British Expats

British Expats (https://britishexpats.com/forum/)
-   New Zealand (https://britishexpats.com/forum/new-zealand-83/)
-   -   Emigrating to NZ (https://britishexpats.com/forum/new-zealand-83/emigrating-nz-935079/)

Peter and Steph Sep 30th 2020 9:51 am

Emigrating to NZ
 
Hi all,
Me and my fiancée have finally, after years of consideration and research decided to start looking into emigrating to beautiful New Zealand from the north of England with our young family.
I myself work in construction and my fiancée is a civil servant, we have 2 daughters, one 2 years old and one 6 years old.
We really love Nelson, we have researched numerous destinations etc in NZ to locate to but Nelson always seems to draw us and our young family in.
At this point we have no idea where to start, who to speak to and what process or avenue to take next. That being said we would really appreciate any advice from people that have done the same and know the best route to take and start the process.
Many thanks

BEVS Oct 1st 2020 5:20 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12916251)
Hi all,
Me and my fiancée have finally, after years of consideration and research decided to start looking into emigrating to beautiful New Zealand from the north of England with our young family.
I myself work in construction and my fiancée is a civil servant, we have 2 daughters, one 2 years old and one 6 years old.
We really love Nelson, we have researched numerous destinations etc in NZ to locate to but Nelson always seems to draw us and our young family in.
At this point we have no idea where to start, who to speak to and what process or avenue to take next. That being said we would really appreciate any advice from people that have done the same and know the best route to take and start the process.
Many thanks

Before anything , first and foremost , is what immigration policy you would utilise to uplift a visa & from there can you actually be granted the visa to enter and live in the country.

I have lived in the Nelson area for 16 years now.

Have you ever been to New Zealand?

Peter and Steph Oct 1st 2020 6:53 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by BEVS (Post 12916642)
Before anything , first and foremost , is what immigration policy you would utilise to uplift a visa & from there can you actually be granted the visa to enter and live in the country.

I have lived in the Nelson area for 16 years now.

Have you ever been to New Zealand?

Thank you for your reply,
We haven't been to NZ no, we have family that have been there, and a family friend from Christchurch. We are getting married next summer so visiting isn't really a option at this point for us but this isn't something we have rushed into and naively think it is going to be a happy ever after. We understand that it will be a hard. We have been researching areas, work, schools etc alot over the last 6 months but have been speaking about it for the last few years. We have spoken to family friends that have emigrated to and live in Aus and Canada about the experience, pros and cons etc and all have said to join a forum and ask the people that have done the same but actually in NZ, so here we are.
We really don't know what policy to pursue. We both would be looking for work full-time. I am a time served data cable engineer, I have been for the last 19 years, I also hold qualifications in personal training. My fiancee is currently an administrative office finance manager at a large prison.
We are in the process of getting in touch with job agencies in NZ. My fiancee actually saw a job last night that is exactly what she does and would suit her perfectly.
We both earn £30000 each a year plus bonuses and overtime.
That being said we are not in no massive rush as we want to do this correctly and find the best option for us as a family as this whole process and our main reason for doing this is to give our little girls the best start in life.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks again for your reply

SanDiegogirl Oct 1st 2020 3:41 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
The following website will help:

https://www.immigration.govt.nz/

https://www.newzealandnow.govt.nz/mo...-migrant-visas

https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-...ve-permanently

As said, you need to qualify for a visa.

Peter and Steph Oct 1st 2020 4:32 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
Thank you, we will check these out. Fingers crossed

Justcol Oct 1st 2020 8:46 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
Initially, go wherever you can secure a job, then make plans to move to Nelson further down the line.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 9:58 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Justcol (Post 12916984)
Initially, go wherever you can secure a job, then make plans to move to Nelson further down the line.

Thats something we have spoken about. Nelson is our preferred location but we are more than happy to try anywhere in NZ.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 10:04 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
We checked if we would have enough points on the visa links above and I would. I have a diploma in health and fitness (personal training) which would give us the points required. Over the weekend we will get in touch with some job sites and send our information over and ask what options and actions we would be able to take next.

Moses2013 Oct 2nd 2020 10:27 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917226)
Thats something we have spoken about. Nelson is our preferred location but we are more than happy to try anywhere in NZ.

While I agree that the first step would be to go where work is, most people in the UK would not be more than happy to go anywhere in the UK. Unfortunately we can't all pick our preferred location but what are the reasons for a move? I suspect you picked Nelson because of weather but would you be happy in Invercargill just because it's NZ? If you are tied to a location because of visas or never have enough cash to afford a decent life in Nelson, would the move be a success?

leroyS Oct 2nd 2020 10:53 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12916251)
Hi all,
Me and my fiancée have finally, after years of consideration and research decided to start looking into emigrating to beautiful New Zealand from the north of England with our young family.
I myself work in construction and my fiancée is a civil servant, we have 2 daughters, one 2 years old and one 6 years old.
We really love Nelson, we have researched numerous destinations etc in NZ to locate to but Nelson always seems to draw us and our young family in.
At this point we have no idea where to start, who to speak to and what process or avenue to take next. That being said we would really appreciate any advice from people that have done the same and know the best route to take and start the process.
Many thanks

you'll miss British banter and pub culture when you move. But on the flip side, you will get sun, palm trees, beach, scenery and a far more laid back lifestyle. Be prepared for lower quality standards in your work place. Eye opening lower quality.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 11:00 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Moses2013 (Post 12917243)
While I agree that the first step would be to go where work is, most people in the UK would not be more than happy to go anywhere in the UK. Unfortunately we can't all pick our preferred location but what are the reasons for a move? I suspect you picked Nelson because of weather but would you be happy in Invercargill just because it's NZ? If you are tied to a location because of visas or never have enough cash to afford a decent life in Nelson, would the move be a success?

