Go Back  British Expats > Living & Moving Abroad > Moving back or to the UK
Reload this Page >

The changing seasons of my mind

The changing seasons of my mind

Old May 22nd 2009, 7:07 pm
  #16  
Account Closed
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 3,533
TraceyW is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by Exile
We’ve been back in England for just over a year now (after five years in Japan and four in Perth, Western Australia). There have been some ups and downs along the way, and I haven’t really posted much as I was waiting for my feelings to stabilize. It’s been quite a hard year emotionally, but also a good one in many ways.

Yesterday evening I was driving through the Cotswolds (along the Fosse Way, built by the Romans, no less) on my way back from the swimming pool, and it struck me again what an amazing landscape we have here (I’ll try to refrain from overwrought descriptions of hills, dry stone walls, fields of yellow rapeseed flowers, ancient church spires in the distance and clusters of honey-coloured limestone buildings in perfect harmony with a landscape that has been shaped by centuries of agriculture, all illuminated by gentle late-evening sunshine!).

Anyway, I started thinking about how we perceive what is around us, and what sometimes leads people to uproot themselves and their families and move away.

Having been back a year, we have now seen the seasons come full circle. I had been a bit apprehensive about the winter, but the hardest season for me was last summer, which was pretty dismal I have to say. Autumn here was quite cold but with lots of sunshine, and an amazing display of red leaves. Winter was the coldest in years, or so I’m told, but again it came with lots of sunshine, mist, beautiful crisp, cold days. Not much rain. There was a week or so when we were clearing snow most days. The spring flowers and blossom were stunning as the countryside came back to life after a hard winter.

As I was driving home yesterday, for some reason I began thinking about a famous Japanese poem, which is generally translated along the lines of

“The bell of the Gion Temple
Echoes the impermanence of all things…”

It’s inspired by Buddhism of course, but in Japan there seems to be quite a strong idea of how there is melancholy in true beauty, how things that flourish inevitably decline, and how this transience is what makes things valuable.

Rambling incoherently now, but I guess what I was feeling was how the lazy spring, evening in the countryside feels all the more sweet for having been through a harsh winter. How the greyness and the rain is what makes the countryside so lush and so beautiful when caught in sunlight. How the months with bare branches and ploughed fields make the landscape seem all the more green right now.

I think there is a tendency for the human mind (mine in particular, perhaps, or is it just the British mind?) to latch on to the negatives. In our minds eye, the UK becomes dominated by the greyness and the rain, just as the notion of Australia becomes white sandy beaches, turquoise ocean and constant sunshine.

Then begins the quest to exchange this permanently dull UK for the permanently bright Australia, with its never-ending summer.

But I think perhaps that what we can end up with is an artificial flower. It looks pretty on the surface, and lasts forever, but has no real value.

Does the quest for perfection lead to dullness? Is melancholy underrated and should it be embraced?

End of sermon.
Bloody hell, that was deep and meaningful Loved the bit about the countryside though, so touched a chord with me.

Oh, and England isn't permanently dull... it's blue skies and sunshine all around this weekend Hope you've got the sunshine up where you are too. Keep smiling and feel free to write such beautifully deep and meaningful posts whenever you like!!

Last edited by TraceyW; May 22nd 2009 at 7:13 pm.
TraceyW is offline  
Old May 22nd 2009, 7:08 pm
  #17  
Account Closed
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 3,533
TraceyW is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by tinamichelle
That was so beautifully written,

Its cold in Perth at the moment and I've had to drive in hail and dodge fallen trees to pick my kids up from school (no electricity so they get the day off)

Like most I do complain about the cold but I would happily wear 3 jumpers, move back to the uk and take the drive you took.

I so want to go home

Then come home if you can, life's too short to be unhappy
TraceyW is offline  
Old May 22nd 2009, 7:36 pm
  #18  
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Herne Bay, Kent, England.
Posts: 442
MartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud of
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by ann m
Ditto - so beautifully thought out and written.

Climate, weather, sunshine - they do all have a massive impact on our lives, whether we realise it or not, or whether the realisation dawns belatedly. I think we have lost our ability to be in tune with the seasons and what goes on around us and we have moved away from listening to the heartbeats of nature (good god, that sounds way too hippi-ish to come from me ). But it's true.

