Life in NZ

Old Oct 18th 2005, 10:17 pm
  #1  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Pomki is an unknown quantity at this point
Smile Life in NZ

this is a bit of a longun, but, I have read many posts about how people are struggling to live since coming to NZ. So I thought I would take a moment to give a snapshot of my life since moving to NZ.

I live in a small town called Omarama, in the south island. It is on state highway8. three and a half hours south of Christchurch, and 2 1/4 hours before Queenstown. Its a small town of only about 400 residents in the winter rising by a couple of hundred in the summer.

Its the sort of small community, where I am greeted every time I go into the shop by name. I dont need to call a mate to go to the pub with, because I can go there on my own anytime and know people already there.
I have a regular job here that has a package worth about $50 grand a year. Not a lot compared to all the salaries everyone talks about. But to be honest I have trouble spending the money and am actually repaying my UK debts with these wages as well.

Work is cool, although it does appear to get in the way of my social life quite a bit.

Lets see, Winter has come to a close, with which I spent as much time as possible at the local ski field, a mere 1/2 an hour from my house. (thats right. Not a three hour flight to Europe) but a 1/2 hour drive.

Summer is arriving so I have started learning to fly gliders in what is generally known as the best gliding spot in the world, where many a record has been broken, and will be the host of the inaugural Gliding Grand Prix in January.
Only yesterday, a chap popped his head in my office door, and asked Fancy going Hand gliding?' And an hour later I was stepping off the side of the mountain soaring with a Kestrel.
But its not all fun around the breathtakingly beautiful Southern Alps which surround this town I live in, or flying overhead in the constantly beautiful weather.

No,,, I also have to put up with the fantastic lakes and rivers which surround me. The locals like any excuse to get out on their boats, so at weekends I might go water skiing, fishing (Oamarama is known to be one of the best fishing spots going, with many a trophy photo of some outrageously huge fish donning most household walls here), then there is the sailing, windsurfing, kayaking etc.. Or maybe just relaxing with the dog at the lake or rivers edge with the barbie going, a bunch of friends and a bottle of local wine.

Of course sometimes I like to have a little privacy. And as you can imagine its merely a short walk to complete solitude. That can even be on the Golf course, which I have paid my $100 dollars for a full years membership, allowing me free golf in four local courses. I have never had to book a tee time, that would be just plain silly.

Obviously this is my view on life here. There are many aspects important to others, like the local school. The mums and dads looking after baby Alex who might head up to one of the local farms for a cuppa and to watch the world go by. Any questions about this place, ask away.

To be honest I could tell you so much about this small town. From the excitement and value of being a volunteer firefighter to going to dance class on a Tuesday night. And this is just a small town, not a big city with so many other things to do.
And to think I used to spend 2 hrs driving along the M25 into work in the UK. To a job that struggled to cover the fuel, parking and general living costs. And just sapped my life. A life where I never dreamed of doing the things I do here.
I did not walk straight into this life here. It took me 7 months for it to come along. But through the hard times I stuck to it. And would not give up NZ and the people for anything.

It would be great to hear about other peoples lives.
What you are getting up to, now you are living in NZ.

Chris.
Pomki is offline  
Old Oct 18th 2005, 10:36 pm
  #2  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Location: Niagara Falls, Ontario
Posts: 248
CWEMM02 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by Pomki
this is a bit of a longun, but, I have read many posts about how people are struggling to live since coming to NZ. So I thought I would take a moment to give a snapshot of my life since moving to NZ.

I live in a small town called Omarama, in the south island. It is on state highway8. three and a half hours south of Christchurch, and 2 1/4 hours before Queenstown. Its a small town of only about 400 residents in the winter rising by a couple of hundred in the summer.

Its the sort of small community, where I am greeted every time I go into the shop by name. I dont need to call a mate to go to the pub with, because I can go there on my own anytime and know people already there.
I have a regular job here that has a package worth about $50 grand a year. Not a lot compared to all the salaries everyone talks about. But to be honest I have trouble spending the money and am actually repaying my UK debts with these wages as well.

