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-   -   Benefits in the UK (London) (https://britishexpats.com/forum/moving-back-uk-61/benefits-uk-london-740956/)

MrBritUSA Dec 5th 2011 6:12 am

Benefits in the UK (London)
 
Ok, So being as clueless as I can be about the UK having been away so long. I am wondering if I will be entitled to any benefits when I return next year. I have been living in the US now for 28 years and I am now 44 years old/young. My house here in the Silicon Valley is under water and I would like to call it a day here in the US. I plan on finding work as soon as I can like most people returning home. I don’t want to be on the dole forever. That is if I even qualify. I also have read in the many threads that people use the term benefits but do not state what kind of benefits one may be entitled to. So would it be unemployment benefits. Housing benefits and how much would it be. I would like to know what I am facing when returning home. First steps to take etc.

Thanks for reading

Beedubya Dec 5th 2011 9:40 am

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by MrBritUSA (Post 9770312)
Ok, So being as clueless as I can be about the UK having been away so long. I am wondering if I will be entitled to any benefits when I return next year. I have been living in the US now for 28 years and I am now 44 years old/young. My house here in the Silicon Valley is under water and I would like to call it a day here in the US. I plan on finding work as soon as I can like most people returning home. I don’t want to be on the dole forever. That is if I even qualify. I also have read in the many threads that people use the term benefits but do not state what kind of benefits one may be entitled to. So would it be unemployment benefits. Housing benefits and how much would it be. I would like to know what I am facing when returning home. First steps to take etc.

Thanks for reading

Hi

Your post has had 60 views and no replies, so I don't think it is likely many people can answer your questions as we are all in different circumstances, I returned here 9 months ago after almost 30 years in Australia, so like me you will be on a HUGE learning curve.

You may find this the best site to help you with starting to do your homework.


http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Employment/index.htm

Jobseekers Allowance is £65.00 per week for a single person, so don't start booking your trips to Paris just yet. :o

Optimistic Pessimist Dec 5th 2011 4:57 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by MrBritUSA (Post 9770312)
Ok, So being as clueless as I can be about the UK having been away so long. I am wondering if I will be entitled to any benefits when I return next year. I have been living in the US now for 28 years and I am now 44 years old/young. My house here in the Silicon Valley is under water and I would like to call it a day here in the US. I plan on finding work as soon as I can like most people returning home. I don’t want to be on the dole forever. That is if I even qualify. I also have read in the many threads that people use the term benefits but do not state what kind of benefits one may be entitled to. So would it be unemployment benefits. Housing benefits and how much would it be. I would like to know what I am facing when returning home. First steps to take etc.

Thanks for reading

Hi Mr BritUSA

Firstly Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) falls into 2 types. One is Contribution based and requires you to have paid sufficient UK national insurance for the previous 2 tax years. It is only paid for 6 months.

The 2nd type of JSA is means-tested (ie they look at your other income) If you have capital over a certain amount (think its £16,000) u will not qualify for this.

If you are over the UK retirement age, then Pension Credit may be available.

Housing and Council Tax Benefit are also means-tested and have the capital limits.

The benefits will also require you to meet the 'habitual residence test'. You may not meet this immediately on arrival.

Have a look at thes websites:
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/MoneyTax...rk/DG_10018757.

http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/index/...y/benefits.htm

Hope that helps

BristolUK Dec 5th 2011 5:08 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 
Also search this forum for thread titles about JSA and Habitual residence. There are quite a few of them and they have good information including pitfalls and successes.

nun Dec 5th 2011 5:58 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Optimistic Pessimist (Post 9771307)

Firstly Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) falls into 2 types. One is Contribution based and requires you to have paid sufficient UK national insurance for the previous 2 tax years. It is only paid for 6 months.

Qualifying for Job Seekers allowance also depends on the Class of NI you have been paying. Class 2 voluntary NI payers are not eligible for job seekers allowance.

