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-   Moving back or to the UK (https://britishexpats.com/forum/moving-back-uk-61/)
-   -   Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up (https://britishexpats.com/forum/moving-back-uk-61/over-40s-moving-back-catching-up-701116/)

cheers Jun 4th 2013 3:28 am

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by trottytrue (Post 10739612)
Cheers....Just wanted to wish you a wonderful trip home want to hear all about it when you get back. I could have you eat all the food I miss but you would end up putting on an enormous amout of weight. I think one of the most simple things I enjoyed was having a cup of tea and a toasted teacake....:)

Jasper...we use a debit card and thats it. When you see the amount of money the banks charge when using a credit card it makes me cringe. I would rather do without if I couldnt afford something but unfortunately thats not how many people think, I know some older people that are caught in that trap enjoy today pay later. By the time its paid for its worn out.:frown:

Don't overlook that a lot of people payoff their card each month.
Thanks for your kind wishes. I look forward to all that good stuff.:thumbsup:

J.JsOH Jun 4th 2013 5:26 pm

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by trottytrue (Post 10739612)
Cheers....Just wanted to wish you a wonderful trip home want to hear all about it when you get back. I could have you eat all the food I miss but you would end up putting on an enormous amout of weight. I think one of the most simple things I enjoyed was having a cup of tea and a toasted teacake....:)

Jasper...we use a debit card and thats it. When you see the amount of money the banks charge when using a credit card it makes me cringe. I would rather do without if I couldnt afford something but unfortunately thats not how many people think, I know some older people that are caught in that trap enjoy today pay later. By the time its paid for its worn out.:frown:

Trotty,
I now get some reverse misses of food and it is not things I ate much of in the US cos they were more tasty than healthy.
We are both at home today recovering from chest infection, so for a treat I made, for the first time here, southern gravy, sausage patties and biscuits - well kind of, because my biscuits were really scones without the sugar but not bad for a first try without following a recipe. Not to go all US though, I also made a crumble with rhubarb I picked from the garden.
In US from time to time I made pork pies, just for the fun of an occasional treat.
But as you say, it is the simplest stuff we often miss / enjoy the most - teacake, custard tarts, eccles cakes.

lf1 Jun 4th 2013 8:39 pm

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by J.JsOH (Post 10740570)
Trotty,
I now get some reverse misses of food and it is not things I ate much of in the US cos they were more tasty than healthy.
We are both at home today recovering from chest infection, so for a treat I made, for the first time here, southern gravy, sausage patties and biscuits - well kind of, because my biscuits were really scones without the sugar but not bad for a first try without following a recipe. Not to go all US though, I also made a crumble with rhubarb I picked from the garden.
In US from time to time I made pork pies, just for the fun of an occasional treat.
But as you say, it is the simplest stuff we often miss / enjoy the most - teacake, custard tarts, eccles cakes.

Funny you should mention Rhubarb Crumble. My neighbour gave me some rhubarb, so I was planning to make a crumble today, but as we were out for a run (as in car) we didn't get back until later on and I was just too tired to start baking. I haven't made a Rhubarb Crumble since I was a child, so I don't have high hopes for the results. Hope yours turned out well.:)

Derrygal Jun 4th 2013 11:50 pm

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by lf1 (Post 10740884)
Funny you should mention Rhubarb Crumble. My neighbour gave me some rhubarb, so I was planning to make a crumble today, but as we were out for a run (as in car) we didn't get back until later on and I was just too tired to start baking. I haven't made a Rhubarb Crumble since I was a child, so I don't have high hopes for the results. Hope yours turned out well.:)

My mum used to grow her own rhubarb and she made the most delicious rhubarb pies, crumbles and a lot of other things. She was a great baker - made everything from scratch. She used to spend every Saturday afternoon baking. She's been gone 21 years now - I still miss her. :(

trottytrue Jun 5th 2013 12:57 am

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 
Derrygal..My Mum made the best rhubarb pie. The pastry back then was made from scatch and the best. She also made the best jam roly poly. When she made mince pies and sausage rolls as soon as they came out of the oven my brothers would eat them. She loved to cook. I miss her she been gone 10 years. My Dad grew the rhubarb and mint. When we had lamb Mom would get me to go pick some and chop it up with sugar and then mix it with vinegar.

trottytrue Jun 5th 2013 1:02 am

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 
J.JsOH..Hope your feeling better soon. I loved custard tarts and blackcurrant tarts and Iced buns it is the simple things we tend to miss. I think its the comfort foods. My mum would do rhubard and custard. I am making my mouth water just thinking about it. The restaurant we go in for breakfast does a biscuit with gravy and sausage but I never fancied it.

cheers Jun 5th 2013 3:30 am

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 
OK you lot I want you all to quit buying the custards, neapolitan slices, almond tarts, black currant tarts so there is some left for me when I come home next week.

I was just talking to my friend who is a very active 86 years old and he was telling me a little about his childhood. From 9 years old he worked and bought his own clothes ect. and we both remarked that young people today would be compassionate about our childhood, or his, but they don't know the other side of it. That was a time that children really enjoyed themselves and probably felt more secure. I know we have heard it before but life was simpler back then, we had less but had more. Not that I'm complaining because I think life is pretty good now but life is different.

Cheers

cheers Jun 5th 2013 3:45 am

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 
I might add that I was born before WW2. I remember the excitement of waking up and finding my mother had put us in the Anderson shelter, that was in our garden, during the air raids. Being young I didn't know what they were talking about when they said it was war time. Everything looked normal to me.
My mother sometimes was in tears because she said we had little food. Well I don't know what kind of a childhood she had but for me we had more than enough food. Same way with presents at Christmas. My memory is that we had loads of presents. She didn't see it that way. Again, what kind of a childhood did she have?

