movin to the uk

Old Jul 10th 2007, 3:03 am
  #1  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3
jaykimball is an unknown quantity at this point
Default movin to the uk

Hi everyone, name's Jason, my wife and I currently live in the US and we are planning on saving up and moving to the UK. She's an accountant/auditor, I'm nearly done getting my teaching degree. We've done quite a bit of research on the UK and have loved pretty much everything we've found out. The culture, way of life, people, and everything else sound like we were just meant to be there. We've been looking at the Manchester area, but have no definite plan of where we want to go. We are planning on selling house/car and saving money for a year and a half to two years, so we have some time, but I feel like we should be prepared as possible since this is obviously a pretty big move. Anything at all that anyone can tell me what we'll need to do and make sure we have and everything would be great. Also, what can we expect pertaining to pretty much everything. We're planning a trip over there sometime in the near future so we'll learn more then, but I just love learning new things about the UK and am very looking forward to life there. Thanks a lot in advance.
jaykimball is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 3:09 am
  #2  
JAJ
Retired
 
JAJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 34,649
JAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: movin to the uk

Originally Posted by jaykimball
Hi everyone, name's Jason, my wife and I currently live in the US and we are planning on saving up and moving to the UK. She's an accountant/auditor, I'm nearly done getting my teaching degree.
Are you both U.S. citizens? If so, you'll need visas/permits to live in the United Kingdom.

Is your wife a CPA?
JAJ is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 3:11 am
  #3  
Just Joined
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3
jaykimball is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: movin to the uk

we are both us citizens, and she is currently studying to take her cpa exams, so she will be. that a good thing? a necessary thing?
jaykimball is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 4:28 am
  #4  
Just Joined
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego
Posts: 20
guaporusty is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: movin to the uk

Good luck with that! I lived in the UK for 2.5 years as an American. I was easily able to get a Work Permit as a science teacher, but the education system is very different and less then 15% of the American teachers recruited by my firm lasted past the first term. As a new teacher you will only have average and low ability grouped pupils and will spend the majority of your time baby-sitting working-class oiks that are not interested in learning--because they will be leaving school at age 16 and going straight to work. It is extremely depressing as the behaviour is much worse than you will be accostomed to unless you are coming from an inner-city school (Chicago, Compton, etc...)

As for your wife and the CPA qualification, the ACCA exam is the way to go. British universities and qualifications are regarded by most British employers as superior to American ones. As there is currently 10% unemployment and loads of labourers and skilled workings that do not require work permits flooding in from the EU, there is no motivation whatsoever for British people to hire an American. In skilled shortage areas, like nursing and teaching, exceptions are made. That said, accountancy is well-paid, competitive, and Deloitte (and others) hire public school youth that have uni degrees to push through the ACCA exam and wouldn't be overly keen on settling for an American CPA. If you currently work for such a firm, I would ask about ACCA sponsorship and a transfer. Otherwise, expect a VERY difficult employment search.
guaporusty is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 4:45 am
  #5  
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,560
kez81 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: movin to the uk

Originally Posted by guaporusty
Good luck with that! I lived in the UK for 2.5 years as an American. I was easily able to get a Work Permit as a science teacher, but the education system is very different and less then 15% of the American teachers recruited by my firm lasted past the first term. As a new teacher you will only have average and low ability grouped pupils and will spend the majority of your time baby-sitting working-class oiks that are not interested in learning--because they will be leaving school at age 16 and going straight to work. It is extremely depressing as the behaviour is much worse than you will be accostomed to unless you are coming from an inner-city school (Chicago, Compton, etc...)