Our reasons for the move are because we want the best possible life for our children. Education is a massive reason for the move, we want our girls to have the best opportunities in life. Coming from the north of England we are used to unpredictable weather, rain, etc. We didn't chose Nelson because of the weather, it was because of education, art, all the opportunities it could bring to our girls.
We are not naive enough to know that life will have its challenges, weather, rain etc, sometimes loneliness, missing family, new cultures. It will be hard at times but we haven't made this decision on a whim, the opportunities just aren't here in the UK anymore, crime is at a all time high, further education is extortionate in price and not guaranteed. Unfortunately it just isn't the same UK as when I grew up. After speaking with someone working over here who is from Christchurch about various things, and alot of research we think NZ would provide a upbringing, and values that we want for our girls.
We want to give this a serious go, we have spoke. About this for a number of years and think now would be the best time to pursue it whilst our girls are still young and will do everything to make things work when (and if) we get over there.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 11:03 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by leroyS (Post 12917255)
you'll miss British banter and pub culture when you move. But on the flip side, you will get sun, palm trees, beach, scenery and a far more laid back lifestyle. Be prepared for lower quality standards in your work place. Eye opening lower quality.

To be honest I don't drink much, maybe a handful of times a year. Although I know iyl miss the boys (rugby lads) we are hoping to embrace the culture and People and try to make new friends.
The laid-back lifestyle sounds just up my way tho. Ha

leroyS Oct 2nd 2020 11:10 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917264)
To be honest I don't drink much, maybe a handful of times a year. Although I know iyl miss the boys (rugby lads) we are hoping to embrace the culture and People and try to make new friends.
The laid-back lifestyle sounds just up my way tho. Ha

NZ is so laid back you will be horizontal m8. Especially Nelson. Plenty of nice wineries up there, sunny all year round too. Bit of a winter but it is amplified by the lower quality NZ housing. There's a few decent pubs there. Not the same as British pubs, but it's ok. Nelson has good access to Abel Tasman, Marlborough Sounds, Motueka, Nelson Lakes....All breathtaking scenery.

You'll miss typical "britishisms" that you never even knew you had, but that's a given considering you're from the UK obviously.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 11:22 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by leroyS (Post 12917267)
NZ is so laid back you will be horizontal m8. Especially Nelson. Plenty of nice wineries up there, sunny all year round too. Bit of a winter but it is amplified by the lower quality NZ housing. There's a few decent pubs there. Not the same as British pubs, but it's ok. Nelson has good access to Abel Tasman, Marlborough Sounds, Motueka, Nelson Lakes....All breathtaking scenery.

You'll miss typical "britishisms" that you never even knew you had, but that's a given considering you're from the UK obviously.

Sounds amazing, we love the seasons, a good winter, nice summer etc, and we are a outdoors family that love nature, walks, bikes etc, and I'm just getting girls into camping, I'm like a big kid.ha
I know we will miss alot, I come from a very very close nit northern town, but like I say it just isn't the same anymore, the social scene etc has gone. To be honest we really want to embrace the NZ way of life, the culture, morals etc.

Moses2013 Oct 2nd 2020 11:45 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917261)
Our reasons for the move are because we want the best possible life for our children. Education is a massive reason for the move, we want our girls to have the best opportunities in life. Coming from the north of England we are used to unpredictable weather, rain, etc. We didn't chose Nelson because of the weather, it was because of education, art, all the opportunities it could bring to our girls.
We are not naive enough to know that life will have its challenges, weather, rain etc, sometimes loneliness, missing family, new cultures. It will be hard at times but we haven't made this decision on a whim, the opportunities just aren't here in the UK anymore, crime is at a all time high, further education is extortionate in price and not guaranteed. Unfortunately it just isn't the same UK as when I grew up. After speaking with someone working over here who is from Christchurch about various things, and alot of research we think NZ would provide a upbringing, and values that we want for our girls.
We want to give this a serious go, we have spoke. About this for a number of years and think now would be the best time to pursue it whilst our girls are still young and will do everything to make things work when (and if) we get over there.

Not saying you are naive but it's always the location within the country rather than the country itself. I can understand why people would want to leave the UK and eventually ended up in Ireland myself and feel a lot safer here than in the UK but it's mainly also the location. Many places in the Western world will have education, opportunities and art but you still have poverty and people who fail. Even in Christchurch you have crime and drugs and my cousin also had friends in Christchurch who had to rebuild most of their home after the earthquake and are financially ruined. Values I don't know and most kids like their smartphones these days and parents are the same. I also have a work colleague who thought NZ was laid back 20 years ago but eventually returned from Dunedin and talks about how it's changed. Everybody has an opinion but my point was that you should focus on where in NZ you can find the things you are missing now but please don't be so desperate that you will go anywhere (This often leads to failure). We also spend a lot of time in Spain and luckily can afford a small place there but sunshine, outdoor living and good schooling is worthless if you are broke at the end of the month (Life is life). Good luck anyway

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 11:54 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Moses2013 (Post 12917293)
Not saying you are naive but it's always the location within the country rather than the country itself. I can understand why people would want to leave the UK and eventually ended up in Ireland myself and feel a lot safer here than in the UK but it's mainly also the location. Many places in the Western world will have education, opportunities and art but you still have poverty and people who fail. Even in Christchurch you have crime and drugs and my cousin also had friends in Christchurch who had to rebuild most of their home after the earthquake and are financially ruined. Values I don't know and most kids like their smartphones these days and parents are the same. I also have a work colleague who thought NZ was laid back 20 years ago but eventually returned from Dunedin and talks about how it's changed. Everybody has an opinion but my point was that you should focus on where in NZ you can find the things you are missing now but please don't be so desperate that you will go anywhere (This often leads to failure).