Work is cool, although it does appear to get in the way of my social life quite a bit.

Lets see, Winter has come to a close, with which I spent as much time as possible at the local ski field, a mere 1/2 an hour from my house. (thats right. Not a three hour flight to Europe) but a 1/2 hour drive.

Summer is arriving so I have started learning to fly gliders in what is generally known as the best gliding spot in the world, where many a record has been broken, and will be the host of the inaugural Gliding Grand Prix in January.
Only yesterday, a chap popped his head in my office door, and asked Fancy going Hand gliding?' And an hour later I was stepping off the side of the mountain soaring with a Kestrel.
But its not all fun around the breathtakingly beautiful Southern Alps which surround this town I live in, or flying overhead in the constantly beautiful weather.

No,,, I also have to put up with the fantastic lakes and rivers which surround me. The locals like any excuse to get out on their boats, so at weekends I might go water skiing, fishing (Oamarama is known to be one of the best fishing spots going, with many a trophy photo of some outrageously huge fish donning most household walls here), then there is the sailing, windsurfing, kayaking etc.. Or maybe just relaxing with the dog at the lake or rivers edge with the barbie going, a bunch of friends and a bottle of local wine.

Of course sometimes I like to have a little privacy. And as you can imagine its merely a short walk to complete solitude. That can even be on the Golf course, which I have paid my $100 dollars for a full years membership, allowing me free golf in four local courses. I have never had to book a tee time, that would be just plain silly.

Obviously this is my view on life here. There are many aspects important to others, like the local school. The mums and dads looking after baby Alex who might head up to one of the local farms for a cuppa and to watch the world go by. Any questions about this place, ask away.

To be honest I could tell you so much about this small town. From the excitement and value of being a volunteer firefighter to going to dance class on a Tuesday night. And this is just a small town, not a big city with so many other things to do.
And to think I used to spend 2 hrs driving along the M25 into work in the UK. To a job that struggled to cover the fuel, parking and general living costs. And just sapped my life. A life where I never dreamed of doing the things I do here.
I did not walk straight into this life here. It took me 7 months for it to come along. But through the hard times I stuck to it. And would not give up NZ and the people for anything.

It would be great to hear about other peoples lives.
What you are getting up to, now you are living in NZ.

Chris.
Chris, what do you do there for work? I am a Chartered Accountant who likes the setting you described.
CWEMM02 is offline  
Old Oct 18th 2005, 11:26 pm
  #3  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Pomki is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Life in NZ

I work in a small Hotel. Our accounting is done within the group up the Road at the next town Twizel. Twizel is about 25 mins away and larger than here, with a population in the thousands somewhere.
Not working in the accounting side of things I dont know much about where the practices are. But hold tight and I will ask when I am in work later. Although I am sure there must be plenty around to furnish all the farms and wineries here. Maybe we need someone to set up in town??
Also with Queenstown deeper into the lakes and mountains. This is a big town with a now international airport. It is very big into the tens of thousands living there. And plenty of big business so there would be more accountacy based work there.
There are plenty of towns like this in the south Island with plenty of different opportunities in them all. And all so close to the mountains and lakes.

Right, time to head to the airfield, weather is looking good for a short flight, before work!!
Pomki is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 12:25 am
  #4  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: Bay of Plenty, NZ
Posts: 191
Herm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant future
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by Pomki
this is a bit of a longun, but, I have read many posts about how people are struggling to live since coming to NZ. So I thought I would take a moment to give a snapshot of my life since moving to NZ.

I live in a small town called Omarama, in the south island. It is on state highway8. three and a half hours south of Christchurch, and 2 1/4 hours before Queenstown. Its a small town of only about 400 residents in the winter rising by a couple of hundred in the summer.

Its the sort of small community, where I am greeted every time I go into the shop by name. I dont need to call a mate to go to the pub with, because I can go there on my own anytime and know people already there.
I have a regular job here that has a package worth about $50 grand a year. Not a lot compared to all the salaries everyone talks about. But to be honest I have trouble spending the money and am actually repaying my UK debts with these wages as well.

