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Does anyone else think like this?

Does anyone else think like this?

Old Jan 16th 2009, 4:06 am
  #16  
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Originally Posted by stepnek
Well, you see the problem with this moving to another country lark is that in the main it's for discontented people that think that there's a whole big better world out there. I don't mean those with an adventuring spirit I mean those of us that think by swapping to a new country it will solve everything.

I thought that when we moved to Canada but of course all we did was replace one set of problems with another. That then leads to thinking that maybe the old country wasn't so bad after all and if you're really unlucky you move back and then instead of accepting the inevitable and making the best of it you up sticks again and try another move!

I see myself as a person who having spent most of my life thinking that there's probably something better on the horizon is finally appreciating that we have to make the best of what we have and accept that there's no where that is perfect.

We can change this and we can change that but it depends on us as individuals as to whether we can find contentment. My OH is great. She sees the best of every situation and can fit in anywhere. I so wish that I felt the same because it would save me a lot of deep stressful thinking and heartache at times.
How true

Originally Posted by tinytears
Sorry I didn't mean it to sound as if we wouldn't have those expenses elsewhere because I know that we will of course. It was specifically the owning of a house that we probably won't do - if we were here (UK) we would have nothing left - have no idea about Canada but no doubt it is the same.

Fuel in Canada seems to be much cheaper (research and reccy), so much of the fuel charges here are taxes over actual price.

My main bugbear with being here is that it is people who work here are finding more and more they are paying for those that don't. One of the biggest differences here is the sink communities and the open door immigration policies of this government - not immigrants that come in and work and contribute to society, I have *no* problems with that at all, it is those that are taking but not contributing that is a different matter.
I would advise you not to make that the main reason for moving though, when you have you'll probably realise it doesn't really impact on your life and money is wasted in all countries.
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Old Jan 16th 2009, 4:55 am
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Originally Posted by Sally Redux
How true



I would advise you not to make that the main reason for moving though, when you have you'll probably realise it doesn't really impact on your life and money is wasted in all countries.
Oh it isn't our main reason at all, just a contributory factor. We have many reasons for wanting to go but especially because we have very close family in Canada (siblings).
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Old Jan 16th 2009, 5:26 am
  #18  
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Depending on the current rate of interest and house prices, buying/paying a mortgage can actually be a lot cheaper than renting. If you bought a UK house for in, say, 1998 and have a tracker mortgage, you're probably not paying more than 150-200 pounds a month to buy your house. You can't rent a garage at those prices.

Of course, the headache with a mortgage is that you own a big debt. However, again assuming you bought back in 1998, you can always sell it and net a handy profit (even if you do have to sell at a "loss" to what you could have got 12 months ago - never understood that mentality).

As for simplifying your life, I'm not sure that's any different between a renter or a buyer - either of them can choose to turn the heating down, choose not to have a TV, cycle instead of drive, compost and gor your own, freecycle, etc.

I've always thought that the option of simplifying life by "not working" was available mainly to (a) those fortunate to have enough capital they can take a year off, (b) those who choose to be unemployed and let the taxpayer fund them for a while, and (c) those who are willing to sponge off the goodwill of others.

Other than a few "exceptional" (interpret that as you want) individuals, I don't think there are many people who can literally drift around picking up work here and there, miraculously finding offers of short-term (free) accomodation, etc. That's the stuff of Hollywood and people with very vivid imaginations. If you walked around Glasgow saying you will do any kind of work, in return for food and a night's accomodation, you'd probably be told to **** off or get mugged.
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Old Jan 16th 2009, 7:38 am
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

I couldn't not work. I love my job. The problem I have had though is that I missed so many opportunities and possibilities because I've been so busy paying bills and looking after a family. My husband also loves his job and shares the same view. A life of hard work, working to live and keep others in the lifestyle they expected (huge mistake trying to keep everyone happy). Today, those same families don't speak to us or include us, if they do it's lip service. I'm not sure why, it's mostly due to bitter ex partners jealous of us moving on with our lives after they left.