I appreciate what your saying completely. I would always look at the crime rates, poverty, employment rates etc and if they wasn't able to provide that secure environment for my family then I wouldn't go. I am not saying that I would just mover to NZ to get it, I want to move to better mine and my family's life, not just relocate and still have the same problems as at home, that would be foolish. I know that my kids could fail in life, that I could fail also, but I want to relocate to give us the best possible opportunity to succeed in a safer environment with more and happier way of life. If somewhere isn't what we want and could possibly be a risk then not a chance I would put my family in any sort of danger, on the other hand tho if I can find somewhere that my family can live a slower, relaxed, happier life then I would move heaven and earth to provide that for them.
The values and culture of the majority of people in NZ is one of the main reasons why we would love to move to their beautiful country, to embrace it, and to give it our all to make it work for us.

christmasoompa Oct 2nd 2020 12:18 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917301)
I appreciate what your saying completely. I would always look at the crime rates, poverty, employment rates etc and if they wasn't able to provide that secure environment for my family then I wouldn't go. I am not saying that I would just mover to NZ to get it, I want to move to better mine and my family's life, not just relocate and still have the same problems as at home, that would be foolish. I know that my kids could fail in life, that I could fail also, but I want to relocate to give us the best possible opportunity to succeed in a safer environment with more and happier way of life. If somewhere isn't what we want and could possibly be a risk then not a chance I would put my family in any sort of danger, on the other hand tho if I can find somewhere that my family can live a slower, relaxed, happier life then I would move heaven and earth to provide that for them.

Can't blame you for any of that, but (just playing devil's advocate), would a move within the UK to a nicer/safer/better education area not achieve the same thing? Plus save you tens of thousands of pounds! Just a thought anyway.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 12:33 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by christmasoompa (Post 12917319)
Can't blame you for any of that, but (just playing devil's advocate), would a move within the UK to a nicer/safer/better education area not achieve the same thing? Plus save you tens of thousands of pounds! Just a thought anyway.

That is something we spoke about, and was definitely an option, but like I've said in previous messages we have had a really good think about all our options over the last few years but we always come back to NZ, to the life over there. We could relocate in the UK, I have family in Wales and Scotland that would help but still the same problems follow as it's all under the same umbrella, government, educational boards, lifestyle.
All the above in NZ we as a family think would suit us better and it is something we would want for our children's future. Thank you for your input and appreciate what you are saying and your feedback.

Justcol Oct 2nd 2020 12:33 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
If you are happy you won't miss anything.
The only thing I missed was going for a pint with our kid, but reality was, that was something we rarely did. I found a pub down here that sold boddingtons and I used to go in there once a week with a couple of English mates and talk shit for a couple of hours, it soon stopped the pining for home.
I have friends in Nelson. They moved there from Auckland with their two young girls, for similar reasons you have given, and now 4 years later they are disillusioned and looking to leave. I personally don't like the place, it leaves me very underwhelmed when I've visited. I prefer Blenheim or even Motueka. Visually it's nice, the climate is good and it's handy for Wellington. Of course you may love the place for the same reasons I dont.
Ignore the profits of doom, come with an open mind and be prepared for surprises, disappointments and both the highs and the lows. NZ is a great place live and raise kids, good luck with your plans 👍

Pulaski Oct 2nd 2020 2:52 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917261)
Our reasons for the move are because we want the best possible life for our children. Education is a massive reason for the move, we want our girls to have the best opportunities in life. .....


Originally Posted by Moses2013 (Post 12917293)
Not saying you are naive but it's always the location within the country rather than the country itself. I can understand why people would want to leave the UK and eventually ended up in Ireland myself and feel a lot safer here than in the UK but it's mainly also the location. ....

I agree with Moses, and I am not sure that your "we want the best possible life for our children" stands up to scrutiny. :unsure: .... Be aware that objectively you are considering a move to the remotest edge of the western/ industrialized world, over 1,000 miles from the nearest other country (Australia), which itself is remote from other similar economies. There are good reasons why many New Zealanders live in Australia, and many others come to the UK - it is for the educational and employment opportunities that they can't find in New Zealand.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 3:10 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Pulaski (Post 12917442)
I agree with Moses, and I am not sure that your "we want the best possible life for our children" stands up to scrutiny. :unsure: .... Be aware that objectively you are considering a move to the remotest edge of the western/ industrialized world, over 1,000 miles from the nearest other country (Australia), which itself is remote from other similar economies. There are good reasons why many New Zealanders live in Australia, and many others come to the UK - it is for the educational and employment opportunities that they can't find in New Zealand.