As for your wife and the CPA qualification, the ACCA exam is the way to go. British universities and qualifications are regarded by most British employers as superior to American ones. As there is currently 10% unemployment and loads of labourers and skilled workings that do not require work permits flooding in from the EU, there is no motivation whatsoever for British people to hire an American. In skilled shortage areas, like nursing and teaching, exceptions are made. That said, accountancy is well-paid, competitive, and Deloitte (and others) hire public school youth that have uni degrees to push through the ACCA exam and wouldn't be overly keen on settling for an American CPA. If you currently work for such a firm, I would ask about ACCA sponsorship and a transfer. Otherwise, expect a VERY difficult employment search.
Can i ask what do you think ofd the education in the uk?? Do you think its good bad could be better??

Education is quite a big concern for some of us britshere in oz as it doesnt seem to be as good as that in the uk.

Ps. this is not a aussie bashing post just would be intresting to hear a outside view!!

kezx
kez81 is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 4:50 am
  #6  
JAJ
Retired
 
JAJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 34,649
JAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: movin to the uk

Originally Posted by guaporusty
As for your wife and the CPA qualification, the ACCA exam is the way to go.
A matter of opinion. U.S. CPA is more portable than pretty much any other qualification worldwide.

British universities and qualifications are regarded by most British employers as superior to American ones. As there is currently 10% unemployment
I don't know where that figure comes from but it's not the Office of National Statistics.

and loads of labourers and skilled workings that do not require work permits flooding in from the EU, there is no motivation whatsoever for British people to hire an American. In skilled shortage areas, like nursing and teaching, exceptions are made. That said, accountancy is well-paid, competitive, and Deloitte (and others) hire public school youth that have uni degrees to push through the ACCA exam and wouldn't be overly keen on settling for an American CPA.
That's not quite true - the U.S. CPA qualification is very well regarded worldwide (much more so than ACCA). And if there's a need for a British qualification then it ought to be possible to become an Irish Chartered Accountant through mutual recognition - http://www.icai.ie (Irish CA operates in Northern Ireland and hence is British as well as Irish).

Most firms like Deloitte encourage their students to study for the CA qualification, not ACCA.
JAJ is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 5:17 am
  #7  
Just Joined
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego
Posts: 20
guaporusty is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: movin to the uk

I don't know where that figure comes from but it's not the Office of National Statistics.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/6247345.stm

Okay. Pockets of London are at the 10% mark. This has been on the BBC website several times in the past year, esp. in regards to immigration law.
Originally Posted by JAJ

A matter of opinion.

U.S. CPA is more portable than pretty much any other qualification worldwide.

It doesn't matter if you disagree, but Deloitte recruiters in London feel that way. I've talked to them. After the whole accountancy scandals a few years back, there was a definite disdain for American accountants. My friend, an accountant for Coutts, would argue the ACCA is superior to CPA. Expect others in hire/fire positions to feel the same way. Employment will not been impossible, but resistance will be encountered.


Most firms like Deloitte encourage their students to study for the CA qualification, not ACCA.
Last time I looked at the Deloitte UK website, the university graduate training scheme put people through the ACCA qualification. Of course, that was two years ago so that may have changed.
guaporusty is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 5:29 am
  #8  
Just Joined
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego
Posts: 20
guaporusty is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: movin to the uk

My opinion on education UK vs. US as a teacher who as lived both system is:
-the UK primary school education is superior to the US one.
-the US secondary school education is superior to the UK one.
-not sure about the universities, but I think specialisation (UK system) makes more sense

According to the UK National Union of Teachers, 40% of secondary pupils have stopped making progress by the time they reach year 9. Because students cannot fail in the UK system, a failure to progress is permissible and that 40% that is not progressing takes a dispproportionate amount of time and resources as teachers waste time on behaviour issues pertaining to those students that have made they only choice they make get in secondary school--a choice not to learn. In the US secondary school, if you don't succeed you will repeat a course until you do pass it. It forces people to achieve to a minimum level.

A good US high school will offer AP and IB classes which are approximately equal in rigor to AS-levels in the UK. The standards are comparable.

As far as primary goes, I do think that the main advantage is reception in the UK starting at age 4 versus kindergarten commencing at age 5. There will be some acceleration as a result and the shorter school breaks means less learning is forgotten during the summer.