Anyway, the whole experience of working for so many years just to pay all the bills and support a family, then find that that same family doesn't want to know us has left us with a sparkling revelation and opportunity. This is, we are free to start our lives again.
Personally, I would rather put all my energy and focus into my career and business (I'm a designer). Finally, I feel I can do this after many years of having to compromise and balance a family. I don't regret having a family but I obviously feel a bit cheated at how things have worked out. But rather than focus on the downside, I'm taking the situation as my chance to put everything into my ambition and career at last. So is my husband.
We talked last night and decided to live small but enjoy our newfound freedom by working in jobs and careers that we both love.
A small home, ordinary car, and just weekends away instead of holidays are our new order. Enjoying our work, looking after ourselves for a change and having the time to experience the simple things in life are now our aim.
We've never lived to excess anyway, but the pressure of families and their needs perhaps drove us to working so hard just to please everyone, that we entered a spiral of just working and sleeping.

I am looking forward to going back to the UK and starting over again with different priorities.
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Old Jan 16th 2009, 8:29 am
  #20  
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

I think a lot of people got carried away on the idea that a house is going to go up and up in price and fast, too, so why not buy the best we can qualify for?

I'm one of the ones who still wants to own, as we have most of our adult lives. But, we've always owned something that won't stretch us too much, even if what we buy isn't as "nice" as what we could rent. We've also followed the rule of not buying one of the pricier houses in an area. And we've never bought a new or newish house in a suburb. That's always chancy because when you want to sell there are probably a bunch of others much the same on offer plus new developments for the people who like to buy a completely new house.

Also, there's the being on the property ladder factor. We might not overall make money, but we're keeping up with inflation. If prices go up, then where we want to move to, we can afford to buy. If they don't, then where we want to move to will still be affordable. Not foolproof. Moving from a lower priced area to Victoria required putting some extra savings into a smaller house!

So I still think buying the place we live is better overall as long as we don't take too big a mortgage to have a dream home, or in the belief that the place is bound to keep going up in value.

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Old Jan 16th 2009, 9:36 pm
  #21  
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Look owning your own home is truly a great investment for you retirement what most people fail to recognise is there are good times to buy and not so good times like the past say 5yrs values have been unrealistis as an investment point of view but just say you were say 50% in profit from your home the plus is you can sell and take your cash and relocate anywhere around the world but having no investment for your retirement means your choices are very limited if you dont want to let the greedy british taxman get his sticky paws on your hard earned cash then sell your home relocate and rent in your old age whilst spending YOUR money until it runs out hopefully you can estimate how long you will live for lol for me ive always rented and invested my money in stockmarkets so i have and income and stocks with value to buy a house outright but now i sold all my stocks and have longterm deposit accounts but still enough interest to maintain my lifestyle so buying property is a good thing but you must know when to sell or you will end up seeing your property value decline and you equity with it .
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Old Jan 17th 2009, 11:46 am
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

What a good thread.... started reading, got hooked in then realised it's you cricket!
Way too late in the wee small hours to put any thoughts together but hope to come back another time; meanwhile you all made me think of some (former -another story) friends of mine whose lifestyle I couldn't decide if I really envied or couldn't hack. They lived a permacultural life, owned 'half' a car for emergencies but basically had decided their home on the basis of proximity to railway station, biked everywhere, solar panels, almost entirely self sufficient. However they lived in a massive beautiful 16th century converted barn, three storey, listed building, complete with mortgage & they both still had to go out to work.........
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Old Jan 17th 2009, 12:47 pm
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Originally Posted by fionamw
What a good thread.... started reading, got hooked in then realised it's you cricket!
Way too late in the wee small hours to put any thoughts together but hope to come back another time; meanwhile you all made me think of some (former -another story) friends of mine whose lifestyle I couldn't decide if I really envied or couldn't hack. They lived a permacultural life, owned 'half' a car for emergencies but basically had decided their home on the basis of proximity to railway station, biked everywhere, solar panels, almost entirely self sufficient. However they lived in a massive beautiful 16th century converted barn, three storey, listed building, complete with mortgage & they both still had to go out to work.........
Yes, it is me, thinking out loud more than anything. My husband and I are currently weighing up all our options and thinking about what we need and what we can live without. I can feel a decision happening soon about when we return to the UK. My husband is beautiful dreamer and I'm a down to earth realist so between us, we are planning the next stage of our lives by asking ourselves what it is that we really want to do.
I definately don't want a big house again and it's interesting because I've got several friends who have ditched the large house just so they can have a life without being tied to gardening, maintenance and all the large bills that go with owning a large property. We all agree it is a ball and chain.
I enjoy my career and feel that I'm at a point where I have the freedom to put all my energy into growing a business without being compromised by family and running a home. It was like a cross between a running hotel, a Chinese laundry and a hot food takeaway at Waterloo station not to mention the upkeep.
My husband loves DIY and renovation so we think we'll have 12 months back home establishing business (no, I'm not worried about the 'recession',), rent while we look around seeing where we want to live and then buy or build a home at the end of 2009. Whichever, the idea is to work in jobs we enjoy, take some time out and not get bogged down in just existing to pay the bills.
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Old Jan 19th 2009, 12:15 am
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Originally Posted by cricket1
I'm staying off the threads at the moment because I'm weighing up some options and don't want to be influenced one way or the other by what's posted here but I do have a question and would be interested in what others think.