I appreciate your opinion like everyone else's and I 100% take and welcome the advice but I am aware of how remote it is, I'm aware of how far away from the UK it is, but stating that people from NZ go to Aus for opportunities in work and education, whilst may be true, isn't anything I'm concerned with, as I know many people from the UK that have also gone over and emigrated to Aus for the same reason.
There are stories of people wanting to emigrate for various reasons, there are good stories, there are bad stories, some stay and some go. But each family adapts differently. We have made the decision to emigrate to NZ for more than one reason that seems to be missed in all this, at 34 years of age I'm totally aware of the risks, but at the same time I'm totally aware of the possible rewards. We have family in Aus, they said they would definitely prefer to have moved to NZ if they could of done it again but are to old. We have a friend of a friend that has lived in NZ for the past 15 years and say it is so much better than the life they lived in UK, with their qualifications they found more opportunities and they wouldn't ever think of returning. Apparently they love it and love the people and their kids love it. Thanks again

Moses2013 Oct 2nd 2020 3:34 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917459)
We have a friend of a friend that has lived in NZ for the past 15 years and say it is so much better than the life they lived in UK, with their qualifications they found more opportunities and they wouldn't ever think of returning. Apparently they love it and love the people and their kids love it. Thanks again

Don't forget that is was 15 years ago and it was a lot easier back then. It's all about timing and I remember the crowds who used to flock to Canada and Australia for higher paid jobs and many are now settled but those who moved in recent years struggle with the current house prices and wages on offer. I always say it but those who have never been to NZ or experienced remote living should try spending a few weeks holiday in remote places closer to home (North of Spain, Azores, Achill etc.) to really get a feeling if it's for them. Better, go to New Zealand before moving the whole family.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 4:31 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Moses2013 (Post 12917472)
Don't forget that is was 15 years ago and it was a lot easier back then. It's all about timing and I remember the crowds who used to flock to Canada and Australia for higher paid jobs and many are now settled but those who moved in recent years struggle with the current house prices and wages on offer. I always say it but those who have never been to NZ or experienced remote living should try spending a few weeks holiday in remote places closer to home (North of Spain, Azores, Achill etc.) to really get a feeling if it's for them. Better, go to New Zealand before moving the whole family.

Ive holidayed in many remote places. From the north of Scotland, southern Ireland, to North France, southern France etc. I fished the lakes of Scotland for weeks on end, this was camping lakeside, not much signal if any and very little interaction with locals. I also worked in the Shetland Islands for 4 months, that was extremely remote as for a whole month we had no way of leaving the Island due to the terrible weather and storms meaning no ferries or flights out.
All the points you have made we have taken into consideration. We are not a city living family, we live in a small northern town, we holiday in the countryside, we certainly are not a materialistic family. We know there are alot of factors to take in but we also know the risks, but yet again we are going to take the rough with the smooth and try to make the most of the experience and throw ourselves straight into island life. I've just spoken to my partner and she has just informed me that the couple that live in NZ told the people we know to move over as they would love it. They said it is so much better for their kids. So although you are pointing out the negatives, which we know exist, we are also hearing from the other side and the positive stories of people that have emigrated and love it, and say still it is a fantastic place and they would recommend it.

SanDiegogirl Oct 2nd 2020 4:49 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917516)
Ive holidayed in many remote places. From the north of Scotland, southern Ireland, to North France, southern France etc. I fished the lakes of Scotland for weeks on end, this was camping lakeside, not much signal if any and very little interaction with locals. I also worked in the Shetland Islands for 4 months, that was extremely remote as for a whole month we had no way of leaving the Island due to the terrible weather and storms meaning no ferries or flights out.

There is no-where 'remote' on the European mainland or the UK that could compare to being 1,000 miles away from your nearest large land mass and knowing that to fly to the UK takes on average around 24 hours.

However, good luck to you - I moved to the US at age 50 (huge change) - if you go with the intention of making a real go of it, are not so family orientated that not seeing mum/dad/sister/brother etc for months/years at a time will depress you, you'll be a success.

Take a look at some of the threads on this NZ forum..... several there about settling in NZ and various aspects of the move.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 5:08 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by SanDiegogirl (Post 12917527)
There is no-where 'remote' on the European mainland or the UK that could compare to being 1,000 miles away from your nearest large land mass and knowing that to fly to the UK takes on average around 24 hours.

However, good luck to you - I moved to the US at age 50 (huge change) - if you go with the intention of making a real go of it, are not so family orientated that not seeing mum/dad/sister/brother etc for months/years at a time will depress you, you'll be a success.

Take a look at some of the threads on this NZ forum..... several there about settling in NZ and various aspects of the move.

I know what your saying and understand it will be a massive change, it's literally uping and changing our whole life, but we are, if successful in the process, going to give it our absolute all and make it a success. Were made of tough things up north as they say. Ha
Thank you for you reply and message of luck

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 5:14 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Justcol (Post 12917327)
If you are happy you won't miss anything.
The only thing I missed was going for a pint with our kid, but reality was, that was something we rarely did. I found a pub down here that sold boddingtons and I used to go in there once a week with a couple of English mates and talk shit for a couple of hours, it soon stopped the pining for home.
I have friends in Nelson. They moved there from Auckland with their two young girls, for similar reasons you have given, and now 4 years later they are disillusioned and looking to leave. I personally don't like the place, it leaves me very underwhelmed when I've visited. I prefer Blenheim or even Motueka. Visually it's nice, the climate is good and it's handy for Wellington. Of course you may love the place for the same reasons I dont.
Ignore the profits of doom, come with an open mind and be prepared for surprises, disappointments and both the highs and the lows. NZ is a great place live and raise kids, good luck with your plans 👍