Lothianlad Dec 5th 2011 11:51 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 
Life for those of working age on any kind of out-of-work benefits in the UK is set to become a whole lot tougher within the next year or so.....Ian Duncan Smith, the Coalition Government (Conservative dominated) Work and Pensions Minister responsible for the administration and control of all welfare benefits, will soon be announcing all the new measures to be introduced by 2013.

This will incude the introduction of one single benefit to cover all out of work welfare payments of any kind - to be called the Universal Credit.

The conditions of entitlement will become much more stringently controlled and continued eligibility will depend on a variety of factors. One such may well include time limits of eligibility.

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Nl1/Newsroom/DG_191344

BristolUK Dec 6th 2011 1:36 am

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Lothianlad (Post 9772191)
Life for those of working age on any kind of out-of-work benefits in the UK is set to become a whole lot tougher within the next year or so.....

I'm not so sure things will actually prove to be much tougher. Very few of the other "tough" changes over decades actually proved to be tough.

Some of the changes introduced in 1988 cut back some allowances for a few people, but those already benefiting continued to gain from them.


This will incude the introduction of one single benefit to cover all out of work welfare payments of any kind - to be called the Universal Credit.
Rather like until 1988 when a similar single welfare benefit applied to unemployed, sick, lone parents, pensioners, carers ;)


The conditions of entitlement will become much more stringently controlled and continued eligibility will depend on a variety of factors. One such may well include time limits of eligibility.
It will take a tough government not to water down proposals by the time they hit the statute book. Thatcher didn't manage to be tough when it came to benefits legislation.

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Nl1/Newsroom/DG_191344


A new Enterprise Allowance will also be created to assist unemployed people starting to work for themselves.
That existed about 30 years ago too.


simplify the system, making it easier for people to understand, and easier and cheaper for staff to administer
Sadly, when they did that in 1988, simplification meant ending those fiddly, but useful, allowances for people who had real additional expenses for disabilities while giving extra allowances to people who didn't have such expenses.


improve work incentives
Bringing back the Unemployment Review Officer? Ooh, I'm coming over all nostalgic. :rofl:


smooth the transitions into and out of work
Bringing back entitlement to cover until first wages and the cost of fares until then?


reduce in-work poverty
Ah. Now that might be a benefit cut.

I remember when nu-labour increased benefit allowances for kids by a lot. It gave an awful lot of people on low incomes something like an extra £30 a week per child whether they were on Income Support or in work and on Housing Benefit.

Of course, because this increased the number of people qualifying for low income benefits, poverty levels officially increased (what with there being more on benefits ;)) even though it meant families were much better off as a result.

So, in reverse, they could cut people's income to make them worse off but, Hey Presto, poverty levels go down. :sneaky:


cut back on fraud and error
So they're going to increase staff pay to encourage recruitment and retention so staff can gain the necessary experience to do the job well? That'll be the day.

formula Dec 6th 2011 9:03 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Lothianlad (Post 9772191)
This will incude the introduction of one single benefit to cover all out of work welfare payments of any kind - to be called the Universal Credit.

Some in work benefits too, if they are income based i.e. Child Tax Credits and Working Tax Credits.


Originally Posted by Lothianlad (Post 9772191)
The conditions of entitlement will become much more stringently controlled and continued eligibility will depend on a variety of factors. One such may well include time limits of eligibility.

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Nl1/Newsroom/DG_191344

Much of the "continued eligibilty" has already started, along with other changes already in and a lot more changes to come, starting from next month.

If people take the time to read about Universal Credits, they may get a shock as it is the biggest overhaul since welfare payments began. All three political parties are supporting it.

roaringmouse Dec 7th 2011 2:04 am

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by formula (Post 9774127)
If people take the time to read about Universal Credits, they may get a shock as it is the biggest overhaul since welfare payments began. All three political parties are supporting it.

I think you might find that there's more than 3 political parties represented in the House of Commons?

alicet Jan 6th 2012 1:13 am

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 
Hi there - the big thing here is passing the habitual residence requirements - unfortunately no hard core guidance exists for what this means, but generally you have to show that you intend to stay here long term and that you have some connections/rationale for being here. Its a pretty tricky business best take advice from Citizens Advice Bureau and expect it not to be straightforward!