Instead of moving straight back to the UK and taking the normal route of renting a house, working and getting straight back into a routine, I'm asking myself how come we all follow the same old, same old of studying, qualifying, working, having children, working, sleeping, more work then along comes a crisis and bang, suddenly we're all on the hop looking down a deep black hole realising that all along we've been working, not for ourselves but for the bank, the government, family, etc, etc and then in the blink of an eye, some greedy financiers do the wrong thing and the whole global economy is in trouble.
Then we're all facing working even harder to repay even more money and to keep what we've achieved so far.

Does anyone else see the benefits of actually not owning anything instead of working to keep it? In other words, just working to survive?

I'm currently weighing up, not rushing back to UK as planned but renting out the house, or selling everything then just floating along but ready to accept opportunities as they arise.
I've noticed that while it's nice to own your home and have a steady business or job, you can end up equally trapped by them. For example, we can't sell the house in a flat market so we can't head back to the UK without being tied to here. That's not a huge problem but it's not total freedom either.

They are just my thoughts but in light of how people have worked hard and done the right thing all their lives and are now facing loss on a great scale of their supers and savings, I just wonder if it's better to live light, let your dog sleep guarding what's under your mattress and do a job for the love of it rather than the money.
We are in the process of making some decisions. Hubby and I have always taken life as it comes by trying to open as many doors on the way. Never followed the obvious paths but having owned (well the bank did) a few properties we have come to the conclusion that we perhaps would prefer to sell up for a bit of a loss and then actually do somethings we want and rent for longer. Hubby can earn some half decent money but in a professional he doesn't enjoy and but the work at this level is not available in every town more major cities. What his profession does do is give opportunities to move into his preferred less paid profession but as a mature student and with a young family the balance is very tricky. We value spending time with the kids and having some extra money to say go to the cinema, eat out or take a family outing. A trip back to England is also rated pretty high for us at the moment.

There is a fine line between owning a property / cars etc and being in rentals. We are concerned that we might feel less settled in Australia if we do sell and live in rental but at the same time we would like to have more things than just the house.

I guess your post struck a cord because we are trying to way up what our next move is.

We moved to Australia just under 2 years ago and knew we would stay and get citizenship regardless. Hubby would have a look for work and opportunities for moving on after 1 to 2 years but was prepared to work doing something just to give us all more opportunities and more decisions. We are expecting our 3 child and know this will financially put us under more pressure. Hubby still working hard to move forward with some work opportunities (things looking better at work) and study some more, house will be put on the market, have baby, apply for citizenship, rent for a few years but do some things that are important to us.

It's taken us several months of not feeling settled to really work out what we need to do for us not what parents, in laws and everyone else thinks is the right path for us.

Not sure this helps but just our story.
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Old Jan 19th 2009, 1:15 am
  #25  
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

We have been extremely fortunate in being able to buy our past two houses outright....I'll explain, as it just luck and not our especially good financial knowledge.

We moved to Canada in 1981 having sold a small terraced house; the money from that enabled us, after living in an apartment for two years and adding to the pot, to get a mortgage on a house. We stayed there for a further few years before circumstances took us back to England; this decision coincided very nicely with a "vendors' market", and as our house was one of the two for sale at that time we made a healthy profit. When we got back to England we realised we wouldn't be able to get a mortgage because a) we'd been away for so long and b) Mr Oldbag was self-employed. At that time those two factors went against us. We were lucky enough to find an old hovel in desperate need of modernisation, so bought it outright, the idea being to do it up and buy something better in about two years. We lived very modest lives, without the trappings that many people feel are necessary; holidays abroad and designer clothes weren't part of our lives. We ran our own small business and lived hand to mouth much of the time, so it took a little longer than two years. Eighteen years later we decided to upsticks and return to Canada to retire, so the old hovel, now modernised, was put up for sale. It had increased in value by 900%, so we made a killing. This, combined with an excellent rate of exchange allowed us to arrive in Canada in a very healthy situation financially, so much so we bought our house outright again! The freedom this gave us was unbelievable.......but, we still wanted to work part time so we could keep the rest of our capital invested. Alas the work situation wasn't good, we lived in a hostile town (all this is well documented here in BE), so almost four years later we decided to come home for good. Once again we were lucky.....we sold at just the right time (April 2008), without the use of a real estate agent (that saved almost $9000!), the exchange rate was good, and so we've come home fairly well off.