That said, there are some fantastic schools and some rubbish schools within 10 miles of my house, just as that was true of my home in Surrey UK. You have to do the research.

Values are different and I found that "cooperative learning", which is the US educational trend at the moment is not something valued in the UK. My line manager and my students both equated it with "mucking about" or in many cases the students would flat out refuse to engage. However, it isn't wrong and students can learn that way--it is just different. At an average school in the US, you just aren't likely to find as much direct instruction.

Originally Posted by kez81
Can i ask what do you think ofd the education in the uk?? Do you think its good bad could be better??

Education is quite a big concern for some of us britshere in oz as it doesnt seem to be as good as that in the uk.

Ps. this is not a aussie bashing post just would be intresting to hear a outside view!!

kezx
guaporusty is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 8:40 am
  #9  
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,560
kez81 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: movin to the uk

Thanks thats really intresting to hear your views

kezx

Last edited by kez81; Jul 10th 2007 at 8:42 am.
kez81 is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 10:38 am
  #10  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: Surrey ---> New York ---> Surrey ---> ???
Posts: 41
julii2020 is just really nicejulii2020 is just really nicejulii2020 is just really nicejulii2020 is just really nicejulii2020 is just really nicejulii2020 is just really nicejulii2020 is just really nicejulii2020 is just really nice
Default Re: movin to the uk

I qualified as a CPA in the USA and then came back to the UK three years ago. It's quite difficult to get a permanent job in UK accounting as the company reporting and tax laws are quite different and there is little reciprocity with UK qualifications.

Your wife will need two years of US audit experience to qualify as a CPA. With experience and the CPA qualification, obtaining temporary/contract work as an auditor will be relatively easy, as audit practice is similar on both sides of the Atlantic. Many Aussie and South African migrants with non-UK qualifications have taken this temp work route and I've found it to be more interesting and lucrative than the permanent roles I've been offered.
julii2020 is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 12:47 pm
  #11  
JAJ
Retired
 
JAJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 34,649
JAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: movin to the uk

Originally Posted by julii2020
I qualified as a CPA in the USA and then came back to the UK three years ago. It's quite difficult to get a permanent job in UK accounting as the company reporting and tax laws are quite different and there is little reciprocity with UK qualifications.
Once again - there is little reciprocity with most UK qualifications, except the Irish CAs (although not all U.S. CPAs qualify for this). If you are CA qualified, employers don't care whether it's from the England & Wales, Scotland or Ireland institute.

Your wife will need two years of US audit experience to qualify as a CPA.
Not necessarily. Depends on the rules of the particular state. And many states allow non-residents to become CPAs in that state.
JAJ is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 9:44 pm
  #12  
Former Floridian
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Back where I belong
Posts: 574
katesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond reputekatesbackagain has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: movin to the uk

Originally Posted by guaporusty
working-class oiks that are not interested in learning--because they will be leaving school at age 16 and going straight to work.
Hey, I resent that. I'm working-class, always have been, always will be, and damn proud of it. I also left school at 16 and I am educated enough to be choosy about where I work. Although I got good enough grades to go to college, I chose not to. Doesn't mean I'm an oik.
katesbackagain is offline  
Old Jul 10th 2007, 10:17 pm
  #13  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 89
gingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to allgingajoy is a name known to all
Default Re: movin to the uk

Originally Posted by jaykimball
Hi everyone, name's Jason, my wife and I currently live in the US and we are planning on saving up and moving to the UK. She's an accountant/auditor, I'm nearly done getting my teaching degree. We've done quite a bit of research on the UK and have loved pretty much everything we've found out. The culture, way of life, people, and everything else sound like we were just meant to be there. We've been looking at the Manchester area, but have no definite plan of where we want to go. We are planning on selling house/car and saving money for a year and a half to two years, so we have some time, but I feel like we should be prepared as possible since this is obviously a pretty big move. Anything at all that anyone can tell me what we'll need to do and make sure we have and everything would be great. Also, what can we expect pertaining to pretty much everything. We're planning a trip over there sometime in the near future so we'll learn more then, but I just love learning new things about the UK and am very looking forward to life there. Thanks a lot in advance.
Hi. I am british but based in the U.S. and my American Family and I are making the move to the Manchester area ourselves fairly soon.