Work is cool, although it does appear to get in the way of my social life quite a bit.

Lets see, Winter has come to a close, with which I spent as much time as possible at the local ski field, a mere 1/2 an hour from my house. (thats right. Not a three hour flight to Europe) but a 1/2 hour drive.

Summer is arriving so I have started learning to fly gliders in what is generally known as the best gliding spot in the world, where many a record has been broken, and will be the host of the inaugural Gliding Grand Prix in January.
Only yesterday, a chap popped his head in my office door, and asked Fancy going Hand gliding?' And an hour later I was stepping off the side of the mountain soaring with a Kestrel.
But its not all fun around the breathtakingly beautiful Southern Alps which surround this town I live in, or flying overhead in the constantly beautiful weather.

No,,, I also have to put up with the fantastic lakes and rivers which surround me. The locals like any excuse to get out on their boats, so at weekends I might go water skiing, fishing (Oamarama is known to be one of the best fishing spots going, with many a trophy photo of some outrageously huge fish donning most household walls here), then there is the sailing, windsurfing, kayaking etc.. Or maybe just relaxing with the dog at the lake or rivers edge with the barbie going, a bunch of friends and a bottle of local wine.

Of course sometimes I like to have a little privacy. And as you can imagine its merely a short walk to complete solitude. That can even be on the Golf course, which I have paid my $100 dollars for a full years membership, allowing me free golf in four local courses. I have never had to book a tee time, that would be just plain silly.

Obviously this is my view on life here. There are many aspects important to others, like the local school. The mums and dads looking after baby Alex who might head up to one of the local farms for a cuppa and to watch the world go by. Any questions about this place, ask away.

To be honest I could tell you so much about this small town. From the excitement and value of being a volunteer firefighter to going to dance class on a Tuesday night. And this is just a small town, not a big city with so many other things to do.
And to think I used to spend 2 hrs driving along the M25 into work in the UK. To a job that struggled to cover the fuel, parking and general living costs. And just sapped my life. A life where I never dreamed of doing the things I do here.
I did not walk straight into this life here. It took me 7 months for it to come along. But through the hard times I stuck to it. And would not give up NZ and the people for anything.

It would be great to hear about other peoples lives.
What you are getting up to, now you are living in NZ.

Chris.

Chris - good to hear the positive side of things.

I emigrated (with wife and kids) from the South East early 2001. We had decided on the North Island but beyond that had no idea where we would live or what we would do. Picked up a hire car and explored - it was fun (ish) - Wife, 3 kids, 13 bits of luggage and not a clue what we were doing.

We ended up in Katikati a small town north of Tauranga - we arrived on a wednesday, booked into a motel and had a good nights sleep. The following day tried to register the kids for school but no go - we needed a perm address. Next stop Estate Agents - luck was on our side and we managed to find a 4 bed, fully furnished, use of linen at the local beach - moved in on the friday. Kids started school the following monday.

Work I heard someone say. Had not given a thought to it but after a few weeks honeymoon thought I should start looking. Bad move - 3 days later I had a contract job in Tauranga - it lasted 18 months.

That was the start of our adventure. Since arriving its not all been good. I've had a couple of periods of unemployment - 3 months then 9 months - but kept pluging away and finally landed a perm job a couple of years ago. I

I no longer commute along the M4 every day and I know exactly how long its going to take me to get to work. My work hours are not only fixed - a standard day and I'm done so no working early mornings and late evenings. I don't get the same annual leave as I had in the UK but work is far more flexible - I need a couple of hours off - I take a couple of hours off.

I am not stressed.

Every weekend seems like a holiday and I go back to work on a monday feeling refreshed. No more queing at Tesco's on a saturday morning to find a parking space, no more fighting the crowds in town to move from one store to the next. We seem to have much more time - from November to May we make it to the beach at least once over the weekend, we cook and eat out doors the whole summer. I have started to surf again - something I'd not done since I was a teenager, the bikes have been taken out of mothballs and the walking boots (which I don't think I'd EVER worn in the UK) have been cleaned and put into action. Even the dog gets to go on long walks.

