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Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Old Jan 9th 2007, 5:54 am
  #46  
Deeply Filled Mortician
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Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Let is be knownst that on 09 Jan 2007 18:12:06 GMT, Jesper Lauridsen
<[email protected]> writted:

>On 2007-01-02, Wolfgang Schwanke <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> For the German and Italian speakers, French is just a foreign language
>> they learn at school. The same is true for Italian respectively. I
>> think all Swiss are supposed to learn each other's languages, but they
>> don't necessarily mean they speak them well enough. At least that's
>> what Swiss people tell.
>
>I've had the experience of trying to communicate with Swiss people who
>spoke neither German, Italian or English.

Recently I had the experience of doing a job interview only in
Italian, and I must say it was hard. He really put me on the spot by
asking "So, tell me what you are about" (in Italian of course).
--
---
DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
---
--
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 6:54 am
  #47  
EvelynVogtGamble
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Deeply Filled Mortician wrote:

> Let is be knownst that on 09 Jan 2007 18:12:06 GMT, Jesper Lauridsen
> <[email protected]> writted:
>
>
>>On 2007-01-02, Wolfgang Schwanke <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>>For the German and Italian speakers, French is just a foreign language
>>>they learn at school. The same is true for Italian respectively. I
>>>think all Swiss are supposed to learn each other's languages, but they
>>>don't necessarily mean they speak them well enough. At least that's
>>>what Swiss people tell.
>>
>>I've had the experience of trying to communicate with Swiss people who
>>spoke neither German, Italian or English.
>
>
> Recently I had the experience of doing a job interview only in
> Italian, and I must say it was hard. He really put me on the spot by
> asking "So, tell me what you are about" (in Italian of course).

I always had enough trouble with such asinine questions when
posed in English! (Generally at about that point I'd use a
polite equivalent of "If my qualifications aren't enough
indication of whether or not I can do the job, you can shove
it!" and walk out - who needs to work for amateur
psychologists who couldn't "interpret" an honest answer if
you gave them one?)
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 7:47 am
  #48  
Keith Anderson
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

On Tue, 09 Jan 2007 12:54:18 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
<[email protected]> wrote:


>I always had enough trouble with such asinine questions when
>posed in English! (Generally at about that point I'd use a
>polite equivalent of "If my qualifications aren't enough
>indication of whether or not I can do the job, you can shove
>it!" and walk out - who needs to work for amateur
>psychologists who couldn't "interpret" an honest answer if
>you gave them one?)

Hehehehe!

Once had an interview with a panel of 3 people who were giving me a
real grilling - including the Director of Human Resources (Human
Remains) of a local authority. A really hostile interview, it was.

Human Remains Director: What do you bring to teamwork?

Me: Depends on the constitution and purpose of the team and my
position on the team.

Human Remains Director: (silence)

Me: OK, as a tour-manager, I have to work in teams with all sorts of
people - coach drivers, excursion suppliers, captains and pursers of
river-cruise ships........and I have no problem at all in working with
all sorts of different people to make things work. Part of the job is
forming instant teams and I actually love it!

Human Remains Director: Yes, but what do you bring to teamwork?

Me: (realising that I did not want to work with these idiots) Do you
mean teamwork as in working with real people in real situations or
teamwork as it exists in the fertile imagination of a Human Resources
Director?

Human Remains Director: (silence again)

Pretty soon afterwards I walked out of the interview having told them
what I thought of them.


Keith, Bristol, UK
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 7:54 am
  #49  
Erick T . Barkhuis
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Keith Anderson:

> Once had an interview with a panel of 3 people who were giving me a
> real grilling - including the Director of Human Resources (Human
> Remains) of a local authority. A really hostile interview, it was.

But initially, you wanted the job, right?
>
> Human Remains Director: What do you bring to teamwork?

He probably wants to know what type of person you are. A realist, the
joker, the one who gets the team through tough situations, the Idea
Man...

>
> Me: Depends on the constitution and purpose of the team and my
> position on the team.
>
> Human Remains Director: (silence)
>
> Me: OK, as a tour-manager, I have to work in teams with all sorts of
> people - coach drivers, excursion suppliers, captains and pursers of
> river-cruise ships........and I have no problem at all in working with
> all sorts of different people to make things work. Part of the job is
> forming instant teams and I actually love it!

Sounds great.
But still, he doesn't know what type of person YOU are on the team

> Human Remains Director: Yes, but what do you bring to teamwork?

Now, here you could have gone several ways:
- "What aspect are you referring to, Sir?"
- "On such team, I'm usually the one who...."
- "Perhaps I don't exactly understand the question. Could you please
rephrase that?"

>
> Me: (realising that I did not want to work with these idiots)

Idiots?
If you were on the other side of the table, what would you have asked
instead?

> Pretty soon afterwards I walked out of the interview having told them
> what I thought of them.

...without the job.
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 8:54 am
  #50  
Keith Anderson
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

On Tue, 9 Jan 2007 21:54:20 +0100, Erick T. Barkhuis
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Keith Anderson:
>
>> Once had an interview with a panel of 3 people who were giving me a
>> real grilling - including the Director of Human Resources (Human
>> Remains) of a local authority. A really hostile interview, it was.
>
>But initially, you wanted the job, right?