Nice one mate, it's good to hear a more positive response ha. We are determined to give it a go if successful with the visa and even with the negative stuff that people said may happen or is the case, we still think from the positives and the life we live now in UK we are more suited to life in NZ and want to look further into work and locations, that's one of the reasons we have come on here for advice about the best places to find work, places to raise kids etc, although we love the look of Nelson we are open and if somewhere else suits us and our girls more and we had opportunity of work then we certainly would consider it. Thanks again

Moses2013 Oct 2nd 2020 5:50 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917545)
Nice one mate, it's good to hear a more positive response ha. We are determined to give it a go if successful with the visa and even with the negative stuff that people said may happen or is the case, we still think from the positives and the life we live now in UK we are more suited to life in NZ and want to look further into work and locations, that's one of the reasons we have come on here for advice about the best places to find work, places to raise kids etc, although we love the look of Nelson we are open and if somewhere else suits us and our girls more and we had opportunity of work then we certainly would consider it. Thanks again

Don't want to sound negative but just realistic and seen it all. Especially if it doesn't work out with visa maybe look at options closer to home. You often see people focused on one country who then end up depressed because it didn't work out with visa. I was also once focused on Abaco and nearly bought land there. Just glad I didn't and now appreciate the life we have in Europe a lot more.

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 5:57 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Moses2013 (Post 12917566)
Don't want to sound negative but just realistic and seen it all. Especially if it doesn't work out with visa maybe look at options closer to home. You often see people focused on one country who then end up depressed because it didn't work out with visa. I was also once focused on Abaco and nearly bought land there. Just glad I didn't and now appreciate the life we have in Europe a lot more.

No probs, like I say we appreciate all responses and take it all into consideration. We have looked into Aus, also looked into Canada, Wales and even the south of France. After weighing them all up and looking what we want for ourselves and our family we really believe NZ is something we would like to pursue and see where we end up. At this stage we certainly haven't thrown all our eggs into one basket as like you say we may not be successful with the visa application, until then we are still just looking for advice on various locations in NZ, how to find and apply for work etc. Until we get a answer on the visa we aren't going to get to invested that it leaves us devastated if it isn't successful.

hallie_day Oct 2nd 2020 10:25 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
I am with Moses on this.
As you may have seen from previous posts I am slightly down on all things NZ, but one thing that I am objective about is education, and with my daughter about to change schools, I am currently obsessed! Sorry for my long and anecdotal post, but something that shocked me.

We live on the North Shore (Auckland) so different to where you are looking (but still remote and quiet for a Londoner!) and the area has a great reputation for schools so we thought we couldn't go wrong whichever suburb we lived in. The area is very privileged and our children go to a decile 10 school. On paper all well and good.

But the reality is quite scary. Schools are not obliged to follow the curriculum but can pick and choose as they see fit and there is a MASSIVE discrepancy between teachers. It seems there is little monitoring. Initially I was happy as my daughter's teacher (she is now in year 6) was trained in Chester, the same college as my mum in the UK. But it turns out he doesn't really teach. They do an hour of fitness in the morning, and an hour of PE in the afternoon. In maths he gives out worksheets but little instruction but it's ok, the clever kid on her table explains it. A lot of their work is project based but it doesn't get marked and they don't get feedback so I see little value in this. She has been doing a project on 'The day of the dead' for months. Despite losing so much time this year she is rehearsing the school play for 3 days a week as this is deemed more important than academic work. Year 6 is seen as a celebration of completing primary school before they go to intermediate, where they do very little for the next two years. Parents I know with children at our local intermediate describe it as a 'holiday camp'.

I have a friend who is the principal of one of the best intermediates in the area, and she admits that it would be almost impossible for children to slot back into the UK system easily.

My son in year 3 and I am good friends with one of his friend's mum. She was concerned about his maths as he couldn't do tasks his younger brother found easy. She pressed school for info but was told he was was fine, average with no issues. Still not happy she asked how he was assessed and could she see some of his results. It took a while for a response but she was told no, they work online and it's difficult to get data! He started tutoring a couple of weeks ago and within half an hour the tutor fed back that he can't add or subtract at the age of 8.

This is a well regarded school, popular with Chinese families (relevant because their strong emphasis on education is almost a cliché here) but it turns out that almost all the Chinese families rely on extra tuition from year 3 onwards.

We can't really afford it, but I am now desperately trying to get my daughter a place at a private school that teaches the Cambridge curriculum. As the daughter of a teacher, the product of an English grammar school and someone who likes to live quite frugally, I am against the private school system, but I am also aware my children will need to compete in an ever competitive global world (and I want to go home!).







Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 10:39 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by hallie_day (Post 12917721)
I am with Moses on this.
As you may have seen from previous posts I am slightly down on all things NZ, but one thing that I am objective about is education, and with my daughter about to change schools, I am currently obsessed! Sorry for my long and anecdotal post, but something that shocked me.

We live on the North Shore (Auckland) so different to where you are looking (but still remote and quiet for a Londoner!) and the area has a great reputation for schools so we thought we couldn't go wrong whichever suburb we lived in. The area is very privileged and our children go to a decile 10 school. On paper all well and good.