I would not go back to the UK other than to visit. The lifestyle here allows me to do things I would not and could not have done in the UK.

Don't you love it......
Herm is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 6:24 am
  #5  
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 98
ElizabethC is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by Pomki
this is a bit of a longun, but, I have read many posts about how people are struggling to live since coming to NZ. So I thought I would take a moment to give a snapshot of my life since moving to NZ.

I live in a small town called Omarama, in the south island. It is on state highway8. three and a half hours south of Christchurch, and 2 1/4 hours before Queenstown. Its a small town of only about 400 residents in the winter rising by a couple of hundred in the summer.

Its the sort of small community, where I am greeted every time I go into the shop by name. I dont need to call a mate to go to the pub with, because I can go there on my own anytime and know people already there.
I have a regular job here that has a package worth about $50 grand a year. Not a lot compared to all the salaries everyone talks about. But to be honest I have trouble spending the money and am actually repaying my UK debts with these wages as well.

Work is cool, although it does appear to get in the way of my social life quite a bit.

Lets see, Winter has come to a close, with which I spent as much time as possible at the local ski field, a mere 1/2 an hour from my house. (thats right. Not a three hour flight to Europe) but a 1/2 hour drive.

Summer is arriving so I have started learning to fly gliders in what is generally known as the best gliding spot in the world, where many a record has been broken, and will be the host of the inaugural Gliding Grand Prix in January.
Only yesterday, a chap popped his head in my office door, and asked Fancy going Hand gliding?' And an hour later I was stepping off the side of the mountain soaring with a Kestrel.
But its not all fun around the breathtakingly beautiful Southern Alps which surround this town I live in, or flying overhead in the constantly beautiful weather.

No,,, I also have to put up with the fantastic lakes and rivers which surround me. The locals like any excuse to get out on their boats, so at weekends I might go water skiing, fishing (Oamarama is known to be one of the best fishing spots going, with many a trophy photo of some outrageously huge fish donning most household walls here), then there is the sailing, windsurfing, kayaking etc.. Or maybe just relaxing with the dog at the lake or rivers edge with the barbie going, a bunch of friends and a bottle of local wine.

Of course sometimes I like to have a little privacy. And as you can imagine its merely a short walk to complete solitude. That can even be on the Golf course, which I have paid my $100 dollars for a full years membership, allowing me free golf in four local courses. I have never had to book a tee time, that would be just plain silly.

Obviously this is my view on life here. There are many aspects important to others, like the local school. The mums and dads looking after baby Alex who might head up to one of the local farms for a cuppa and to watch the world go by. Any questions about this place, ask away.

To be honest I could tell you so much about this small town. From the excitement and value of being a volunteer firefighter to going to dance class on a Tuesday night. And this is just a small town, not a big city with so many other things to do.
And to think I used to spend 2 hrs driving along the M25 into work in the UK. To a job that struggled to cover the fuel, parking and general living costs. And just sapped my life. A life where I never dreamed of doing the things I do here.
I did not walk straight into this life here. It took me 7 months for it to come along. But through the hard times I stuck to it. And would not give up NZ and the people for anything.

It would be great to hear about other peoples lives.
What you are getting up to, now you are living in NZ.

Chris.
Wonderful post -thank you>

Nice post from Herm too
ElizabethC is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 8:24 am
  #6  
BE Forum Addict
 
SarahB's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: Beachlands, East Auckland
Posts: 2,957
SarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Life in NZ

Despite having the lurgies (see Lurgie post)...I managed to get out to ride my new horse over the weekend.... it was such nice weather on Sunday I just had to make the most of it even though I dont feel 100%.

It was raining when I got on him and we rode off down the road. I got to the end of the road and the sun came out and it was lovely!! Then I saw all these riders riding in the edge of the sea... I trotted down the road to see how they got there and found several horse boxes (floats as they call them here) parked up and lots of people tacking up or riding off round the mangroves.... I never knew all that was there! It looked totally gorgeous and I cant wait to go riding there at low tide sometime.