Needed the money!
>>
>> Human Remains Director: What do you bring to teamwork?
>
>He probably wants to know what type of person you are. A realist, the
>joker, the one who gets the team through tough situations, the Idea
>Man...

It's never static. Sometimes I lead, sometimes I follow. Sometimes I'm
funny, sometimes I'm deadly serious.
>
>>
>> Me: Depends on the constitution and purpose of the team and my
>> position on the team.
>>
>> Human Remains Director: (silence)
>>
>> Me: OK, as a tour-manager, I have to work in teams with all sorts of
>> people - coach drivers, excursion suppliers, captains and pursers of
>> river-cruise ships........and I have no problem at all in working with
>> all sorts of different people to make things work. Part of the job is
>> forming instant teams and I actually love it!
>
>Sounds great.
>But still, he doesn't know what type of person YOU are on the team

Still depends on the function of the team and my role in it, the team
dynamic (etc, etc).
>
>> Human Remains Director: Yes, but what do you bring to teamwork?
>
>Now, here you could have gone several ways:
>- "What aspect are you referring to, Sir?"
>- "On such team, I'm usually the one who...."
>- "Perhaps I don't exactly understand the question. Could you please
>rephrase that?"
>
>>
>> Me: (realising that I did not want to work with these idiots)
>
>Idiots?
>If you were on the other side of the table, what would you have asked
>instead?

Well, I certainly wouldn't have sat there, slit-mouthed and hostile,
throughout the whole procedure.
>
>> Pretty soon afterwards I walked out of the interview having told them
>> what I thought of them.
>
>...without the job.

Just as well, in retrospect. Had a similar interview with a related
organisation later on, and got the job in fact, a better one.


Keith, Bristol, UK
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 9:00 am
  #51  
EvelynVogtGamble
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Keith Anderson wrote:

> On Tue, 09 Jan 2007 12:54:18 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
>>I always had enough trouble with such asinine questions when
>>posed in English! (Generally at about that point I'd use a
>>polite equivalent of "If my qualifications aren't enough
>>indication of whether or not I can do the job, you can shove
>>it!" and walk out - who needs to work for amateur
>>psychologists who couldn't "interpret" an honest answer if
>>you gave them one?)
>
>
> Hehehehe!
>
> Once had an interview with a panel of 3 people who were giving me a
> real grilling - including the Director of Human Resources (Human
> Remains) of a local authority. A really hostile interview, it was.
>
> Human Remains Director: What do you bring to teamwork?
>
> Me: Depends on the constitution and purpose of the team and my
> position on the team.
>
> Human Remains Director: (silence)
>
> Me: OK, as a tour-manager, I have to work in teams with all sorts of
> people - coach drivers, excursion suppliers, captains and pursers of
> river-cruise ships........and I have no problem at all in working with
> all sorts of different people to make things work. Part of the job is
> forming instant teams and I actually love it!
>
> Human Remains Director: Yes, but what do you bring to teamwork?
>
> Me: (realising that I did not want to work with these idiots) Do you
> mean teamwork as in working with real people in real situations or
> teamwork as it exists in the fertile imagination of a Human Resources
> Director?
>
> Human Remains Director: (silence again)
>
> Pretty soon afterwards I walked out of the interview having told them
> what I thought of them.

LOL! I think it's a matter of being confident of your own
abilities. I may have had a few self-worth problems in my
personal life, but I always knew I was good at the work I
did, realized what I could and could not do without
assistance, and had the intelligence to ask questions when I
didn't understand something.
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 9:06 am
  #52  
Erick T . Barkhuis
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Keith Anderson:
> Erick wrote:
>
> >Keith Anderson:

> >> Pretty soon afterwards I walked out of the interview having told them
> >> what I thought of them.
> >
> >...without the job.
>
> Just as well, in retrospect. Had a similar interview with a related
> organisation later on, and got the job in fact, a better one.

OK, I'll buy that.
Congrats!

--
Erick

"If you save the world too often, it begins to expect it"
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 9:25 am
  #53  
Keith Anderson
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

On Tue, 9 Jan 2007 23:06:45 +0100, Erick T. Barkhuis
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Keith Anderson:
>> Erick wrote:
>>
>> >Keith Anderson:
>
>> >> Pretty soon afterwards I walked out of the interview having told them
>> >> what I thought of them.
>> >
>> >...without the job.
>>
>> Just as well, in retrospect. Had a similar interview with a related
>> organisation later on, and got the job in fact, a better one.
>
>OK, I'll buy that.
>Congrats!

Cheers! That was a while back, and things have moved on......now
working with a team where everyone helps and supports one another and
a boss who appreciates everyone's effort - and tells us so. Not only
do we respect each other, we like one another which makes things even
more pleasant although the circumstances of the job are often
stressful.

My other job is casual work at a museum - another terrific, friendly
team, lots of fun, and ample opportunity to chat to visitors and
explain things.