I think the educational system in both countries has pros and cons. University is much more selective in the Uk, and fewer young people go than in the U.S.--the result is that studies are more focused (and it takes less time! it's also considerably cheaper... for now.) Teaching at a U.S. university for some time now, I have confronted students who are extremely literate and others who can literally hardly read. This would not be the case in the UK. The flipside to this--because UK students are pushed to self-select their academic/vocational interests earlier, a lot slip through the net (my brother is an example--super bright, but not too focused at 16 when he left school. Now he has found his feet very well, but I am frustrated that the system spat him out so young).

That said, it is much more possible in the Uk to have a decent and respectable career without a college degree. More vocational and apprenticeship like programs, etc. For instance, to become a nurse it is not necessary to have a degree--you learn "on the job' through training at a hospital. I think it might be more possible to "work through the ranks" in the UK than in the U.S. where not having a degree can hinder your chances of promotion quite a bit (this may have changed since I left, however).

Bottomline--if you are parents invested in your kids education, and do your homework on schools and how your child is doing, it is possible to have a well-rounded and educated child in both countries. IMO it's as much to do with good parenting as anything

If you are U.S. citizens, then I highly recommend uk-yankee.com. Lots of U.S. expats there based in the UK, and excellent resource for those nagging bureaucratic questions (though this board is a great resource too--especially JAJ and Elivira who know their stuff)

Good luck, and feel free to PM me if you have any specific questions about our move.
gingajoy is offline  
Old Jul 11th 2007, 1:13 am
  #14  
JAJ
Retired
 
JAJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 34,649
JAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond reputeJAJ has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: movin to the uk

Originally Posted by guaporusty
I don't know where that figure comes from but it's not the Office of National Statistics.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/6247345.stm

Okay. Pockets of London are at the 10% mark. This has been on the BBC website several times in the past year, esp. in regards to immigration law.
10% in "some pockets of London" is rather different to your insinuation that it is a widespread national rate.

After the whole accountancy scandals a few years back, there was a definite disdain for American accountants. My friend, an accountant for Coutts, would argue the ACCA is superior to CPA. Expect others in hire/fire positions to feel the same way. Employment will not been impossible, but resistance will be encountered.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia takes the opposite view. Most American CPA qualified accountants are able to become Australian CA through mutual recognition, while those who are ACCA qualified cannot do so.

In any case, most American CPAs who want to become locally qualified in the United Kingdom can become Irish CAs through mutual recognition.


Last time I looked at the Deloitte UK website, the university graduate training scheme put people through the ACCA qualification. Of course, that was two years ago so that may have changed.
They may do in exceptional cases, but it is not the norm, eg:
http://careers.deloitte.com/csc_gene...ontentID=12847

"In the majority of cases you will be required to study for the ACA qualification.

In a limited number of cases we will consider applications from graduates who wish to study for a different professional qualification such as ACCA."
JAJ is offline  
Old Jul 11th 2007, 2:59 am
  #15  
Just Joined
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego
Posts: 20
guaporusty is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: movin to the uk

No offense intended. I know many great working-class people, but
I bet if I asked you have some fantastic stories about making teachers run round in circles while you and your friends did nothing for 3 years.

Originally Posted by katesbackagain
Hey, I resent that. I'm working-class, always have been, always will be, and damn proud of it. I also left school at 16 and I am educated enough to be choosy about where I work. Although I got good enough grades to go to college, I chose not to. Doesn't mean I'm an oik.
guaporusty is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.