It was so nice down there and everyone I met was really friendly and chatted to me. I came back on such a high...my horse is only young (ex NZ harness racer) but he behaved so well and the scenery is so stunning and its one of my ambitions to ride a horse in the sea and Ive never managed to do it so far whilst in the UK.

It made my week...specially after feeling so poorly too. I'm a full time mum so having those few hours to myself and to have such a great time is so important.

Yep.... I love it too!!
SarahB is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 8:54 am
  #7  
 
bookemjano's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 692
bookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to behold
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by SarahB
Despite having the lurgies (see Lurgie post)...I managed to get out to ride my new horse over the weekend.... it was such nice weather on Sunday I just had to make the most of it even though I dont feel 100%.

It was raining when I got on him and we rode off down the road. I got to the end of the road and the sun came out and it was lovely!! Then I saw all these riders riding in the edge of the sea... I trotted down the road to see how they got there and found several horse boxes (floats as they call them here) parked up and lots of people tacking up or riding off round the mangroves.... I never knew all that was there! It looked totally gorgeous and I cant wait to go riding there at low tide sometime.

It was so nice down there and everyone I met was really friendly and chatted to me. I came back on such a high...my horse is only young (ex NZ harness racer) but he behaved so well and the scenery is so stunning and its one of my ambitions to ride a horse in the sea and Ive never managed to do it so far whilst in the UK.

It made my week...specially after feeling so poorly too. I'm a full time mum so having those few hours to myself and to have such a great time is so important.

Yep.... I love it too!!
Sarah - what name did you settle on for him? I can't find the thread on it.
bookemjano is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 8:56 am
  #8  
 
bookemjano's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 692
bookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to behold
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by Pomki
this is a bit of a longun, but, I have read many posts about how people are struggling to live since coming to NZ. So I thought I would take a moment to give a snapshot of my life since moving to NZ.

I live in a small town called Omarama, in the south island. It is on state highway8. three and a half hours south of Christchurch, and 2 1/4 hours before Queenstown. Its a small town of only about 400 residents in the winter rising by a couple of hundred in the summer.

Its the sort of small community, where I am greeted every time I go into the shop by name. I dont need to call a mate to go to the pub with, because I can go there on my own anytime and know people already there.
I have a regular job here that has a package worth about $50 grand a year. Not a lot compared to all the salaries everyone talks about. But to be honest I have trouble spending the money and am actually repaying my UK debts with these wages as well.

Work is cool, although it does appear to get in the way of my social life quite a bit.

Lets see, Winter has come to a close, with which I spent as much time as possible at the local ski field, a mere 1/2 an hour from my house. (thats right. Not a three hour flight to Europe) but a 1/2 hour drive.

Summer is arriving so I have started learning to fly gliders in what is generally known as the best gliding spot in the world, where many a record has been broken, and will be the host of the inaugural Gliding Grand Prix in January.
Only yesterday, a chap popped his head in my office door, and asked Fancy going Hand gliding?' And an hour later I was stepping off the side of the mountain soaring with a Kestrel.
But its not all fun around the breathtakingly beautiful Southern Alps which surround this town I live in, or flying overhead in the constantly beautiful weather.

No,,, I also have to put up with the fantastic lakes and rivers which surround me. The locals like any excuse to get out on their boats, so at weekends I might go water skiing, fishing (Oamarama is known to be one of the best fishing spots going, with many a trophy photo of some outrageously huge fish donning most household walls here), then there is the sailing, windsurfing, kayaking etc.. Or maybe just relaxing with the dog at the lake or rivers edge with the barbie going, a bunch of friends and a bottle of local wine.

Of course sometimes I like to have a little privacy. And as you can imagine its merely a short walk to complete solitude. That can even be on the Golf course, which I have paid my $100 dollars for a full years membership, allowing me free golf in four local courses. I have never had to book a tee time, that would be just plain silly.