Keith, Bristol, UK
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 10:14 am
  #54  
Deeply Filled Mortician
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Let is be knownst that on Tue, 09 Jan 2007 12:54:18 -0700,
"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" <[email protected]> writted:

>
>
>Deeply Filled Mortician wrote:
>
>> Let is be knownst that on 09 Jan 2007 18:12:06 GMT, Jesper Lauridsen
>> <[email protected]> writted:
>>
>>
>>>On 2007-01-02, Wolfgang Schwanke <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>>For the German and Italian speakers, French is just a foreign language
>>>>they learn at school. The same is true for Italian respectively. I
>>>>think all Swiss are supposed to learn each other's languages, but they
>>>>don't necessarily mean they speak them well enough. At least that's
>>>>what Swiss people tell.
>>>
>>>I've had the experience of trying to communicate with Swiss people who
>>>spoke neither German, Italian or English.
>>
>>
>> Recently I had the experience of doing a job interview only in
>> Italian, and I must say it was hard. He really put me on the spot by
>> asking "So, tell me what you are about" (in Italian of course).
>
>I always had enough trouble with such asinine questions when
>posed in English!

As neither of them spoke decent English, I suspect my efforts at doing
the interview in their were probably wasted. They seemed really
preoccupied by the fact that I didn't have 'manufacturing' experience,
but 'services' instead (as if there's a massive difference), which
seemed really strange to me considering the role would require
learning all that stuff anyway.
--
---
DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
---
--
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 4:04 pm
  #55  
Calif Bill
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Depends where in Switzerland you are planning to travel. I speak decent
Spanish, so can get along somewhat in Italian, and a year of HS French a
long, long time ago, means little. When doing a job in Lausanne years ago,
I needed mostly the niceties. The same as most places. Someone will help
you if you get your manners down. My only problem, is I look German, so a
lot of people will speak German to me, and other than good morning, etc I am
lost. Get a phrase book that gives you the manners words for all 3
languages. You can always look up a word. Reminds me of a trip in 2000 to
Machu Pichu, Peru. We are at a hotel at the bottom of the hill looking for
the orchid garden and an elderly lady is being carried by the staff up to
the train. She is in a wooden chair. Bad ankle. Her friend approached me
and said you did not even know the works for thank you. I wanted to tell
her if she is spending a couple of $K for a trip, and $20 book is cheap.
But being nice that day, just gave her a few words to say.
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 6:44 pm
  #56  
Tim C .
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Following up to Magda <[email protected]> :

>On 2 Jan 2007 07:04:51 -0800, in rec.travel.europe, "Steve G" <[email protected]>
>arranged some electrons, so they looked like this:
>
> ... >>An "intermediate" would not say "La France Sud".
> ...
> ... Why not? I have friends who are native French who are from there and
> ... that's
> ... what they call it.
>
>You have got to be kidding me.
>
> Am I missing something?
>
>A word or two, maybe. Try "Le Sud de la France".

"si si, je suis un Rock Star,
Je 'avez un residence dans le south de france"

--
Tim C.
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 6:46 pm
  #57  
Tim C .
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Following up to "Steve G" <[email protected]> :

>
>Martin wrote:
>> On 2 Jan 2007 07:04:51 -0800, "Steve G" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> >>>An "intermediate" would not say "La France Sud".
>> >
>> >Why not? I have friends who are native French who are from there and
>> >that's
>> >what they call it. Am I missing something?
>>
>> What they really call it.
>>
>>
>> La sud de la France.
>
>RIght you are. J'ai faite une faute. (approximately)
>>
>> Le Midi.
>>
>> Can you bottom post?
>
>Sure, if it makes you happy. Better?


Much better, thanks.
--
Tim C.
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 6:47 pm
  #58  
Tim C .
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Following up to "JohnT" <[email protected]> :

> on my 5th visit to Switzerland that I realised that
>Wanderweg is not a place and that Gesloschen (sp) is not a beer!

[geschlossen]

LOL!
I know the problem.
--
Tim C.
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 6:52 pm
  #59  
Tim C .
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Following up to Jesper Lauridsen <[email protected]> :

>On 2007-01-02, Wolfgang Schwanke <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> For the German and Italian speakers, French is just a foreign language
>> they learn at school. The same is true for Italian respectively. I
>> think all Swiss are supposed to learn each other's languages, but they
>> don't necessarily mean they speak them well enough. At least that's
>> what Swiss people tell.
>
>I've had the experience of trying to communicate with Swiss people who
>spoke neither German, Italian or English.

Rhaeto-Roman-speaking people tend to speak German as well ime, except in
the tiny villages.
French-speaking Swiss are the worst. French or nothing. I find they're even
worse than the reputation that Parisians have.
--
Tim C.
 
Old Jan 9th 2007, 6:56 pm
  #60  
Tim C .
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Best language to focus on for Switzerland trip in 2009

Following up to Keith Anderson <[email protected]> :

>It's never static. Sometimes I lead, sometimes I follow. Sometimes I'm
>funny, sometimes I'm deadly serious.

That's the main point about a /team/. Otherwise it's just a hierarchy. And
as you said, it depends on the team itself, and what its task is.
--
Tim C.
 

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