BristolUK Jan 6th 2012 10:49 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by alicet (Post 9823721)
Hi there - the big thing here is passing the habitual residence requirements - unfortunately no hard core guidance exists for what this means, but generally you have to show that you intend to stay here long term and that you have some connections/rationale for being here. Its a pretty tricky business best take advice from Citizens Advice Bureau and expect it not to be straightforward!

And the many threads about it I mentioned in post number 4 :)

(sorry...don't mean that to sound sarcastic)

markrod Feb 22nd 2012 1:12 am

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by MrBritUSA (Post 9770312)
Ok, So being as clueless as I can be about the UK having been away so long. I am wondering if I will be entitled to any benefits when I return next year. I have been living in the US now for 28 years and I am now 44 years old/young. My house here in the Silicon Valley is under water and I would like to call it a day here in the US. I plan on finding work as soon as I can like most people returning home. I don’t want to be on the dole forever. That is if I even qualify. I also have read in the many threads that people use the term benefits but do not state what kind of benefits one may be entitled to. So would it be unemployment benefits. Housing benefits and how much would it be. I would like to know what I am facing when returning home. First steps to take etc.

Thanks for reading

good luck i moved to the usa in 2001 to 2012 i got back to england on 10th of jan sign on 18th of jan they said i was entittle for job seekers aollows i been waiting for a cheque to come in the post i phone they upon 16th of feb they said they not going to give me any money becaise i not been in england long enough i was born here my mum,brothers,sister,cousins,nephew,nieces,were born here live here i work for the council fro 1987-2001 payed taxes they said i pass the right to resdice in the uk but fail the habitual test but i can still sign on to job seekers aollows what a load of bullshit mybe if i just came over on the bannna boat i would get houseing jsa benfits the lot ithey decide it on the 6th of feb i have got no leeter about it i had to ring they up to ask for a letter they did not know a letter was not sent out

BristolUK Feb 22nd 2012 4:10 am

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 
@markrod

I think I see why they ruled against you.:unsure:

markrod Feb 22nd 2012 8:33 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by BristolUK (Post 9914426)
@markrod

I think I see why they ruled against you.:unsure:

whats that then:confused:

paulpur Feb 22nd 2012 8:48 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 
Id suggest the you appeal the decision, you are within your rights to do so and have nothing to lose

markrod Feb 22nd 2012 8:56 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by paulpur (Post 9915627)
Id suggest the you appeal the decision, you are within your rights to do so and have nothing to lose

yes i am put i still not got a letter from they

Pollyana Feb 22nd 2012 9:36 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9915648)
yes i am put i still not got a letter from they

They may not actually understand what you are asking for, I had to read it several times. Perhaps approach it a little more clearly and logically - and without the swearing and abusive comments about migrants (of whom you were one when you moved to the US) ;)

markrod Feb 22nd 2012 11:02 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Pollyana (Post 9915713)
They may not actually understand what you are asking for, I had to read it several times. Perhaps approach it a little more clearly and logically - and without the swearing and abusive comments about migrants (of whom you were one when you moved to the US) ;)

they know what i was askong for because they said t can get jsa are you in england it anit abusive comments its the truth and yes i was a immegrate in the us but i work there british people should be put first

dunroving Feb 22nd 2012 11:14 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 
Hold up, I need to get some popcorn.

Mummy in the foothills Feb 22nd 2012 11:19 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by dunroving (Post 9915913)
Hold up, I need to get some popcorn.

:popcorn: There ya go. I'll share.

SanDiegogirl Feb 22nd 2012 11:35 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9915892)
they know what i was askong for because they said t can get jsa are you in england it anit abusive comments its the truth and yes i was a immegrate in the us but i work there british people should be put first

With the greatest of respect is this the best you can do with regards comprehension, spelling and laying out your arguments clearly?

How do you expect to get work if you write and/or speak like this?

BristolUK Feb 23rd 2012 4:30 am

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9915608)
whats that then:confused:

You said you were away for over ten years and a week after you're back you're off down the benefits office to make a claim. :eek: That doesn't look good.