Obviously this is my view on life here. There are many aspects important to others, like the local school. The mums and dads looking after baby Alex who might head up to one of the local farms for a cuppa and to watch the world go by. Any questions about this place, ask away.

To be honest I could tell you so much about this small town. From the excitement and value of being a volunteer firefighter to going to dance class on a Tuesday night. And this is just a small town, not a big city with so many other things to do.
And to think I used to spend 2 hrs driving along the M25 into work in the UK. To a job that struggled to cover the fuel, parking and general living costs. And just sapped my life. A life where I never dreamed of doing the things I do here.
I did not walk straight into this life here. It took me 7 months for it to come along. But through the hard times I stuck to it. And would not give up NZ and the people for anything.

It would be great to hear about other peoples lives.
What you are getting up to, now you are living in NZ.

Chris.
Fantastic post Chris! Good on you.

If you're looking for somewhere to invest that spare money I've two teenagers needing college fees in a few years ...... No? Oh well, always worth a go.
bookemjano is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 8:58 am
  #9  
 
bookemjano's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 692
bookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to beholdbookemjano is a splendid one to behold
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by Herm
Chris - good to hear the positive side of things.

I emigrated (with wife and kids) from the South East early 2001. We had decided on the North Island but beyond that had no idea where we would live or what we would do. Picked up a hire car and explored - it was fun (ish) - Wife, 3 kids, 13 bits of luggage and not a clue what we were doing.

We ended up in Katikati a small town north of Tauranga - we arrived on a wednesday, booked into a motel and had a good nights sleep. The following day tried to register the kids for school but no go - we needed a perm address. Next stop Estate Agents - luck was on our side and we managed to find a 4 bed, fully furnished, use of linen at the local beach - moved in on the friday. Kids started school the following monday.

Work I heard someone say. Had not given a thought to it but after a few weeks honeymoon thought I should start looking. Bad move - 3 days later I had a contract job in Tauranga - it lasted 18 months.

That was the start of our adventure. Since arriving its not all been good. I've had a couple of periods of unemployment - 3 months then 9 months - but kept pluging away and finally landed a perm job a couple of years ago. I

I no longer commute along the M4 every day and I know exactly how long its going to take me to get to work. My work hours are not only fixed - a standard day and I'm done so no working early mornings and late evenings. I don't get the same annual leave as I had in the UK but work is far more flexible - I need a couple of hours off - I take a couple of hours off.

I am not stressed.

Every weekend seems like a holiday and I go back to work on a monday feeling refreshed. No more queing at Tesco's on a saturday morning to find a parking space, no more fighting the crowds in town to move from one store to the next. We seem to have much more time - from November to May we make it to the beach at least once over the weekend, we cook and eat out doors the whole summer. I have started to surf again - something I'd not done since I was a teenager, the bikes have been taken out of mothballs and the walking boots (which I don't think I'd EVER worn in the UK) have been cleaned and put into action. Even the dog gets to go on long walks.

I would not go back to the UK other than to visit. The lifestyle here allows me to do things I would not and could not have done in the UK.

Don't you love it......
You too Herm! Glad to see you having a ball, it's what it's all about isn't it!
bookemjano is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 9:38 am
  #10  
BE Forum Addict
 
SarahB's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: Beachlands, East Auckland
Posts: 2,957
SarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond reputeSarahB has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by bookemjano
Sarah - what name did you settle on for him? I can't find the thread on it.
Hiya!! I called him Zack.... no reason in particular... just couldnt decide on anything else. His racing name is Brutal Force... although he never raced.
SarahB is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 8:23 pm
  #11  
Forum Regular
 
JaneAS's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 159
JaneAS is a jewel in the roughJaneAS is a jewel in the roughJaneAS is a jewel in the roughJaneAS is a jewel in the roughJaneAS is a jewel in the rough
Default Re: Life in NZ

Nice post, acts as a good balance for all the negative stuff I've been reading recently!

Pomki, can I ask how you migrated there, was it as a skilled migrant? And did you find the job when you got there, or before you went? I'm just wondering how you found such a great job & location?