And as to our searching for the never-neverland, 'tis a human trait I believe! Some of us 'get it' early and find a happy fulfilling life quite quickly; some of us (most on this board I would hazard to say) muddle through the middle years just looking around the world, and checking to see if they missed something fundamental, while others still may never find much inner happiness. I'm still in that middle ground, though I do know 'happiness' isn't "stuff". And I guess I've always known it, but sometimes it needs to be pointed out with flashing neon lights.

And I'm more in tune with the weather, the climate and the seasons now, than I ever was when I was fed up with grey England! Think I'm even more confused about what I like and don't like
How true is that? I've been in the middle ground for a long time and am beginning to slip still further towards never finding much inner happiness. Lots of things make me happy - the special needs students I work with, for instance, who collectively bring out the best in me; a good book; those few brief and far apart moments when I'm doing my own writing and an idea comes to life and gets perfectly expressed. But I'm a long way from true contentment. Part of my reason for applying to emigrate to Canada was the hope that such a profound change of life - effectively, an opportunity to be a 'different' person: an unknown in a new world - might help me in my quest. I'm not so sure now, though. I wonder if I might just be casting off one set of discontentments for another set that I can't even begin to anticipate yet.
MartianTom is offline  
Old May 22nd 2009, 8:11 pm
  #19  
Oscar nominated
 
BristolUK's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Moncton, NB, CANADA
Posts: 50,800
BristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond reputeBristolUK has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by Exile
(I’ll try to refrain from overwrought descriptions of hills, dry stone walls, fields of yellow rapeseed flowers, ancient church spires in the distance and clusters of honey-coloured limestone buildings in perfect harmony with a landscape that has been shaped by centuries of agriculture, all illuminated by gentle late-evening sunshine!).
That was refraining?
BristolUK is offline  
Old May 22nd 2009, 8:30 pm
  #20  
Just hanging around
 
Bevm's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Back in England
Posts: 1,447
Bevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond reputeBevm has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by MartianTom
Part of my reason for applying to emigrate to Canada was the hope that such a profound change of life - effectively, an opportunity to be a 'different' person: an unknown in a new world - might help me in my quest.
I honestly don't think it works like that. We're never a different person. We can be new to others, but who we are'll be clear right off.

Sometimes who we are changes with lifestyle changes, but we can do that without moving so far. Sometimes a modest geographical change, even of neighbourhoods within a city, lets us shed stuff and free new aspects of ourselves. Being among people we feel comfortable with is a big part of that, but it's really hard to know that without testing it out first.

Are you on bulletin boards or lists with people in Canada? That's one way. Our natures and ways of thinking come across the internet.

Bev
Bevm is offline  
Old May 23rd 2009, 9:39 am
  #21  
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Herne Bay, Kent, England.
Posts: 442
MartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud of
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by Bevm
I honestly don't think it works like that. We're never a different person. We can be new to others, but who we are'll be clear right off.

Sometimes who we are changes with lifestyle changes, but we can do that without moving so far. Sometimes a modest geographical change, even of neighbourhoods within a city, lets us shed stuff and free new aspects of ourselves. Being among people we feel comfortable with is a big part of that, but it's really hard to know that without testing it out first.

Are you on bulletin boards or lists with people in Canada? That's one way. Our natures and ways of thinking come across the internet.

Bev
Thanks, Bev. I guess what I really mean is that I feel very stifled and hemmed in with the way I live now. I've lived in this town far too long, and too many people know me. I'm fed up with the same sights and the same faces. I've never found a part of this country I could ever really call 'home', either. As you say, though, there are no guarantees that such a move would change any of that; I may equally not feel 'at home' in Canada - although the visits I've made there, including an extensive period of travel, have made me feel very positive about the country. Touring a place and actually living in it, though, are obviously very different things. All I can really do is try, I suppose. It's not as if it's a 'no turning back' thing. I travel light. If I go, I'll sell everything and just pitch up there with a rucksack of clothes, and make my way from there. So there's not a great deal to lose, moneywise or otherwise.
MartianTom is offline  
Old May 23rd 2009, 10:00 am
  #22  
never settled
 
