multilateral strategy.

Van Geel is also in favour of a multilateral approach and will
introduce a subsidy next year on exhaust filters for diesel cars. He
is also calling on the shipping industry to reduce the emission of
deadly gases. To reduce the use of diesel, excise duties on the use of
the fuel will be raised.

European environment ministers � who met in Luxembourg on Thursday �
are also keen to accelerate moves to make cars cleaner and more
efficient. The European Commission is also implementing more stringent
standards on traffic regarding carbon dioxide and nitrogen dioxide
emissions.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004 "
 
Old Oct 17th 2004, 11:39 am
  #37  
Tom Bellhouse
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Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

"Bjorn Olsson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected] om...
    > [email protected] (Miguel Cruz) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Deep Frayed Morgues <[email protected]>
wrote:
    > > > Nah, I can't possibly believe that. Ever been to China? I read in
    > > > Colours magazine that it has 9 of the 10 most polluted cities in
the
    > > > world, a statement I find easy to fathom.
    > >
    > > I was just annoying all of you from China a week ago. In Beijing the
    > > pollution was so bad that by mid-afternoon that I could not see
buildings
    > > three streets away. At all. It made navigating the city an extra
challenge,
    > > since I couldn't read the signs either (language, not pollution).
    > >
    > > I've really never seen anything like it. Even in indoor spaces, if
large
    > > enough, the air was visibly thick and murky (except for
air-conditioned
    > > buildings like shopping malls).
    > >
    > > Have a look at this photo:
    > >
    > > http://travel.u.nu/photo-cn-12.php
    > >
    > > The closest part of the building is pretty much across the street
from where
    > > I was standing, and it's already noticeably obscured by the haze.
The
    > > pointy one in the background is at the end of the block. Behind that
one
    > > (across another street) there are other tall buildings, and you
can't see
    > > them at all, except for a slight hint at the very left edge of the
frame
    > > near the horizon line.
    > >
    > > miguel
    > non-smoking restaurants in China:
    > http://www.smokefreeworld.com/asia-pac.shtml#prc
    > Bjorn :)

Talk about straining at gnats and passing camels...
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 2:34 am
  #38  
Deep Frayed Morgues
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Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:39:11 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Bjorn Olsson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. com...

    >> non-smoking restaurants in China:
    >> http://www.smokefreeworld.com/asia-pac.shtml#prc
    >> Bjorn :)
    >Talk about straining at gnats and passing camels...

OK, I have heard some weird expressions in my time, but what the hell
does that one mean, and where does it come from?
---
DFM
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 2:35 am
  #39  
nitram
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 14:34:59 GMT, Deep Frayed Morgues
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:39:11 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>"Bjorn Olsson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] .com...
    >>> non-smoking restaurants in China:
    >>> http://www.smokefreeworld.com/asia-pac.shtml#prc
    >>> Bjorn :)
    >>Talk about straining at gnats and passing camels...
    >OK, I have heard some weird expressions in my time, but what the hell
    >does that one mean, and where does it come from?

biblical innit?
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 3:00 am
  #40  
Tom Bellhouse
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

"Deep Frayed Morgues" <[email protected]>
wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:39:11 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >"Bjorn Olsson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]. com...
    > >> non-smoking restaurants in China:
    > >>
    > >> http://www.smokefreeworld.com/asia-pac.shtml#prc
    > >>
    > >> Bjorn :)
    > >
    > >Talk about straining at gnats and passing camels...
    > OK, I have heard some weird expressions in my time, but what the hell
    > does that one mean, and where does it come from?
    > ---
    > DFM
=======
Sorry, my quote was inexact. Here 'tis again:
"Ye blind guides, which strain at a gnat, and swallow a camel."-Matthew
23:24.

Tom <--- obviously no biblical scholar ;<)
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 6:19 am
  #41  
Meurgues
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Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

Mxsmanic <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>. ..
    > Ellie C writes:
    >
    > > We were in Narbonne yesterday and were thrilled to find a fairly large
    > > area of the city where there are little shops and restaurants and no
    > > cars. What a treat to sit and drink coffee without the addition of
    > > diesel fumes. We're planning on going to paris in a few weeks and I'm
    > > wondering if there are car free shopping/restaurant areas in Paris.
    >
    > There are, although perhaps not as many as some would like to see.
    >
    > There's a large pedestrian area in the Latin Quarter. There are such
    > areas in Montmartre, Bercy, the Forum, and at other locations. They
    > usually cover half a dozen streets or so. You're almost never that far
    > from traffic, though, and Paris is a city with a lot of traffic (one
    > thing you don't hear in movies about Paris is the _constant_ traffic
    > noise--it's edited out in post-production).
    >
    > La Défense is a very large pedestrian's-only area which is rather nice,
    > but it's not actually in Paris, and it's very modern, not really
    > Parisian in the classic style at all.
    >
    > The pedestrian areas, such as they are, are nevertheless quite nice.
    > And even many areas that allow cars are still very charming.

