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baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

Old Oct 12th 2004, 2:34 pm
  #1  
Tim Wilde
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Posts: n/a
Default baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
appreciated.

Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us and cannot
make up our minds whether to go with a stroller or a backpack carrier
for her. Each has it's pros and cons, but we can really only take one.
The backpack would be handy for long walks and on some of the gorges
we may visit in Greece, and may also be better to deal with on crowded
sidewalks. On the other hand we don't know if it would be respectful
to walk into a place like the Blue mosque with a backpack strapped to
my back, and inside buildings or shops it might pose a problem. A
stroller is less strain, convenient to store things on, but can be
annoying to handle in very crowded areas - and of course there will be
places we can't take it in with us, which then means carrying the baby
ourselves and perhaps having the stroller stolen while it remains
unattended. It also is not the best for off-road stuff, even though we
were thinking of taking one of the pneumatic jogging-style types if we
go in this direction. Anyone here who has taken children abroad and
had experiences good or bad with either?

Secondly, I purchased a telephone converter kit to use with our lap
top during the trip, but it doesn't specify which of the units is
suitable for Greece and Turkey. I'd rather not take the whole
collection along to find out which one suits, so can someone tell me
which, if any, of the following apply (They were each marked with
specific countries, and I assume that they are suitable for others as
well. 1)UK 2)Germany 3)India 4)Australia 5)France 6)Italy &
7)Switzerland. I guess if none of them are usable in Greece or Turkey
I've wasted my money!

Thanks in advance......Tim
 
Old Oct 12th 2004, 6:39 pm
  #2  
Miguel Cruz
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Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

tim wilde <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us and cannot
    > make up our minds whether to go with a stroller or a backpack carrier
    > for her. Each has it's pros and cons, but we can really only take one.
    > The backpack would be handy for long walks and on some of the gorges
    > we may visit in Greece, and may also be better to deal with on crowded
    > sidewalks. On the other hand we don't know if it would be respectful
    > to walk into a place like the Blue mosque with a backpack strapped to
    > my back, and inside buildings or shops it might pose a problem.

Should not be a problem in the mosque or anywhere else. Tourists with
backpacks throng Istanbul's sites and attractions.

    > A stroller is less strain, convenient to store things on, but can be
    > annoying to handle in very crowded areas - and of course there will be
    > places we can't take it in with us, which then means carrying the baby
    > ourselves and perhaps having the stroller stolen while it remains
    > unattended.

This (having it stolen) is very unlikely in Turkey at least. However, the
sidewalks aren't always so smooth so it might be a hassle to maneuver.

    > Secondly, I purchased a telephone converter kit to use with our lap
    > top during the trip, but it doesn't specify which of the units is
    > suitable for Greece and Turkey.

In general it's usually much easier to buy adapters like this after you
arrive in the country, especially somewhere like Turkey where such
electrical doodads cost just a few cents instead of the ridiculously
overpriced rates in the USA. But you're in luck because normally these days
they use the US-style RJ phone plugs. Even if there isn't one on the wall
end, you'll be able to unclip the plug from the phone and stick it into your
laptop. If you do run across one of the old Turkish phone plugs, just duck
into the nearest pedestrian underpass and you'll find an adapter in one of
the shops down there for less than the price of a can of Coke - everyone
with old phone jacks needs them because phones, fax machines, etc., all come
with US-style RJ cords.

miguel
--
Hit The Road! Photos from 32 countries on 5 continents: http://travel.u.nu
 
Old Oct 12th 2004, 8:19 pm
  #3  
Miss L. Toe
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

"tim wilde" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected] om...
    > We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    > have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    > appreciated.
    > Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us

My advice - don't go.
One year old is much too young to start travelling.
Wait a couple of years, then any bugs/illnesses she picks up will be much
easier to diagnose.
 
Old Oct 12th 2004, 8:58 pm
  #4  
nitram
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 09:19:38 +0100, "Miss L. Toe"
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >"tim wilde" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. com...
    >> We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    >> have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    >> appreciated.
    >> Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us
    >My advice - don't go.
    >One year old is much too young to start travelling.
    >Wait a couple of years, then any bugs/illnesses she picks up will be much
    >easier to diagnose.

We took both our kids to Greece, when they were under a year old, we
had zero problems.
 
Old Oct 12th 2004, 9:34 pm
  #5  
Miss L. Toe
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 09:19:38 +0100, "Miss L. Toe"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >"tim wilde" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]. com...
    > >> We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    > >> have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    > >> appreciated.
    > >>
    > >> Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us
    > >
    > >My advice - don't go.
    > >One year old is much too young to start travelling.
    > >Wait a couple of years, then any bugs/illnesses she picks up will be much
    > >easier to diagnose.
    > We took both our kids to Greece, when they were under a year old, we
    > had zero problems.

Great - but I have heard of many people who weren't so lucky.
 