But the reality is quite scary. Schools are not obliged to follow the curriculum but can pick and choose as they see fit and there is a MASSIVE discrepancy between teachers. It seems there is little monitoring. Initially I was happy as my daughter's teacher (she is now in year 6) was trained in Chester, the same college as my mum in the UK. But it turns out he doesn't really teach. They do an hour of fitness in the morning, and an hour of PE in the afternoon. In maths he gives out worksheets but little instruction but it's ok, the clever kid on her table explains it. A lot of their work is project based but it doesn't get marked and they don't get feedback so I see little value in this. She has been doing a project on 'The day of the dead' for months. Despite losing so much time this year she is rehearsing the school play for 3 days a week as this is deemed more important than academic work. Year 6 is seen as a celebration of completing primary school before they go to intermediate, where they do very little for the next two years. Parents I know with children at our local intermediate describe it as a 'holiday camp'.

I have a friend who is the principal of one of the best intermediates in the area, and she admits that it would be almost impossible for children to slot back into the UK system easily.

My son in year 3 and I am good friends with one of his friend's mum. She was concerned about his maths as he couldn't do tasks his younger brother found easy. She pressed school for info but was told he was was fine, average with no issues. Still not happy she asked how he was assessed and could she see some of his results. It took a while for a response but she was told no, they work online and it's difficult to get data! He started tutoring a couple of weeks ago and within half an hour the tutor fed back that he can't add or subtract at the age of 8.

This is a well regarded school, popular with Chinese families (relevant because their strong emphasis on education is almost a cliché here) but it turns out that almost all the Chinese families rely on extra tuition from year 3 onwards.

We can't really afford it, but I am now desperately trying to get my daughter a place at a private school that teaches the Cambridge curriculum. As the daughter of a teacher, the product of an English grammar school and someone who likes to live quite frugally, I am against the private school system, but I am also aware my children will need to compete in an ever competitive global world (and I want to go home!).

I am really sorry to hear of your situation, what you are describing is awful and is the last thing you want as a parent for your children and I hope and pray that you get the outcome that you want in all this and you can get yourselves back home.
But like many things in life there are positives aswell. Having just spoken with the friend we have that has family in NZ earlier, they have told us that their children are flourishing at school, and there eldest has excelled. That they find the class sizes alot smaller than here and that there children are getting alot more time with the teachers.
Again I am really sorry for your situation and really feel for you, it is something that we will seriously look into and see if there anymore cases similar to them of yours.
Thank you and good luck

hallie_day Oct 2nd 2020 10:54 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
Thank you.

I think your friend's experience illustrates the problem - the lack of consistency.
Coming from a country where every school teaches the national curriculum and teachers are monitored regularly, I didn't think there would be a need to dig deeper than the ERO report (OFSTED equivalent) but our experience of the school and the report bear little resemblance to each other.
It's not even that I agree entirely with the system at home - I think too much pressure is put on kids academically - but it feels the pendulum here has swung too far the other way and academic work is not important until 13/14.

My kids do appear to be flourishing, excellent reports and parent's evening feedback, lots of friends, love school (apart from my daughter experiencing some bullying), on all the sports teams.... It's the things that 7 and 11 year olds do not care about that worry me!!

Peter and Steph Oct 2nd 2020 11:07 pm

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by hallie_day (Post 12917736)
Thank you.

I think your friend's experience illustrates the problem - the lack of consistency.
Coming from a country where every school teaches the national curriculum and teachers are monitored regularly, I didn't think there would be a need to dig deeper than the ERO report (OFSTED equivalent) but our experience of the school and the report bear little resemblance to each other.
It's not even that I agree entirely with the system at home - I think too much pressure is put on kids academically - but it feels the pendulum here has swung too far the other way and academic work is not important until 13/14.

My kids do appear to be flourishing, excellent reports and parent's evening feedback, lots of friends, love school (apart from my daughter experiencing some bullying), on all the sports teams.... It's the things that 7 and 11 year olds do not care about that worry me!!

I agree with you that consistency definitely is very important, but I have experienced just how terrible the education system has gotten here in the UK. So many kids are not getting into the high schools of there choice, not even in their 3 options as they are extremely over attended. This has seen kids with so much potential in primary school, then not get into the school they wanted and end up at a much less desirable school and totally fall off and struggle, rebel and waste a very bright future, or simply just don't reach anywhere near their potential.
if we did get offered a visa and a location we would make sure that we review everything about the schools, from junior to high to further education and if we didn't think they are what we want then.would reconsider our options.

Bo-Jangles Oct 3rd 2020 2:19 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Pulaski (Post 12917442)
I agree with Moses, and I am not sure that your "we want the best possible life for our children" stands up to scrutiny. :unsure: .... Be aware that objectively you are considering a move to the remotest edge of the western/ industrialized world, over 1,000 miles from the nearest other country (Australia), which itself is remote from other similar economies. There are good reasons why many New Zealanders live in Australia, and many others come to the UK - it is for the educational and employment opportunities that they can't find in New Zealand.

I agree wholeheartedly, moving for the sake of the kids future always seems bizarre to me as you never know where the kids will end up and they may not necessarily thank you for dragging them to the other side of the world; unless they're of an age when they don't know any different and likely will adapt to being little Kiwi kids living in a cold house, walking to school with no coat and shoes etc. I find it incredibly hard to countenance there being any particular 'opportunities', 'values' or lifestyle factors for them in Nelson that are not available in the UK or elsewhere. There's plenty of folks been on here over the years whose have kids that have upped sticks and gone back to the UK without their parents as soon as they became old enough to go to university or decide for themselves.