One thing I appreciate is that she like a lot of others had four young children to raise on her own because my father was overseas with the war effort.

Thanks Adolph, you screwed up my childhood;)

Cheers

mikelincs Jun 5th 2013 7:00 am

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by cheers (Post 10741358)
I might add that I was born before WW2. I remember the excitement of waking up and finding my mother had put us in the Anderson shelter, that was in our garden, during the air raids. Being young I didn't know what they were talking about when they said it was war time. Everything looked normal to me.
My mother sometimes was in tears because she said we had little food. Well I don't know what kind of a childhood she had but for me we had more than enough food. Same way with presents at Christmas. My memory is that we had loads of presents. She didn't see it that way. Again, what kind of a childhood did she have?

One thing I appreciate is that she like a lot of others had four young children to raise on her own because my father was overseas with the war effort.

Thanks Adolph, you screwed up my childhood;)

Cheers

I think the thing is that people didn't know any different, everyone was hit by the rationing (I wasn't born till 1946), but there wasn't anything like TV etc to advertise all the 'must have' things for children. We all made our own entertainment and were satisfied, there were no electronics, just a radio to listen to.

aries Jun 5th 2013 11:30 am

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by cheers (Post 10741358)
I might add that I was born before WW2. I remember the excitement of waking up and finding my mother had put us in the Anderson shelter, that was in our garden, during the air raids. Being young I didn't know what they were talking about when they said it was war time. Everything looked normal to me.
My mother sometimes was in tears because she said we had little food. Well I don't know what kind of a childhood she had but for me we had more than enough food. Same way with presents at Christmas. My memory is that we had loads of presents. She didn't see it that way. Again, what kind of a childhood did she have?

One thing I appreciate is that she like a lot of others had four young children to raise on her own because my father was overseas with the war effort.

Thanks Adolph, you screwed up my childhood;)

Cheers

I was never excited about the war, but terrified! Plymouth was constantly bombed because of its strategic naval base, and of course Torbay was used for ships to shelter. I will never forget the sirens, the sound of war planes, the thud of bombs, and even seeing the laughing pilot of a low flying plane when he swooped over our local park at tree-top level. He fired at a house four doors away, and went on to kill more than 20 children in another part of town.

The war years impacted on me very badly.

Despite all this, I have had marvellous friendships with German people throughout my life, even knowing a former U-boat commander who was an amazingly jolly man. My best friend is German, and a few minutes ago she chatted with me via Skype from Baden Württemburg.

As for rhubarb crumble, I love it with custard and Devonshire cream. :thumbsup:

J.JsOH Jun 5th 2013 11:39 am

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by lf1 (Post 10740884)
Funny you should mention Rhubarb Crumble. My neighbour gave me some rhubarb, so I was planning to make a crumble today, but as we were out for a run (as in car) we didn't get back until later on and I was just too tired to start baking. I haven't made a Rhubarb Crumble since I was a child, so I don't have high hopes for the results. Hope yours turned out well.:)

It such a forgiving mix of materials that it comes out good everytime, even though maybe a little different.
OH's 1970's cookbook says add 6 oz sugar to 6 oz flour & rub in 3 oz marg. Cover over 1lb fruit, bake 350 F ~ 40 mins until fruit soft and crumble crispy.

My variations - cos I like experimenting and being creative;
Cut down on the sugar to taste and use part white and part brown or demerara.
Substitute porridge oat flakes for half the flour.
Use any fat;(reduce if using oats) marg, butter, spread, whatever, even used sunflower oil.
Tinned strawberries goes well in with rhubarb and use some of the juice for rhubarb sweetener.
Nuke the whole thing in microwave for 8 mins or so gets the fruit and the crumble cooked. It's good just like that or if fancy more crispy top then finish in oven for 10 mins or so.

We have it with instant custard or with ice-cream.

cheers Jun 5th 2013 3:30 pm

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 
So you know.....


"People can feel homesick by moving just a street away," says social psychologist Dr Gary Wood. It's all about how we cope with change, he says.

See more.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22764986

pondhopper2014 Jun 5th 2013 5:01 pm

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 
Love that article, cheers!

J.JsOH Jun 5th 2013 5:19 pm

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by cheers (Post 10742303)
So you know.....


"People can feel homesick by moving just a street away," says social psychologist Dr Gary Wood. It's all about how we cope with change, he says.

See more.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22764986

That's an interesting and pertinent article.

We assume that the home that we miss is the home of origin and roots, but is it? Can another place become home and when we leave that to move back to UK (in most BE cases) can missing our adopted home be a greater strain than the desire for UK?
Just wondering.

J.JsOH Jun 5th 2013 5:29 pm

Re: Over 40's Moving Back and Catching Up
 

Originally Posted by trottytrue (Post 10741212)
J.JsOH..Hope your feeling better soon. I loved custard tarts and blackcurrant tarts and Iced buns it is the simple things we tend to miss. I think its the comfort foods. My mum would do rhubard and custard. I am making my mouth water just thinking about it. The restaurant we go in for breakfast does a biscuit with gravy and sausage but I never fancied it.

When it comes to 'foreign' foods I am all in for the experience. On holidays in India, Japan, China I have not consumed an item of Western food whenever there was a local product available.
Only thing I ever baulked at was canned pig brain found in southern US grocery stores - and even then partly because it is super high cholesterol and I have to avoid such, that was my excuse anyway.

We are on the mend thanks. Had been feeling pleased that we avoided colds and flu for a few months now and then I picked up a bug on the bus or in town last Tuesday (only time I had been in close proximity to other folks for a while) and we have both been laid low by this thing. Living in the suburbs village has been handy because the pharmacy is only couple minutes walk away from home.


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