Thanks,
JaneAS
JaneAS is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 11:45 pm
  #12  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Pomki is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Life in NZ

I hope this will make sense.
Last night we had our monthly meeting in the fire brigade, which lasts for an hour or two. But for some reason I always feel hungover in the morning after these....

SarahB it sounds great up there. You have given me the idea to hook up with one of the farmers here and have a go at this horse riding lark. I have have never done it before, but have heard about some people who will take you on the horses for several days and camp out under the stars. That sounds awesome!


In answer to Janes question
As far as my arriving in NZ. I was very lucky. I was eligible under the dissent category, as my granddad was born here.
This allowed my dad to apply for his passport, and through my dad I got mine. Although If I had kids born in the UK they would not have been eligible, yet Kids now born in NZ can apply for a British passport the other way around.
I took the first ropey job I was offered in Chch for rubbish wages when I arrived. And only came across this job through word of mouth. I was asked to take it. There are plenty of opportunities for jobs especially in the hospitality trade around the country, as the tourist trade is a major income to the country. And in small towns like this, it is often hard to find a decent workforce. This is because everyone wants to go to the big cities. Which is why I tell all my incoming staff, this is the place to save loads of money. Because unless you are in the pub getting bo!!oxed every night, you are not wasting it. And it does not cost a fortune to live. When I lived in CHC I drove everywhere. Whereas here there is no need. It take about two minutes on the bike to cover the town The car is there if I just need to head to the big shops.

The one thing I have found about kiwis, is they are sooooo damn helpful. As long as you get out, meet them and make friends, they often know someone or something that can be of help.
When I first moved to NZ, I pitched up at the house I was renting, with nothing but a suit case. And within 24 hrs, all the neighbours were round with furniture, a TV, beds, crockery etc... I love telling people back home about these instances that have happened to me since being here.

So anyway, I am waffling off subject (a common trait with me)
I had never heard of Omarama, and to be honest most of the tourists that go through, see a shop and a pub and think, thats it. Nothing here. But I only found out what this spot has to offer, because i committed myself to the place and spent a month getting out meeting people, and being told about these things. I was lucky it did not take that long to come across this job and place. And it was purely through my friends I am here, otherwise i may still be in a dead end job in Chch, earning just enough to pay the bills and buy 3 pints at the local on a Friday night.
I have a friend in Auckland who entered through the skilled migrant category. And it took her two years, in a job she did not particularly like. Before something came along.

So in my experience of emigrating to NZ is. It may take a couple of years to get sorted. And there will be hard times when you want to be back home in your comfort zone with your mates. But be pro-active. Actually make part of your budget to get out to social events, invite the neighbours around for a BBQ, join clubs, start a part time college course indeed start any course so you can meet the locals and make friends. Because they are the ones who will help make the whole NZ experience a pleasure. As SarahB experienced taking the horse out and meeting other riders

Just dont give up !!

Now I have prattled on long enough, Its turning into another beautiful day here. And I need to be out in the fresh 'high country' mountain air to clear my sore head

Chris
Pomki is offline  
Old Oct 19th 2005, 11:53 pm
  #13  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: Bay of Plenty, NZ
Posts: 191
Herm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant future
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by Pomki
I hope this will make sense.
Last night we had our monthly meeting in the fire brigade, which lasts for an hour or two. But for some reason I always feel hungover in the morning after these....

SarahB it sounds great up there. You have given me the idea to hook up with one of the farmers here and have a go at this horse riding lark. I have have never done it before, but have heard about some people who will take you on the horses for several days and camp out under the stars. That sounds awesome!