BEVS Oct 3rd 2020 5:08 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
Okays. So everyone is getting ahead of themselves here in several ways. We can all discuss the pros and cons of emigrating v relocation etc and we can all talk about being an NZ immigrant and how it is for us personally, however the fact remains that the very first step is job possibilities and whether or not NZ actually wants a person & their skill...or not. Until then everything else is moot. It is job offer first before a work visa unless someone has enough points without a job offer for a residency visa. As NZ prefers applicants to have work to come to so they can pass the 'settlement' test it is the solid long term permanent job offer that is the golden egg.

I am happy enough to talk about the Nelson and Bays area however the way it will work is that the potential immigrant goes where the work and job offer is and that could be anywhere in NZ


Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12916659)
We really don't know what policy to pursue. We both would be looking for work full-time. I am a time served data cable engineer, I have been for the last 19 years, I also hold qualifications in personal training. My fiancee is currently an administrative office finance manager at a large prison.

Okays. So there is some work to do here to get you both up to speed. With a sound knowledge of immigration visas and procedures you will be better able to look at what a possible NZ future may hold. and where in NZ that may be. As you can see I tend to come at this in a practical way. It works a bit like a monopoly board. You have to start at GO and move through the steps.


We are in the process of getting in touch with job agencies in NZ. My fiancee actually saw a job last night that is exactly what she does and would suit her perfectly.
She may have but that is not how it works for NZ immigration and the Dept of Labour. NZ recruitment agencies however may be able to place one or the other of you properly which will give you the chance to successfully uplift a work visa . That would be a step forward. Any job offered needs to match your work experience and qualifications. An NZ employer is not free to offer an overseas person a job . That yay or nay comes from the Dept of Labour who will also run that by the Dept of Immigration. The exception to this is NZ employers on what is called an Accredited List.

At this moment in time all policies are suspended due to COVID.

I am sure your pals in Xch are very happy and doing well. As you will be more than aware though from the UK that does not translate to all children in NZ are all flourishing and doing well. It does not.

The Nelson and Bays area is fast becoming one long conurbation. The weather is fine enough but it is out on a limb and so can become a bit dull. However for a young family it would do just as well as anywhere else in NZ and also for many places in the UK too..

The occupation "data cable engineer," is on the Construction and Infrastructure list. It is not on the long term shortage list . However if you could find employment with maybe an accredited employer doing that work then it could see you gain an essential skills temp visa. This does not lead to a residency visa however being with an accredited employer could help perhaps. I will leave that there for now.

an administrative office finance manager at a large prison
Qualifications and to what level?

Peter and Steph Oct 3rd 2020 5:18 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Bo-Jangles (Post 12917797)
I agree wholeheartedly, moving for the sake of the kids future always seems bizarre to me as you never know where the kids will end up and they may not necessarily thank you for dragging them to the other side of the world; unless they're of an age when they don't know any different and likely will adapt to being little Kiwi kids living in a cold house, walking to school with no coat and shoes etc. I find it incredibly hard to countenance there being any particular 'opportunities', 'values' or lifestyle factors for them in Nelson that are not available in the UK or elsewhere. There's plenty of folks been on here over the years whose have kids that have upped sticks and gone back to the UK without their parents as soon as they became old enough to go to university or decide for themselves.

My children are 2 and 5, I'm sure they will adapt. I'm almost 100% positive that all children don't walk to school with no shoes on. What I'm finding it hard to understand on here is all the doom and gloom, the worst case scenario, the it won't work attitude. I'm of a responsible age that I can make a decision, along with my fiancee and with the support of my family. We have spoken to a number of people ow who have said that NZ has been amazing for them, that their children have loved it, that have been there for a number of years and couldn't recommend it enough.
I get the feeling that alot of the doom and gloom on here is from people that it hasn't succeeded for and that come from a more wealthy background. I'm from a small working class town in the north of England, we work extremely hard for what we get, we don't have or live in luxury, we are people that just want to succeed in life and better ourselves. I come from a place that has high crime rate, poor education and now love in a country run by idiots.
We asked for some advice on how to get into the country, on what things we could do to help our cause etc. Not on whether we should or not.
Although we appreciate all replies this has become a very blatant attack on all aspects of going to NZ.

Peter and Steph Oct 3rd 2020 5:32 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Bo-Jangles (Post 12917797)
I agree wholeheartedly, moving for the sake of the kids future always seems bizarre to me as you never know where the kids will end up and they may not necessarily thank you for dragging them to the other side of the world; unless they're of an age when they don't know any different and likely will adapt to being little Kiwi kids living in a cold house, walking to school with no coat and shoes etc. I find it incredibly hard to countenance there being any particular 'opportunities', 'values' or lifestyle factors for them in Nelson that are not available in the UK or elsewhere. There's plenty of folks been on here over the years whose have kids that have upped sticks and gone back to the UK without their parents as soon as they became old enough to go to university or decide for themselves.

My children are 2 and 5, I'm sure they will adapt. I'm almost 100% positive that all children don't walk to school with no shoes on. What I'm finding it hard to understand on here is all the doom and gloom, the worst case scenario, the it won't work attitude. I'm of a responsible age that I can make a decision, along with my fiancee and with the support of my family. We have spoken to a number of people ow who have said that NZ has been amazing for them, that their children have loved it, that have been there for a number of years and couldn't recommend it enough.
I get the feeling that alot of the doom and gloom on here is from people that it hasn't succeeded for and that come from a more wealthy background. I'm from a small working class town in the north of England, we work extremely hard for what we get, we don't have or live in luxury, we are people that just want to succeed in life and better ourselves. I come from a place that has high crime rate, poor education and now love in a country run by idiots.
We asked for some advice on how to get into the country, on what things we could do to help our cause etc. Not on whether we should or not.
Although we appreciate all replies this has become a very blatant attack on all aspects of going to NZ.