S E A N's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 227
S E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to allS E A N is a name known to all
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by MartianTom
Thanks, Bev. I guess what I really mean is that I feel very stifled and hemmed in with the way I live now. I've lived in this town far too long, and too many people know me. I'm fed up with the same sights and the same faces. I've never found a part of this country I could ever really call 'home', either. As you say, though, there are no guarantees that such a move would change any of that; I may equally not feel 'at home' in Canada - although the visits I've made there, including an extensive period of travel, have made me feel very positive about the country. Touring a place and actually living in it, though, are obviously very different things. All I can really do is try, I suppose. It's not as if it's a 'no turning back' thing. I travel light. If I go, I'll sell everything and just pitch up there with a rucksack of clothes, and make my way from there. So there's not a great deal to lose, moneywise or otherwise.
That's kind of what I'm searching for, just to feel 'new' in a sense...

Last edited by S E A N; May 23rd 2009 at 10:06 am.
S E A N is offline  
Old May 23rd 2009, 10:06 am
  #23  
jmh
BE Forum Addict
 
jmh's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Location: South Auckland
Posts: 2,228
jmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond reputejmh has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by S E A N
That's kind of work I'm searching for, just to feel 'new' in a sense...
I found that when I came to the UK (could have been any country by the way) I was able to reinvent myself. It took me a while to realise this, but I think having moved away from all that was familiar I looked at things with fresh eyes. Having said this, the changes I made came from within me, not the place I moved to.
jmh is offline  
Old May 23rd 2009, 8:11 pm
  #24  
Searching for contentment
 
ukintexas's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 513
ukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond reputeukintexas has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

[QUOTE=Exile;7591569]
But I think perhaps that what we can end up with is an artificial flower. It looks pretty on the surface, and lasts forever, but has no real value.
QUOTE]

Great post, and definitely a thought provoking/widening one for those of us struggling with decisions about where we truly want to be. I often explain some of the perceived positives of where I am based (Houston, TX) as being a "veneer" - as on the surface things do look much better here, beit the weather, the shopping malls, the facilities etc, but you have summed it up in a much more perfect way. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.
ukintexas is offline  
Old May 24th 2009, 10:35 pm
  #25  
BE Enthusiast
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 936
Exile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by pommybird
Hey you - long time no hear!! I think you may just have that expats curse - always striving for that one place that ticks ALL the boxes - well as we all know it doesn't exist but for me it's simple it's all about what you feel deep down in your heart - having been back in the UK for nearly 3 years although there are obvious flaws with the UK for me it just 'feels right.'

Good luck with the soul searching - you'll get there in the end!!
Hi Pommybird,

Yes, it's been a while since I started a thread. I always meant to post updates, but thought I'd wait until I knew where my head was. I gave up waiting and decided to post anyway!

It does feel very right here for me too in many important ways. Seeing my children struggle due to my decision was the hardest part, but things are looking much better recently. Thanks much for your kind wishes.
Exile is offline  
Old May 24th 2009, 10:45 pm
  #26  
BE Enthusiast
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 936
Exile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by TraceyW
Bloody hell, that was deep and meaningful Loved the bit about the countryside though, so touched a chord with me.

Oh, and England isn't permanently dull... it's blue skies and sunshine all around this weekend Hope you've got the sunshine up where you are too. Keep smiling and feel free to write such beautifully deep and meaningful posts whenever you like!!
Hi Tracy,

Yes, it's been a great weekend (I'm probably working Monday, so just the two days for me).

Took the car for a service at Stratford upon Avon yesterday. And what a fantastic place to hang around waiting for your car to be serviced!

