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Do you use what you have studied in your job?

Do you use what you have studied in your job?

Old Feb 2nd 2010, 5:09 am
  #31  
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Default Re: Do you use what you have studied in your job?

Originally Posted by Meow
And yet so many people take advice on the financial security of their family, tax issues and their life savings from someone who has done little more than sit a simple multi-choice exam, if that...
... or who has formed his/her opinions from extensive tabloid reading and" my cousin told me that..."
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Old Mar 7th 2010, 2:50 am
  #32  
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Default Re: Do you use what you have studied in your job?

My degree was completely relevant- I did fashion and now work as a designer- however from a course where there were 130 graduates only 6 work in the industry. In the Uk there are over 3000 graduates from fashion based courses and only 60 jobs a year at graduate level so undoubtedly the majority will end up in a different industry- and the relevance of a fashion degree to any other subject is pretty much zero- it's also a very expensive subject to study as you have to buy a lot of fabric and art materials (none of which are cheap), I can remember one of my lecturers telling the class she didn't think most of us had the talent to be doing a degree and they were only there to make up the numbers- turns out she was right!

My degree gave me the basics for the industry- I hadn't used a sewing machine before I did my foundation course so was still very much learning the basics throughout college, however I could have learnt everything I learnt at uni through evening courses and not ended up 17K in debt for it. However a lot of job requirements ask for a degree - god knows why! Unless you went to Central St Martins (which more or less gets you a job just for having that on your CV) I think the whole process is a bit of a waste of time, but you are pushed to go down that route through the education system.

First jobs in the fashion industry pay about 11-15K, so with debts to pay its hard to take those jobs. And if you haven't done any wortk placements its nigh on impossible to get an interview anyway so you have to have several months experience of unpaid work ontop of your degree- I always think the sandwich courses are the best for this.

There were several girls on my course who had never had a job before and had absolutely no idea what the real world was like, I am sure if they managed to get a job in the industry they wouldn't have stuck it out as its not the nicest industry for fresh meat- ie theres a lot of bitches, you have to do a huge amount of menial jobs and be spoken to like scum before you even stand a chance of designing anything! For me now, I employ kids with no experience or relevant degree, but I look for people that are enthusiastic, soak up information like a sponge and have a natural creative talent, you have to be very driven and passionate to work in the fashion industry and that is not something they can teach you.

So basically I agree with everyone else! For me it worked out well, but for the majority it doesn't, work experience is far more valuable than 3 years of building up debt. I blame it all on Tony Blair!

Kittycat

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Old Mar 7th 2010, 5:16 am
  #33  
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Default Re: Do you use what you have studied in your job?

from a course where there were 130 graduates only 6 work in the industry.

How do you know that? Surely neither you nor your university are still in touch with all of them?
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Old Mar 7th 2010, 7:04 am
  #34  
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Default Re: Do you use what you have studied in your job?

How do you know that? Surely neither you nor your university are still in touch with all of them?
Its a small industry and you cross paths quite regularly, and we were a tight course so yes I know what more or less everyone is doing. Facebook makes it very easy to stay in touch ad its an industry where networking is well worth while so I make it my business to know whos worth keeping I touch with!
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Old Apr 9th 2010, 10:18 am
  #35  
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Default Re: Do you use what you have studied in your job?

I don't have a degree: went straight into tv after a levels (oh ok I didn't, I fannied around for a bit working in shops and DREADFUL places very like "the office") and got properly trained by the BBC at their fabulous training centre in Evesham, where you got biffed off the course if you couldn't pass their exam at the end of every week. Four months of incredibly detailed, hands on learning following by attachments to various production departments. You did that for two years. You had to learn about every aspect of tv and radio production and I bloody loved it, even though I used to fall asleep in the radio sound classes. The centre is closed now and I don't think they even do this kind of intensive training any more which is a shame as things I learned there still help me today.

My brother went off and did a film and tv degree. At the end of his first year he showed me a collection of work by students and it was dire: they didn't understand very basic rules of eyeline, editing etc: things that I swear to god we learnt on our first day of visual production training. I ranted for a while and then he sorted himself work experience at a London tv co where he did so well
he basically worked there for the rest of his degree, only going back to give them work. It pissed them off but he was learning so much more while actually doing the job.

There's an urban myth in tv that there are more media graduates on the dole
or in other industries than actors, and I think there's supposed to be 80% of actors out of work at any one time. It's very possibly true. We get media grads through on our runner scheme. Many are great. Some are astonishingly inept. It belies belief that they can spend three years studying something and then not know really basic stuff. There are hundred of media degrees and they're really popular, mainly I think because people think it's an instant ride to fame and fortune.

I would rather employ a runner who showed me evidence of an ability to create something well made and entertaining, who showed an inherent flair for the job, than a media grad. I employ tv personnel who show a variety of experience, some journalistic nous, sociable natures, def no big egos and lots of common sense. I really don't care what degree they have. I secured work experience for a schoolkid who showed me a short film he'd made which was better shot and cut than many of the vt's my work colleagues trot out on a daily basis.

I think there are professions where a degree is essential and the subject studied is inherently linked to the resulting job. I don't think my profession is one of them.

I love the idea of recruiting a school leaver (maybe after they've done their fannying around) and then getting them properly trained, whether that's
through a degree or vocational training. It makes so much sense for so many professions.
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