Old Oct 12th 2004, 9:46 pm
  #6  
nitram
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 10:34:08 +0100, "Miss L. Toe"
<[email protected]> wrote:

    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected].. .
    >> On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 09:19:38 +0100, "Miss L. Toe"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >"tim wilde" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >news:[email protected]. com...
    >> >> We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    >> >> have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    >> >> appreciated.
    >> >>
    >> >> Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us
    >> >
    >> >My advice - don't go.
    >> >One year old is much too young to start travelling.
    >> >Wait a couple of years, then any bugs/illnesses she picks up will be much
    >> >easier to diagnose.
    >> We took both our kids to Greece, when they were under a year old, we
    >> had zero problems.
    >Great - but I have heard of many people who weren't so lucky.

We had problems taking our kids to UK, when they were in their early
teens, caused by the awful health service! :-)
 
Old Oct 12th 2004, 10:29 pm
  #7  
Tim Challenger
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 10:34:08 +0100, Miss L. Toe wrote:

    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 09:19:38 +0100, "Miss L. Toe"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>"tim wilde" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected] e.com...
    >>>> We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    >>>> have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    >>>> appreciated.
    >>>> Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us
    >>>My advice - don't go.
    >>>One year old is much too young to start travelling.
    >>>Wait a couple of years, then any bugs/illnesses she picks up will be much
    >>>easier to diagnose.
    >> We took both our kids to Greece, when they were under a year old, we
    >> had zero problems.
    >
    > Great - but I have heard of many people who weren't so lucky.

I consider it unlucky if you get a bug, rather than lucky if you don't get
one.

The number of people I know who've been to Greece and Turkey had no
problems far outweigh the number who have.

--
Tim C.
 
Old Oct 13th 2004, 12:58 am
  #8  
Sacha
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

On 13/10/04 9:19, in article [email protected], "Miss L. Toe"
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "tim wilde" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] om...
    >> We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    >> have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    >> appreciated.
    >>
    >> Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us
    >
    > My advice - don't go.
    > One year old is much too young to start travelling.
    > Wait a couple of years, then any bugs/illnesses she picks up will be much
    > easier to diagnose.
    >
    >
If using baby food jars which are widely available, BTW, or the packet foods
to which boiled water is added, the baby may be safer than the adults!
Depends what it's being fed on now but a diet of freshly cooked rice and/or
mushed up veg won't hurt for a week or two.
One word of warning re water - be sure to insist that *all* bottled water is
brought to you with the seal unbroken. I have never forgotten sitting on a
boat in Gocek (Turkey) and watching a crew member from a gulet filling a box
of empty plastic bottles from the pontoon hose, screwing the lids back on
and carrying the water back aboard for the next happy consignment of day
trippers to buy........and don't eat the water melon - the water it's grown
in isn't always er, sanitary!
As to the pushchair versus backpack, have you asked if you can hire one or
the other when you get there? And while I agree that Turks mostly are very
honest and are not thieves, not all tourists are so discriminating.
Personally, I'd say that it's the non-Turks and non-Greeks you have to worry
about rather more.
--

Sacha
(remove the weeds for email)
 
Old Oct 13th 2004, 1:05 am
  #9  
nitram
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 13:58:50 +0100, Sacha
<[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 13/10/04 9:19, in article [email protected], "Miss L. Toe"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> "tim wilde" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected] om...
    >>> We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    >>> have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    >>> appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us
    >>
    >> My advice - don't go.
    >> One year old is much too young to start travelling.
    >> Wait a couple of years, then any bugs/illnesses she picks up will be much
    >> easier to diagnose.
    >>
    >>
    >If using baby food jars which are widely available, BTW, or the packet foods
    >to which boiled water is added, the baby may be safer than the adults!
    >Depends what it's being fed on now but a diet of freshly cooked rice and/or
    >mushed up veg won't hurt for a week or two.
    >One word of warning re water - be sure to insist that *all* bottled water is
    >brought to you with the seal unbroken. I have never forgotten sitting on a
    >boat in Gocek (Turkey) and watching a crew member from a gulet filling a box
    >of empty plastic bottles from the pontoon hose, screwing the lids back on
    >and carrying the water back aboard for the next happy consignment of day
    >trippers to buy........and don't eat the water melon - the water it's grown
    >in isn't always er, sanitary!

We watched the same thing happening in Karpathos.

    >As to the pushchair versus backpack, have you asked if you can hire one or
    >the other when you get there?

It's a pity the original very simple McLaren buggies are no longer
made.

    >And while I agree that Turks mostly are very
    >honest and are not thieves, not all tourists are so discriminating.
    >Personally, I'd say that it's the non-Turks and non-Greeks you have to worry
    >about rather more.

Yes that is our experience too.
 