Some info there :
http://www.paris.fr/fr/deplacements/...n_chiffres.asp

Unfortunately the datas of the city of Paris don't make a distinction
between the true pedestrian streets and the "reduced traffic streets"
    : "voies à circulation réduite" (= "quartier tranquilles" ?).
- 382 (42,5 km, 302 800 m2) pedestrian or with reduced trafic streets
on 5 092 and 1700 km (+ 171 streets and 17 km for the 2 woods,
boulevard périphérique and voie express)
- 708 (99 km) closed private streets.

- 3 pedestrian zones :
The main zone of Les Halles - Montorgueil - Beaubourg includes about
50 streets and passages separated in 3 parts by 2 perpendicular
boulevards.
- 46 "quartiers tranquilles" (reduced traffic zones).

Outside the 3 pedestrian zones, the pedestrian streets are generally
isolated but scattered all over Paris. Some "reduced trafic streets"
are virtually pedestrian in fact (ex : rue Daguerre). In some
districts some small normal
streets see few or virtually no traffic most of the day (ex : North
Marais) because the boulevards are mainly used for heavy transit
traffic.

didier Meurgues
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 8:28 am
  #42  
Deep Frayed Morgues
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 11:00:45 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Deep Frayed Morgues" <[email protected]>
    >wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:39:11 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >"Bjorn Olsson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >news:[email protected]. com...
    >> >> non-smoking restaurants in China:
    >> >>
    >> >> http://www.smokefreeworld.com/asia-pac.shtml#prc
    >> >>
    >> >> Bjorn :)
    >> >
    >> >Talk about straining at gnats and passing camels...
    >> OK, I have heard some weird expressions in my time, but what the hell
    >> does that one mean, and where does it come from?
    >> ---
    >> DFM
    >=======
    >Sorry, my quote was inexact. Here 'tis again:
    >"Ye blind guides, which strain at a gnat, and swallow a camel."-Matthew
    >23:24.

OK, it's a biblical one, but what on earth does it mean??? I might
need to use it one day.
---
DFM
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 8:36 am
  #43  
Anonymous
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

    > Outside the 3 pedestrian zones, the pedestrian streets are generally
    > isolated but scattered all over Paris. Some "reduced trafic streets"
    > are virtually pedestrian in fact (ex : rue Daguerre). In some
    > districts some small normal
    > streets see few or virtually no traffic most of the day (ex : North
    > Marais) because the boulevards are mainly used for heavy transit
    > traffic.

Hi,

I'm very familiar with the rue daguerre (mo:denfert-rochereau) since I
have family in the neighborhood...

it's mainly a market street but it's NOT a pedestrian only street... in
fact at night it's got heavy truck traffic doing deliveries and if
street noise bothers you and you're in one of the little hotels on it
you should avoid rooms streetside.

but it is a neighborhood I like.... I feel at home there :-}

ttyl

akia

--

Sideplates for Lienad / Cobray Derringer Parts Kit
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=7107419346
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 8:51 am
  #44  
Bill Moore
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

In article <[email protected]>,
Deep Frayed Morgues <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 11:00:45 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>"Deep Frayed Morgues" <[email protected]>
    >>wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>> On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:39:11 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> >"Bjorn Olsson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> >news:[email protected]. com...
    >>> >> non-smoking restaurants in China:
    >>> >>
    >>> >> http://www.smokefreeworld.com/asia-pac.shtml#prc
    >>> >>
    >>> >> Bjorn :)
    >>> >
    >>> >Talk about straining at gnats and passing camels...
    >>> OK, I have heard some weird expressions in my time, but what the hell
    >>> does that one mean, and where does it come from?
    >>> ---
    >>> DFM
    >>=======
    >>Sorry, my quote was inexact. Here 'tis again:
    >>"Ye blind guides, which strain at a gnat, and swallow a camel."-Matthew
    >>23:24.
    >OK, it's a biblical one, but what on earth does it mean??? I might
    >need to use it one day.

"Strain at a gnat" - giving undue attention to something minor
"Swallow a camel" - ignoring something major
 
Old Oct 18th 2004, 2:10 pm
  #45  
Frank F. Matthews
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Pedestrian Streets in Paris?

Deep Frayed Morgues wrote:

    > On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 11:00:45 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>"Deep Frayed Morgues" <[email protected]>
    >>wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>>On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:39:11 -0400, "Tom Bellhouse"
    >>><[email protected]> wrote:

    >>>>"Bjorn Olsson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>news:[email protected] le.com...
    >>>>>non-smoking restaurants in China:

    >>>>>http://www.smokefreeworld.com/asia-pac.shtml#prc
    >>>>>Bjorn :)
    >>>>Talk about straining at gnats and passing camels...
    >>>OK, I have heard some weird expressions in my time, but what the hell
    >>>does that one mean, and where does it come from?
    >>>---
    >>>DFM

    >>Sorry, my quote was inexact. Here 'tis again:
    >>"Ye blind guides, which strain at a gnat, and swallow a camel."-Matthew
    >>23:24.

    > OK, it's a biblical one, but what on earth does it mean??? I might
    > need to use it one day.
    > DFM

OK I'll try a translation. "Your approach is so weird. You are bugged
by little things but the big stuff blows right by."
 

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