My parents are up this weekend, so today we went for lunch at a beautiful old pub in the countryside... beer garden and a stream with a little bridge, not a cloud in the sky, kids playing happily by the water. Visited the roman villa afterwards. Perfect day, really.
Exile is offline  
Old May 24th 2009, 10:49 pm
  #27  
BE Enthusiast
Thread Starter
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 936
Exile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond reputeExile has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by BristolUK
That was refraining?
Yeah, that took a lot of discipline. You should see me when I'm on a roll...
Exile is offline  
Old May 25th 2009, 2:15 am
  #28  
Its all going south......
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Sussex
Posts: 433
betsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of lightbetsyboob is a glorious beacon of light
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by Exile
We’ve been back in England for just over a year now (after five years in Japan and four in Perth, Western Australia). There have been some ups and downs along the way, and I haven’t really posted much as I was waiting for my feelings to stabilize. It’s been quite a hard year emotionally, but also a good one in many ways.

Yesterday evening I was driving through the Cotswolds (along the Fosse Way, built by the Romans, no less) on my way back from the swimming pool, and it struck me again what an amazing landscape we have here (I’ll try to refrain from overwrought descriptions of hills, dry stone walls, fields of yellow rapeseed flowers, ancient church spires in the distance and clusters of honey-coloured limestone buildings in perfect harmony with a landscape that has been shaped by centuries of agriculture, all illuminated by gentle late-evening sunshine!).

Anyway, I started thinking about how we perceive what is around us, and what sometimes leads people to uproot themselves and their families and move away.

Having been back a year, we have now seen the seasons come full circle. I had been a bit apprehensive about the winter, but the hardest season for me was last summer, which was pretty dismal I have to say. Autumn here was quite cold but with lots of sunshine, and an amazing display of red leaves. Winter was the coldest in years, or so I’m told, but again it came with lots of sunshine, mist, beautiful crisp, cold days. Not much rain. There was a week or so when we were clearing snow most days. The spring flowers and blossom were stunning as the countryside came back to life after a hard winter.

As I was driving home yesterday, for some reason I began thinking about a famous Japanese poem, which is generally translated along the lines of

“The bell of the Gion Temple
Echoes the impermanence of all things…”

It’s inspired by Buddhism of course, but in Japan there seems to be quite a strong idea of how there is melancholy in true beauty, how things that flourish inevitably decline, and how this transience is what makes things valuable.

Rambling incoherently now, but I guess what I was feeling was how the lazy spring, evening in the countryside feels all the more sweet for having been through a harsh winter. How the greyness and the rain is what makes the countryside so lush and so beautiful when caught in sunlight. How the months with bare branches and ploughed fields make the landscape seem all the more green right now.

I think there is a tendency for the human mind (mine in particular, perhaps, or is it just the British mind?) to latch on to the negatives. In our minds eye, the UK becomes dominated by the greyness and the rain, just as the notion of Australia becomes white sandy beaches, turquoise ocean and constant sunshine.

Then begins the quest to exchange this permanently dull UK for the permanently bright Australia, with its never-ending summer.

But I think perhaps that what we can end up with is an artificial flower. It looks pretty on the surface, and lasts forever, but has no real value.

Does the quest for perfection lead to dullness? Is melancholy underrated and should it be embraced?

End of sermon.

I think that this is spot on (although a little deep for a simple person like me!).
I have read a few people on here say that Australia is 'soulless', and i agree. As beautiful as parts of it is, it seems to lack something, which, i think is soul - maybe not to the Australians but to me.

The most beautiful parts of the country are the natural parts, the beaches, mountains etc. But the rest of it is manmade, and as such i find very samey. I find that in England we have another beauty as well as the landscape, that is also manmade - our architacture. With our long streching history we have so many beautiful old buildings, landmarks, old villages, even pubs! which all contribute to the soul that England has, as does the climate which is so varied from season to season that it creates a wonderful feeling each season, one different to the next.

I find that living in a sunny climate it is easy to take the sun for granted as you know that the next day will more than likely be the same - which i personally find very boring. In England, we don't have the best climate in terms of sun but when we have a good day we get out and make the most of it. I miss the change in seasons, the falling of leaves in Autumn, the crispness in winter, the good days of summer and the blossoms in spring.