In answer to Janes question
As far as my arriving in NZ. I was very lucky. I was eligible under the dissent category, as my granddad was born here.
This allowed my dad to apply for his passport, and through my dad I got mine. Although If I had kids born in the UK they would not have been eligible, yet Kids now born in NZ can apply for a British passport the other way around.
I took the first ropey job I was offered in Chch for rubbish wages when I arrived. And only came across this job through word of mouth. I was asked to take it. There are plenty of opportunities for jobs especially in the hospitality trade around the country, as the tourist trade is a major income to the country. And in small towns like this, it is often hard to find a decent workforce. This is because everyone wants to go to the big cities. Which is why I tell all my incoming staff, this is the place to save loads of money. Because unless you are in the pub getting bo!!oxed every night, you are not wasting it. And it does not cost a fortune to live. When I lived in CHC I drove everywhere. Whereas here there is no need. It take about two minutes on the bike to cover the town The car is there if I just need to head to the big shops.

The one thing I have found about kiwis, is they are sooooo damn helpful. As long as you get out, meet them and make friends, they often know someone or something that can be of help.
When I first moved to NZ, I pitched up at the house I was renting, with nothing but a suit case. And within 24 hrs, all the neighbours were round with furniture, a TV, beds, crockery etc... I love telling people back home about these instances that have happened to me since being here.

So anyway, I am waffling off subject (a common trait with me)
I had never heard of Omarama, and to be honest most of the tourists that go through, see a shop and a pub and think, thats it. Nothing here. But I only found out what this spot has to offer, because i committed myself to the place and spent a month getting out meeting people, and being told about these things. I was lucky it did not take that long to come across this job and place. And it was purely through my friends I am here, otherwise i may still be in a dead end job in Chch, earning just enough to pay the bills and buy 3 pints at the local on a Friday night.
I have a friend in Auckland who entered through the skilled migrant category. And it took her two years, in a job she did not particularly like. Before something came along.

So in my experience of emigrating to NZ is. It may take a couple of years to get sorted. And there will be hard times when you want to be back home in your comfort zone with your mates. But be pro-active. Actually make part of your budget to get out to social events, invite the neighbours around for a BBQ, join clubs, start a part time college course indeed start any course so you can meet the locals and make friends. Because they are the ones who will help make the whole NZ experience a pleasure. As SarahB experienced taking the horse out and meeting other riders

Just dont give up !!

Now I have prattled on long enough, Its turning into another beautiful day here. And I need to be out in the fresh 'high country' mountain air to clear my sore head

Chris

Lucky you - I obviously picked the wrong Island - its absolutely pis**ng down here.
Herm is offline  
Old Oct 20th 2005, 12:03 am
  #14  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Pomki is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by Herm
Lucky you - I obviously picked the wrong Island - its absolutely pis**ng down here.

Haha, yes I have been watching how all the micro climates work in NZ. One being the further north you go teh more tropical. So the warmer and more constantly wet.
Here we get horrificaly cold winter nights. (plenty of wood on the fire) But by day. All the rain is dumped on the West coast, and the Alps. And there is none left when it gets to us

I had an absurd weather day recently. At home it was a beautiful clear day. I drove for 5 mins and into torrential rain. This lasted for about 5 km and then come out to beautiful clear skys again on the other side!
Pomki is offline  
Old Oct 20th 2005, 12:19 am
  #15  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: Bay of Plenty, NZ
Posts: 191
Herm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant futureHerm has a brilliant future
Default Re: Life in NZ

Originally Posted by Pomki
Haha, yes I have been watching how all the micro climates work in NZ. One being the further north you go teh more tropical. So the warmer and more constantly wet.
Here we get horrificaly cold winter nights. (plenty of wood on the fire) But by day. All the rain is dumped on the West coast, and the Alps. And there is none left when it gets to us

I had an absurd weather day recently. At home it was a beautiful clear day. I drove for 5 mins and into torrential rain. This lasted for about 5 km and then come out to beautiful clear skys again on the other side!

Well up here we are looking forward to our 7th wet weekend in a row. We don't get cold nights - the occasional frost but not really cold - but we do get wet springs. I knew it was green for a reason !!!!! Your right though the weather can change very quickly - We are 5 km from the beach - it can rain all day at home yet the beach will be bathed in sunshine.

On the other hand my son is down in Dunedin - cold I thought, wet I thought - but no - he says it never rains and does not get that cold. Another micro climate??
Herm is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.