Re: What to take???

Old Aug 30th 2004, 5:17 pm
  #1  
tempusedaxrerum99
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to take???

Hi Dave,

Nice list, but I do question the advisability of telling clients to
take small gifts for local kids (who often beg for these). (Its a
different matter if the gifts are for camp staff...though I think they
would prefer cash!) This story about "gifts for kids" seems to make
the rounds of US tourists going on safari. The truth is, that (1)
practices like this train kids to become beggars (2)tourists have NO
way of distributing this stuff to the kids that really could use them--
the same kids on the same popular routes tend to get them time after
time (3) it can encourage kids who might otherwise be in school to be
truants...because they can make good money collecting these trinkets
and reselling them. I think it would be better to tell clients to give
appropriate gifts or donations to local charitable organizations or
schools. The best thing I have found: BOOKS. Many schools don't even
have a dictionary or atlas, and they are thrilled to get a paperback.
And camp staffers get really excited by current paperbacks and current
magazines. I bet the local camps could come up with a few alternatives
(they certainly have in places where I have travelled.)

A few more items that I found really useful:
1) beige or brown bandanna (good over nose for dusty rides, smelly
carcasses etc, also a cool headband when wet, keeps sun off back of
neck, etc)
2)if hiking, a small role of breathable first aid tape (more useful
than band-aids or moleskin for blisters, also good for patching
mosquito net holes, etc.)
3)keyring sized LED microlight-- wear on a cord around neck or wrist,
or on zipper pull of jacket-- invaluable for camera adjustments during
night drives, and for finding the real flashlight in the middle of the
night
4)sunscreen (might have missed this on your list)
5) For photographers-- a static-charged dust brush (works much better
than air bulbs and lenspapers in dusty places.)
Dave Patterson wrote:
    > Here's the Checklist we provide our clients
    > for east Africa:
    > Passport - Tickets - Cash and Traveler's Checks
    > Sleeping Pills - Ambien is a prescription medication we use
    > Over the counter products are also effective and drugstore
brands
    > are as good as brand names, in our experience
    > Lariam or Malarone (the prescription malaria preventive
    > medications)
    > Electricity Converter and Adapter - The 3-prong adapter is
used
    > in Kenya
    > Pepto-Bismol tablets - 2 each day will help prevent diarrhea
    > Imodium A-D - the best anti-diarrheal medication; Bring It!
    > A laxative - yes! Sometimes your system needs a little help!
    > Bufferin - Tylenol - Sudafed - Contac, or other cold
    > medication
    > Camera - lots of Film - CHECK YOUR BATTERIES
    > Small Flashlight - CHECK YOUR BATTERIES
    > A travel alarm clock - CHECK YOUR BATTERIES
    > A sleep mask for the plane - British Airways supplies a small
    > onboard kit that
    > you will find at your seat when you board. It includes a sleep mask,
a
    > toothbrush and toothpaste, and a pair of socks to wear on the plane.
    > Detergent for washing clothing - (Laundry service is available
at
    > the Camps)
    > Travel Kleenex - Wash'N'Dri packets
    > Insect repellent - we suggest products with DEET
    > Sunglasses - Hat or Cap
    > A map of Kenya if you choose
    > IMPORTANT!!!! - XEROX the first 2 pages of your passport
with
    > your photo & the details of the date of issue, passport number, etc.
    > Take this along, but in a separate place and not in your checked
    > baggage.
    > ITEMS YOU MIGHT LIKE TO HAVE WITH YOU
    > NOTE! DECAFFEINATED COFFEE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN ALL CAMPS!
    > But, hot water is always available... so if you bring your own
De-Caf,
    > you can have it whenever you choose.
    > BINOCULARS - If you bring a pair, 10X50 might be best. These are
    > available at discount stores for $30 to $50. But, they are heavy, of
    > course. 10X25 are also useful, but have a smaller field of view.
    > If you would like to bring small gifts, T-shirts & caps (with logos)
    > and/or ball point pens are always welcome. Also welcome are school
    > supplies such as notebook paper, notepads, coloring pencils, etc. for
    > the children. Note, however, opportunities to hand these out will be
    > limited.
 
Old Aug 31st 2004, 1:11 pm
  #2  
Chris
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What to take???