Your post sounds a bit of a rant and the banana boat comment doesn't help. Perhaps you responded along those lines - maybe even with an indignant "but I'm British" response.

Much better to explain all those steps you took when you were moving back to the UK; that you closed your US bank accounts, wound up your housing situation over there, finished work, arranged for your belongings to be sent over, showed them your one way ticket etc etc and then also showed them all those things you had done to back up the idea that you have returned permanently; what you did for housing, how you were going to fund yourself, jobs applied for, why pick the area you were in...and anything else that builds a picture of a planned return to resettle in the UK.

formula Feb 23rd 2012 12:00 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by SanDiegogirl (Post 9915940)
With the greatest of respect is this the best you can do with regards comprehension, spelling and laying out your arguments clearly?

How do you expect to get work if you write and/or speak like this?

He/she wants benefits.

Pollyana Feb 23rd 2012 1:39 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9915892)
they know what i was askong for because they said t can get jsa are you in england it anit abusive comments its the truth and yes i was a immegrate in the us but i work there british people should be put first

If I could understand your post I might try to respond to it, as it is I think I'll join the :popcorn: brigade

:banghead:

Beedubya Feb 23rd 2012 1:46 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Mummy in the foothills (Post 9915920)
:popcorn: There ya go. I'll share.

Have you got any extra? :lol:

Pulls seat up............

Karrie72 Feb 23rd 2012 2:29 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 
Markrod, if you don't mind me asking...what type of work did you do while living in the USA?

SanDiegogirl Feb 23rd 2012 5:51 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by formula (Post 9916695)
He/she wants benefits.

Yes I understand he is looking to get benefits;however if he articulated more clearly he might be able to get a job :) which would be more beneficial to him.

markrod Feb 23rd 2012 6:34 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by SanDiegogirl (Post 9915940)
With the greatest of respect is this the best you can do with regards comprehension, spelling and laying out your arguments clearly?

How do you expect to get work if you write and/or speak like this?

with the greatest of respect i got a job interview and i spoke the bentfits people they said put ib appeal ror them to reconsider and has for the commnets about coming over on the banna boat i did not say that to they i not that draft its just a british term

markrod Feb 23rd 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by BristolUK (Post 9916263)
You said you were away for over ten years and a week after you're back you're off down the benefits office to make a claim. :eek: That doesn't look good.

Your post sounds a bit of a rant and the banana boat comment doesn't help. Perhaps you responded along those lines - maybe even with an indignant "but I'm British" response.

Much better to explain all those steps you took when you were moving back to the UK; that you closed your US bank accounts, wound up your housing situation over there, finished work, arranged for your belongings to be sent over, showed them your one way ticket etc etc and then also showed them all those things you had done to back up the idea that you have returned permanently; what you did for housing, how you were going to fund yourself, jobs applied for, why pick the area you were in...and anything else that builds a picture of a planned return to resettle in the UK.

i did not have a bank account in the usa the owner of the company i work for retired i was made homeless because my female friend i was with up and move to another part of the usa i was not intended to sign on when i got back to england i went straigt to my old company i worked which i worked 17 years for to see if there was any jobs there one of the reason i came back one of my family members is in poor health my mums two sisters died two years ago and my mum got no sibings my two brothers and sister and there kids who have worked all there lifes without signing on or claiming benifits i borrowed someones push bike to bike ten miles to look for a job and three miles to go to the jobcentere to look for a job they put me on a course which i bike three miles cause i got no money to get public transport

markrod Feb 23rd 2012 7:02 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Montfan72 (Post 9916937)
Markrod, if you don't mind me asking...what type of work did you do while living in the USA?

i was a part time labouor for min wage

markrod Feb 23rd 2012 7:11 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by SanDiegogirl (Post 9917325)
Yes I understand he is looking to get benefits;however if he articulated more clearly he might be able to get a job :) which would be more beneficial to him.

i applied to jobs that 25 miles away i applied to ten jobs i which i got a interview for one job i rang up for one job twice the guy said he get back to me he never did one job i went for i did not score enough points on the app
so i not sitting on my butt

markrod Feb 23rd 2012 7:19 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by formula (Post 9916695)
He/she wants benefits.

i am 44 years old he just needs some money to live on why i out of work and if that means apply for benifits well so be it

Sue Feb 23rd 2012 7:19 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9917466)
i was a part time labouor for min wage

Mark,

How did you end up coming the the US. Were you perhaps married to a US citizen or perhaps you came over as a minor with parents?