Peter and Steph Oct 3rd 2020 6:33 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by BEVS (Post 12917849)
Okays. So everyone is getting ahead of themselves here in several ways. We can all discuss the pros and cons of emigrating v relocation etc and we can all talk about being an NZ immigrant and how it is for us personally, however the fact remains that the very first step is job possibilities and whether or not NZ actually wants a person & their skill...or not. Until then everything else is moot. It is job offer first before a work visa unless someone has enough points without a job offer for a residency visa. As NZ prefers applicants to have work to come to so they can pass the 'settlement' test it is the solid long term permanent job offer that is the golden egg.

I am happy enough to talk about the Nelson and Bays area however the way it will work is that the potential immigrant goes where the work and job offer is and that could be anywhere in NZ



Okays. So there is some work to do here to get you both up to speed. With a sound knowledge of immigration visas and procedures you will be better able to look at what a possible NZ future may hold. and where in NZ that may be. As you can see I tend to come at this in a practical way. It works a bit like a monopoly board. You have to start at GO and move through the steps.



She may have but that is not how it works for NZ immigration and the Dept of Labour. NZ recruitment agencies however may be able to place one or the other of you properly which will give you the chance to successfully uplift a work visa . That would be a step forward. Any job offered needs to match your work experience and qualifications. An NZ employer is not free to offer an overseas person a job . That yay or nay comes from the Dept of Labour who will also run that by the Dept of Immigration. The exception to this is NZ employers on what is called an Accredited List.

At this moment in time all policies are suspended due to COVID.

I am sure your pals in Xch are very happy and doing well. As you will be more than aware though from the UK that does not translate to all children in NZ are all flourishing and doing well. It does not.

The Nelson and Bays area is fast becoming one long conurbation. The weather is fine enough but it is out on a limb and so can become a bit dull. However for a young family it would do just as well as anywhere else in NZ and also for many places in the UK too..

The occupation "data cable engineer," is on the Construction and Infrastructure list. It is not on the long term shortage list . However if you could find employment with maybe an accredited employer doing that work then it could see you gain an essential skills temp visa. This does not lead to a residency visa however being with an accredited employer could help perhaps. I will leave that there for now.


Qualifications and to what level?

Thank you so much, this is the type of feedback we was looking for. I'm currently out at the moment but will look into properly and get back. Thank you again

hallie_day Oct 3rd 2020 7:38 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 
I think it's unfair to say that you are just hearing from people who haven't 'succeeded', rather I think it's people who want to dispel some common myths about NZ and warn caution.
I responded because statements like this don't feel accurate:

The values and culture of the majority of people in NZ is one of the main reasons why we would love to move to their beautiful country, to embrace it, and to give it our all to make it work for us.

These are some of the things other than education that have surprised and/or worried me:

NZ has a socialist government who tax food, yet decided in a once in a generation referendum not to tax capital gains (Jacinda is not idolised here in the same way she is abroad!).
It is recognised as a high cost, low wage economy eg. your food bill will be double what it is in the UK.
Bullying is rife at school and in the workplace
I have witnessed more racism here than I did in London
Higher recorded incidences per capita of social problems including poverty, domestic abuse and mental health problems than in the UK (eg. it's well documented that NZ has the highest death rate for teenagers and young people amongst the 19 richest countries because of suicide and road deaths).

I honestly don't want to piss on your parade, but feel that all this is important info that I would have liked to have been told as it balances out the common perception of NZ as some kind of 1950s wholesome utopia.

Pom_Chch Oct 3rd 2020 8:57 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by Peter and Steph (Post 12917853)
What I'm finding it hard to understand on here is all the doom and gloom, the worst case scenario, the it won't work attitude

Welcome to British Expats mate ;)

Peter and Steph Oct 3rd 2020 9:12 am

Re: Emigrating to NZ
 

Originally Posted by hallie_day (Post 12917876)
I think it's unfair to say that you are just hearing from people who haven't 'succeeded', rather I think it's people who want to dispel some common myths about NZ and warn caution.
I responded because statements like this don't feel accurate:

The values and culture of the majority of people in NZ is one of the main reasons why we would love to move to their beautiful country, to embrace it, and to give it our all to make it work for us.

These are some of the things other than education that have surprised and/or worried me:

NZ has a socialist government who tax food, yet decided in a once in a generation referendum not to tax capital gains (Jacinda is not idolised here in the same way she is abroad!).
It is recognised as a high cost, low wage economy eg. your food bill will be double what it is in the UK.
Bullying is rife at school and in the workplace
I have witnessed more racism here than I did in London
Higher recorded incidences per capita of social problems including poverty, domestic abuse and mental health problems than in the UK (eg. it's well documented that NZ has the highest death rate for teenagers and young people amongst the 19 richest countries because of suicide and road deaths).

I honestly don't want to piss on your parade, but feel that all this is important info that I would have liked to have been told as it balances out the common perception of NZ as some kind of 1950s wholesome utopia.

We've already looked online and the UK has a overall higher crime rate that NZ as of September 2020????
Also education success rate etc are higher in NZ than in the UK as of September 2020?????



All times are GMT. The time now is 5:14 pm.

Powered by vBulletin: ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.