[email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi Dave,
    >
    > Nice list, but I do question the advisability of telling clients to
    > take small gifts for local kids (who often beg for these). (Its a
    > different matter if the gifts are for camp staff...though I think they
    > would prefer cash!) This story about "gifts for kids" seems to make
    > the rounds of US tourists going on safari. The truth is, that (1)
    > practices like this train kids to become beggars (2)tourists have NO
    > way of distributing this stuff to the kids that really could use them--
    > the same kids on the same popular routes tend to get them time after
    > time (3) it can encourage kids who might otherwise be in school to be
    > truants...because they can make good money collecting these trinkets
    > and reselling them. I think it would be better to tell clients to give
    > appropriate gifts or donations to local charitable organizations or
    > schools. The best thing I have found: BOOKS. Many schools don't even
    > have a dictionary or atlas, and they are thrilled to get a paperback.
    > And camp staffers get really excited by current paperbacks and current
    > magazines. I bet the local camps could come up with a few alternatives
    > (they certainly have in places where I have travelled.)
    >
    > A few more items that I found really useful:
    > 1) beige or brown bandanna (good over nose for dusty rides, smelly
    > carcasses etc, also a cool headband when wet, keeps sun off back of
    > neck, etc)
    > 2)if hiking, a small role of breathable first aid tape (more useful
    > than band-aids or moleskin for blisters, also good for patching
    > mosquito net holes, etc.)
    > 3)keyring sized LED microlight-- wear on a cord around neck or wrist,
    > or on zipper pull of jacket-- invaluable for camera adjustments during
    > night drives, and for finding the real flashlight in the middle of the
    > night
    > 4)sunscreen (might have missed this on your list)
    > 5) For photographers-- a static-charged dust brush (works much better
    > than air bulbs and lenspapers in dusty places.)
    > Dave Patterson wrote:
    > > Here's the Checklist we provide our clients
    > > for east Africa:
    > >
    > > Passport - Tickets - Cash and Traveler's Checks
    > > Sleeping Pills - Ambien is a prescription medication we use
    > > Over the counter products are also effective and drugstore
    > brands
    > > are as good as brand names, in our experience
    > > Lariam or Malarone (the prescription malaria preventive
    > > medications)
    > > Electricity Converter and Adapter - The 3-prong adapter is
    > used
    > > in Kenya
    > > Pepto-Bismol tablets - 2 each day will help prevent diarrhea
    > > Imodium A-D - the best anti-diarrheal medication; Bring It!
    > > A laxative - yes! Sometimes your system needs a little help!
    > > Bufferin - Tylenol - Sudafed - Contac, or other cold
    > > medication
    > > Camera - lots of Film - CHECK YOUR BATTERIES
    > > Small Flashlight - CHECK YOUR BATTERIES
    > > A travel alarm clock - CHECK YOUR BATTERIES
    > > A sleep mask for the plane - British Airways supplies a small
    > > onboard kit that
    > > you will find at your seat when you board. It includes a sleep mask,
    > a
    > > toothbrush and toothpaste, and a pair of socks to wear on the plane.
    > > Detergent for washing clothing - (Laundry service is available
    > at
    > > the Camps)
    > > Travel Kleenex - Wash'N'Dri packets
    > > Insect repellent - we suggest products with DEET
    > > Sunglasses - Hat or Cap
    > > A map of Kenya if you choose
    > >
    > > IMPORTANT!!!! - XEROX the first 2 pages of your passport
    > with
    > > your photo & the details of the date of issue, passport number, etc.
    > > Take this along, but in a separate place and not in your checked
    > > baggage.
    > >
    > > ITEMS YOU MIGHT LIKE TO HAVE WITH YOU
    > >
    > > NOTE! DECAFFEINATED COFFEE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN ALL CAMPS!
    > > But, hot water is always available... so if you bring your own
    > De-Caf,
    > > you can have it whenever you choose.
    > >
    > > BINOCULARS - If you bring a pair, 10X50 might be best. These are
    > > available at discount stores for $30 to $50. But, they are heavy, of
    > > course. 10X25 are also useful, but have a smaller field of view.
    > >
    > > If you would like to bring small gifts, T-shirts & caps (with logos)
    > > and/or ball point pens are always welcome. Also welcome are school
    > > supplies such as notebook paper, notepads, coloring pencils, etc. for
    > > the children. Note, however, opportunities to hand these out will be
    > > limited.

This is my second contribution to this thread as I posted the first
response before reading the complete thread. I agree STRONGLY that
giving gifts to children is totally unacceptable. However, I have
found that cheap ball point pens can be used for barter instead of
paying cash with some adults. Chris
 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.