Old Oct 13th 2004, 1:30 am
  #10  
Des O'Donoghue
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

tim wilde wrote:
    > We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    > have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us and cannot
    > make up our minds whether to go with a stroller or a backpack carrier
    > for her. Each has it's pros and cons, but we can really only take one.
    > The backpack would be handy for long walks and on some of the gorges
    > we may visit in Greece, and may also be better to deal with on crowded
    > sidewalks. On the other hand we don't know if it would be respectful
    > to walk into a place like the Blue mosque with a backpack strapped to
    > my back, and inside buildings or shops it might pose a problem. A
    > stroller is less strain, convenient to store things on, but can be
    > annoying to handle in very crowded areas - and of course there will be
    > places we can't take it in with us, which then means carrying the baby
    > ourselves and perhaps having the stroller stolen while it remains
    > unattended. It also is not the best for off-road stuff, even though we
    > were thinking of taking one of the pneumatic jogging-style types if we
    > go in this direction. Anyone here who has taken children abroad and
    > had experiences good or bad with either?

Having walked around Paris with a backpack carrier with a 1 1/2 year old
in it I suggest you go for the stroller. Things got so bad that we
bought a fairly basic mclaren buggy - very light, folds into very
little, has a carry strap. It doesn't have reclining seat or any of that.

I found having baby on your back was handy in that you had your hands
free but it was a killer, putting it on and off was awkward and I was
always fearful I was going to whack his head..also being on your back
you couldn't really see him and it just didn't feel right.

Even lugging the buggy over barriers in the metro and up and down steps
didn't make me change my mind !
 
Old Oct 13th 2004, 4:52 am
  #11  
Jeremy Henderson
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 11:58:59 +0200, nitram wrote:

    > On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 09:19:38 +0100, "Miss L. Toe"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>"tim wilde" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] .com...
    >>> We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    >>> have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    >>> appreciated.
    >>> Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us
    >>My advice - don't go.
    >>One year old is much too young to start travelling.
    >>Wait a couple of years, then any bugs/illnesses she picks up will be much
    >>easier to diagnose.
    >
    > We took both our kids to Greece, when they were under a year old, we
    > had zero problems.

Likewise - we've been to Greece with my daughter at least once a year
since she was zero years old and she's never had a health problem (unlike
me, who was concerned about the danger of the hot sun on a small baby and
forgot to see if he was burning himself - dimwit!)

As for a buggy, I'd recommend the simplest possible - the old Maclaren
"fold up like an umbrella" ones were ideal.

J;

--
Encrypted e-mail address. Click to mail me:
http://cerbermail.com/?nKYh3qN4YG
 
Old Oct 14th 2004, 3:08 am
  #12  
Brian Wasson
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

Kelty makes a cool stroller/backpack carrier combo called the
"convertible." It looks like a regular Kelty K.I.D.S. backback child
carrier, but it also has stroller wheels on it. I saw it in a store
the other day and it looked like a really good idea. The weight is
only about 9 pounds, too. You can see it on their Web site at
www.kelty.com.

Let us know how it goes when you get back. My wife and I are avid
travlers and are expecting our first child in December. We're looking
forward to exposing him to the wonders of the world!


Des O'Donoghue <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > tim wilde wrote:
    > > We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    > > have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    > > appreciated.
    > >
    > > Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us and cannot
    > > make up our minds whether to go with a stroller or a backpack carrier
    > > for her.
 
Old Oct 14th 2004, 2:06 pm
  #13  
Bogus Address
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: baby carriers/telephone converters in Greece & Turkey

    > We are about to head off to Greece & Turkey for a couple of weeks and
    > have a couple of questions. Any views on the subjects highly
    > appreciated.
    > Firstly, we are taking our one year old daughter with us and cannot
    > make up our minds whether to go with a stroller or a backpack carrier
    > for her.

If you're thinking about using dolmuses in Turkey you would be out
of your mind to consider anything other than a front pouch. It's
quite usual for a minibus to be filled with 50% more people than it
has seats, along with their assorted suitcases, polypropylene sacks,
plastic buckets, bolts of fabric, folding stoolsteps, garden rakes,
500m rolls of baling twine, wholesale packs of baby formula, caged
pigeons and TV aerial installation kits, all of which will be twice
as complicated to pack because the bus's official disgruntled old
granny (they all seem to have one) insists that her little Ahmet
shouldn't have to move as he was there first. You will end up with
the stroller handles wrapped round the gearshift while the wheels
embed themselves in granny's watermelon.

Buses are not a lot more predictable. It took years before I got all
the marble dust out of my rucksack from when it shared the luggage
compartment with a consignment of gravestones near Trabzon.

You just about never see Turks using strollers and there's a good
reason why not. People try to be considerate, but speed, chaos and
crowding is just the way it is on Turkish public transport. Nearly
all Turkish mothers use some form of front sling to carry their
babies in, so people's instincts are to allow space in front of a
woman who might be carrying a child. Defying this expectation is
like driving on the wrong side of the road.

========> Email to "j-c" at this site; email to "bogus" will bounce <========
Jack Campin: 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU; 0131 6604760
<http://www.purr.demon.co.uk/purrhome.html> food intolerance data & recipes,
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