We'd often said we didn't really want to own our own house again, as the realisation that you're not happy with where you are, for whatever reason, can be very stressful, especially if you have the worry of property to sell. So we looked at our options and decided to try to find work with accommodation. We came home on June 30th last year, and by September 1st had secured our current job. Apart from the fact that we love where we live, what we do, and who we work for, we are also happy that we own, on the face of it, very little. The freedom we have now is absolutely fantastic.

I appreciate so much of this is down to luck, and timing...as I said right at the beginning....but owning your own pile of bricks is not the be all and end all of Life and Living. If you own nothing, it can't be taken away from you! We have a grown up daughter who is about to start her own business, so we''l be able to help her as well as doing some of the things we've always wanted to do....bought us tickets for a hot air balloon ride for Christmas, so we've that to look forward to. There are so many places in Europe we want to see, and now we can. When I look back to where we were and what we were doing this time last year, it's quite unbelievable how you can change your life IF you're prepared to look at things laterally, and have the confidence to change.

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Old Jan 19th 2009, 8:43 am
  #26  
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

It sounds like a lot of people are thinking along the same lines. We've made our decision to sell up and move back to the UK within the next few months, by April I hope. We thought we might keep a house here but to be honest, I can't see myself returning and I don't want to run the risk of problems with tenants while I'm not in the country.
In my 20's, I lived in a static home while we renovated a house and I loved it. Life got complicated when we upgraded to a bigger house.
As we have no credit rating and our stuff will be on a container for 3 months, we will be renting anyway but I don't want to rush out and buy furniture when i don't know where we will end up living.
The first priority is to decide where we want to live then find business premises, so I've just made enquiries about staying in a holiday park in a static home as soon as we rrove.
70,00 pounds a week plus bond. Plus it's all furnished, we can just unpack our cases and we're home. This will be our base till our container arrives and while we drive up hill and down dale having a look around. Finally, our lives will get going again.
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Old Jan 19th 2009, 12:33 pm
  #27  
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Originally Posted by cricket1
70,00 pounds a week plus bond. Plus it's all furnished, we can just unpack our cases and we're home. This will be our base till our container arrives and while we drive up hill and down dale having a look around. Finally, our lives will get going again.
Can you confirm the price Cricket - is that GBP70 per week? And in what part of UK would that be?

Some very interesting stories/thoughts in this thread, by the way...

"Lateral thinking " - yup!
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Old Jan 19th 2009, 12:59 pm
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Originally Posted by Black Sheep
Can you confirm the price Cricket - is that GBP70 per week? And in what part of UK would that be?

Some very interesting stories/thoughts in this thread, by the way...

"Lateral thinking " - yup!
70.00 GBP per week plus a bond but not sure how much, don't think it will be much though. It's in Leics, just outside of Market Harborough so nice area. It appeals to us because it gives us total flexibility for a few months while we decide where we want to be.
It was either a static home or a houseboat. Either is fine by me.
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Old Jan 19th 2009, 1:18 pm
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

Here's a link of brand new static homes


http://www.willerby.com/

Even the older ones though are not bad. If we buy a building plot and get planning permission, we'll have no objection to living in one. For the moment though, getting off a plane and living in one till our stuff arrives is a good option. They are connected to power and water so it's just like living in a bungalow or small apartment.
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Old Jan 20th 2009, 8:47 am
  #30  
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Default Re: Does anyone else think like this?

These static homes are very, very nice and very comfortable. However, getting planning permission to put one on a building plot can be another story, unless in Leics. area it is easier, but down south in Dorset/Hampshire areas it doesn't seem as easy.

There is a monthly magazine called Park Homes and they also devote half the magazine to static holiday homes.
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