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-   -   Can't abide Canadian word? (https://britishexpats.com/forum/maple-leaf-98/cant-abide-canadian-word-839422/)

Shard Jul 24th 2014 7:54 pm

Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Is there any Canadian word (or pronunciation) that you simply cannot abide and therefore consciously refuse? For example, do you insist on saying trousers instead of pants or petrol instead of gas? Not just words you dislike, but words you actively refuse to use.

orly Jul 24th 2014 8:05 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Eggplant.

Geordie Lass Jul 24th 2014 8:08 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Tom ay toe.

It's a tom arto.

I do use the phrase "Gong show" I do like that one. :lol:

Partially discharged Jul 24th 2014 8:53 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 

Originally Posted by Shard (Post 11346959)
Is there any Canadian word (or pronunciation) that you simply cannot abide and therefore consciously refuse? For example, do you insist on saying trousers instead of pants or petrol instead of gas? Not just words you dislike, but words you actively refuse to use.

Ain't gunna
Youse..as in 'hey youse guys'
I seen
tranny to describe a transmission
Tott-en-ham
KesWick
Wor-chi-stershire ...usually followed by 'sauce'

Gozit Jul 24th 2014 8:57 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Not so much the words but the spelling. I insist on using UK spellings for words like realise, where in the UK it is spelt realise but in North America it is spelt realize.

I'll occasionally use petrol instead of gas, there are more but I can't think of them at the moment. It depends on who i'm talking with. If its people from school that can't even speak normal Can/US English, I won't bother with the British words/spellings.

BristolUK Jul 24th 2014 9:06 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
I know it's of English origin but it's continued use is mainly North American.

I find it VERY hard to say Soccer

Back Yard is difficult. Yard just doesn't seem right for something with a lawn, flowers, trees etc.

I associate yard with scrapyard or just some concrete area.

rivingtonpike Jul 24th 2014 9:08 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Home Deeeeeepo

Paul_Shepherd Jul 24th 2014 9:22 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 

Originally Posted by BristolUK (Post 11347046)
I know it's of English origin but it's continued use is mainly North American.

I find it VERY hard to say Soccer

Back Yard is difficult. Yard just doesn't seem right for something with a lawn, flowers, trees etc.

I associate yard with scrapyard or just some concrete area.

I say "tom aa toe", soccer and vacation now..... but REFUSE out right to say Alu min um.. wrong wrong wrong wrong!! there is a "I" in there that the last yanks left out! "O reg ano" is wrong too and I wont say that! lol

Oink Jul 24th 2014 9:34 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Renasonce. :thumbdown:

Jingsamichty Jul 24th 2014 9:46 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Cru-SONT

Jingsamichty Jul 24th 2014 10:22 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Another one... I don't know if it's a Canadian thing or just a curse of the modern world, but I find the phrase "... that being said, ..." to be like nails on a blackboard.

Often, people don't even use it correctly. They say something, then say, "that being said, ..." and then proceed to say the same thing only slightly differently.

"It's going to be a lovely sunny day today here in northern Alberta. That being said, you won't be needing your umbrella today!"

Jingsamichty Jul 24th 2014 10:24 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
And newsreaders who say "this hour".

"Coming up this hour..." It's idiotic. Is it too much trouble to say, "Coming up in the next hour..." ?

Zoe Bell Jul 24th 2014 10:51 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
I despise the word panty-hose.
Bleurghh

pdarwin Jul 24th 2014 11:17 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Loonie; Twoonie

Also garaaage.

bc_guy Jul 24th 2014 11:17 pm

Re: Can't abide Canadian word?
 
Pronouncing the letter 'z' as "zed" sounds too odd for me to use in everyday conversation or listen to in math class. It's sort of distracting to listen to facts about general functions zed = f(x,y).


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