There is much to say for the UK, but unfortunately i think it can take leaving to see it.
betsyboob is offline  
Old May 25th 2009, 2:24 am
  #29  
BE Forum Addict
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Perth
Posts: 3,453
NKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond reputeNKSK version 2 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

Originally Posted by Exile
We’ve been back in England for just over a year now (after five years in Japan and four in Perth, Western Australia). There have been some ups and downs along the way, and I haven’t really posted much as I was waiting for my feelings to stabilize. It’s been quite a hard year emotionally, but also a good one in many ways.

Yesterday evening I was driving through the Cotswolds (along the Fosse Way, built by the Romans, no less) on my way back from the swimming pool, and it struck me again what an amazing landscape we have here (I’ll try to refrain from overwrought descriptions of hills, dry stone walls, fields of yellow rapeseed flowers, ancient church spires in the distance and clusters of honey-coloured limestone buildings in perfect harmony with a landscape that has been shaped by centuries of agriculture, all illuminated by gentle late-evening sunshine!).

Anyway, I started thinking about how we perceive what is around us, and what sometimes leads people to uproot themselves and their families and move away.

Having been back a year, we have now seen the seasons come full circle. I had been a bit apprehensive about the winter, but the hardest season for me was last summer, which was pretty dismal I have to say. Autumn here was quite cold but with lots of sunshine, and an amazing display of red leaves. Winter was the coldest in years, or so I’m told, but again it came with lots of sunshine, mist, beautiful crisp, cold days. Not much rain. There was a week or so when we were clearing snow most days. The spring flowers and blossom were stunning as the countryside came back to life after a hard winter.

As I was driving home yesterday, for some reason I began thinking about a famous Japanese poem, which is generally translated along the lines of

“The bell of the Gion Temple
Echoes the impermanence of all things…”

It’s inspired by Buddhism of course, but in Japan there seems to be quite a strong idea of how there is melancholy in true beauty, how things that flourish inevitably decline, and how this transience is what makes things valuable.

Rambling incoherently now, but I guess what I was feeling was how the lazy spring, evening in the countryside feels all the more sweet for having been through a harsh winter. How the greyness and the rain is what makes the countryside so lush and so beautiful when caught in sunlight. How the months with bare branches and ploughed fields make the landscape seem all the more green right now.

I think there is a tendency for the human mind (mine in particular, perhaps, or is it just the British mind?) to latch on to the negatives. In our minds eye, the UK becomes dominated by the greyness and the rain, just as the notion of Australia becomes white sandy beaches, turquoise ocean and constant sunshine.

.
I think the buddhists were actually just applying basic microeconomic theory to aesthetics.
I think you're completely right about the beauty of an English summer being enhanced by the 6 months of poor weather and dull countryside which precedes it.
My only concern with this philosophy in my case is the logical extension - that we put ourselves through hellish weather - and for me this is the endless dull grey rather than violent storms - so that we can really enjoy the blue sky day when it arrives.
Some people - I suspect that you are one - can find a dull grey November day when it gets light at 7.30 and dark at 4pm energising - or at least not depressing. Increasingly over the years I couldn't do that in the UK - my opinion of the English countryside, that there is nowhere more beautiful on a blue sky day - was becoming more influenced by the unreliability of summer and the potenial to get those seemingly endless grey days.

It's funny but when I was writing the above, a newspaper story from 1993 kept springing to mind - was it a Tory MP who suffocated whilst starving himself of oxygen whilst trying to enhance orgasmic sensation?
NKSK version 2 is offline  
Old May 25th 2009, 10:09 am
  #30  
BE Enthusiast
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Herne Bay, Kent, England.
Posts: 442
MartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud ofMartianTom has much to be proud of
Default Re: The changing seasons of my mind

It's funny but when I was writing the above, a newspaper story from 1993 kept springing to mind - was it a Tory MP who suffocated whilst starving himself of oxygen whilst trying to enhance orgasmic sensation?

Yes, it was - though it was 1994. Stephen Milligan was the party member for Eastleigh. He died of auto-erotic asphyxiation, combined with self-bondage and cross-dressing. He was engaged at the time to Julie Kirkbride, the current Tory MP for Bromsgrove - and who's now facing the axe after refusing to answer questions about dodgy expenses claims.

Don't ask me how I know this.
MartianTom is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.