Karrie72 Feb 23rd 2012 7:20 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9917466)
i was a part time labouor for min wage

Well good luck finding something soon. At least you're in Brighton, a place very dear to my heart.

markrod Feb 23rd 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Sue (Post 9917498)
Mark,

How did you end up coming the the US. Were you perhaps married to a US citizen or perhaps you came over as a minor with parents?

no i met a us lady on the internet and wanted to see the usa was like i must say its is a beautful land but there no place like your homeland

markrod Feb 23rd 2012 7:27 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Montfan72 (Post 9917501)
Well good luck finding something soon. At least you're in Brighton, a place very dear to my heart.

well thank you for your hope in me

Sue Feb 23rd 2012 7:47 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9917511)
no i met a us lady on the internet and wanted to see the usa was like i must say its is a beautful land but there no place like your homeland

Forgive me for prying, but did you marry said lady? Were you here on a work visa? It's just you don't mention that, and if your stay in the US wasn't permanent e.g. you didn't have a green card etc, then may be that could be evidence of your temporary stay overseas and why you have now take up permanent residence back in the UK. In other words you couldn't stay in the US because you did not have the proper immigration paperwork? I say this because 11 years is a very long "visit" ;)

markrod Feb 23rd 2012 8:41 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by Sue (Post 9917539)
Forgive me for prying, but did you marry said lady? Were you here on a work visa? It's just you don't mention that, and if your stay in the US wasn't permanent e.g. you didn't have a green card etc, then may be that could be evidence of your temporary stay overseas and why you have now take up permanent residence back in the UK. In other words you couldn't stay in the US because you did not have the proper immigration paperwork? I say this because 11 years is a very long "visit" ;)

no i did not marry the lady and t dtd not have the right paperwork i over stay my visa and they would not deport me because i dtd not commited a serious enough crime i did not want to stay in a homelees shelter and why now i come back to my place of birth because one of my stepfather not in good health and i not going back to the usa i volutry deport myself because the usa would not kick me out what esle your want to know

Jerseygirl Feb 23rd 2012 9:23 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9917634)
no i did not marry the lady and t dtd not have the right paperwork i over stay my visa and they would not deport me because i dtd not commited a serious enough crime i did not want to stay in a homelees shelter and why now i come back to my place of birth because one of my stepfather not in good health and i not going back to the usa i volutry deport myself because the usa would not kick me out what esle your want to know


I don't think you could go back to the US now even if you wanted to....ever...not even for a holiday.

Good luck finding a job. At least all the cycling will keep you fit.

TheEmperorIsNaked Feb 23rd 2012 11:08 pm

Re: Benefits in the UK (London)
 

Originally Posted by markrod (Post 9917634)
no i did not marry the lady and t dtd not have the right paperwork i over stay my visa and they would not deport me because i dtd not commited a serious enough crime i did not want to stay in a homelees shelter and why now i come back to my place of birth because one of my stepfather not in good health and i not going back to the usa i volutry deport myself because the usa would not kick me out what esle your want to know

MarkR: you've been criticised for not writing very lucid posts. That's valid;-because if you make written application for jobs, that will go against you.

I notice that with BE,-if responding to a quote/post (not Quick Reply),-you have the option of a spell check. This is handy, it really is,-you should click on that and use it.

I've never had a problem with spelling, but I always spell check my posts using my own installed spell checker (ieSpell).

I don't agree with some of your comments, but agree you need a fighting chance to establish yourself back in the UK. Bad spelling errors send a bad message I promise you.

Give it a go; it won't turn you into an eloquent scribe, but it will help you. And for elsewhere-install a free spell check like ieS;-it will be really handy for you.


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