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-   -   Malaysia and Thailand (https://britishexpats.com/forum/malaysia-148/malaysia-thailand-464535/)

modhatter Jul 8th 2007 4:04 pm

Malaysia and Thailand
 
I know it is hot in both these places. But I was trying to get a handle on HOW HOT. I live in Southern Florida (USA), and our summers are pretty miserable. Does anyone have a basis of comparison between southern Florida and these places. I am told that Chung Mai (don't know correct spelling) is cooler. Anyone know how that area compares to Florida. Our summers are in the high 80's to low 90's with about 95% humidity.

I am interested in both places for possible retirement, but sure don't care for our summers here in Florida, so I am assuming it is not much better or possibly worse there all year round. Is that correct?

The summers here make it diffecult to really spend any time outside to enjoy the outdoors. Are there any cooler seasons there?

Also, I know Thailand recently tightened up on their visa requirements. Does anyone know the current requirements for someone under age 50 to get a longer visa. (thinkiing of my son) I know they upped the bank deposit considerably, but don't remember the current amount they now require.

Jockstar Jul 9th 2007 3:06 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 

I know it is hot in both these places. But I was trying to get a handle on HOW HOT.

Bangkok will get into the 30's and 40's. Chiang Mai is cooler. But still hot.

Some info on visas here.


Nomenclature for types of visa and permissions to stay for Thailand.

The basic entry/visa types of interest to most readers are listed below. For full information you may want to read the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Website

Initially, we will attempt to explain the differences between visas and ‘permission to stay’ stamps. These are often confused.

A visa is fundamentally a document (affixed into the passport) issued to a foreigner by the Thai government allowing said foreigner to travel to the Kingdom and normally be granted permission to stay for a prescribed period. Visas can only be obtained outside of the Kingdom from a Royal Thai Embassy/Consulate (usually). A visa has a validity period which denotes the period within which the visa may be used to apply for entry. The validity period is NOT the length of time you will be permitted to stay in the Kingdom using said visa.

A ‘permission to stay’ stamp is entered into your passport upon arrival into the Kingdom. Whatever visa you hold, you will always receive this stamp. It will include the date of entry and date when you MUST leave the Kingdom or make alternative arrangements. The ‘length of stay’ will be dependent on what type of visa one holds. Once inside the Kingdom, this stamp is sacrilege, your visa is now effectively irrelevant until you re-enter the country.

30 day entry stamp : for the majority of passport holders, this is a 'permission to stay 30 days' stamp only obtained (free of charge) at a port of entry into the Kingdom and is issued without the need for a visa. At the discretion of the immigration officer this may be extended for up to 7-15 days at an immigration office after which time the holder must leave the Kingdom. This is NOT a visa.

3 month validity, single entry tourist visa: pre-obtained at a Royal Thai Embassy/Consulate and will result in the holder obtaining a 60 day 'permission to stay' stamp upon entry. If required, this type of visa may be extended by 30 days at an immigration office, but after that time the holder must leave the country. After one entry, the visa is “used”.

6 month validity, 2 to 4 entry tourist visa: pre-obtained at a Royal Thai Embassy/Consulate and will result in the holder obtaining a 60 day 'permission to stay' stamp upon entry. If required, this type of visa may be extended by 30 days at an immigration office, but after that time the holder must leave the country. The holder may then return to the Kingdom and will obtain a second 60 day 'permission to stay' stamp which can also be extended as previous and then the holder must leave. After the stipulated number of entries the visa is “used”.

3 month validity, single entry non-immigrant visa: pre-obtained at a Royal Thai Embassy/Consulate and will result in the holder obtaining a 90 day 'permission to stay' stamp. This visa can be extended up to one year for specific reasons and with the required documentation (see 12 month extensions).

12 month validity, multi entry non-immigrant visa: pre-obtained at a Royal Thai Embassy/Consulate (usually) in your home country and will result in the holder obtaining a 90 day 'permission to stay' stamp upon entry. Each time the holder enters the Kingdom whilst the visa is valid, he/she will obtain a further 90 day 'permission to stay stamp'. Such visas can be issued for students/work/family etc. but normally require supporting documentation. This visa can also be extended up to one year for specific reasons and with the required documentation (see 12 month extensions).

Note: a 12 month validity, multi entry non-immigrant visa may also be obtained from some Royal Thai embassies outside your home country if you can provide evidence of your marriage to a Thai citizen (marriage certificate).

12 month extension to a non-immigrant visa: If you are holding a non-immigrant visa, you have the option of extending this by 12 months based on either retirement (50 years old or over) or support to a Thai citizen, work, education and such. This may only be accomplished at an immigration office inside the Kingdom and certain criteria have to be met. Such extensions consist of a stamp in your passport detailing “issue date” and “permitted to stay until” date.

Note 1: If you are residing in the Kingdom under an extension to a non-immigrant visa and wish to leave the Kingdom at any time, then you will need to obtain a “re-entry permit” to avoid losing the extension and the subsequent need to re-apply (i.e. applying for a new non-immigrant visa and then extension of stay).

Note 2: If you are residing in the Kingdom under an extension to a non-immigrant visa it is a legal requirement that the holder reports current address to an immigration office using form TM.47 (in person or by registered mail) every 90 days. Re-entering the Kingdom is the equivalent of a 90 day report.


The information given above is for guideline purposes only. Each individual’s circumstances may differ to such an extent that a definitive description of the procedures involved is virtually impossible to present. And, the final decision on visa application/issue or entry into the Kingdom will always be at the discretion of the immigration officer.


--------------------
If you need to more visa info. Then i suggest a Thai related forum for this.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/index.php?showforum=1

Malachi Jul 20th 2007 5:02 pm

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 
Regarding your question about the heat in Malaysia - you are asking the wrong question really, it is the humidity that is really the criteria you should be looking at.
I have lived in Malaya (Taiping, N.West Malaya), and Borneo and find that Borneo is much more comfortable, humidity wise. In Malaya it is a damp heat, very humid and even at 09.00 in the morning when it is fairly cool (ie: about 75/80 degrees Fahrenheit) you tend to have sweat running off your face and dripping off the ends of your shorts. In the heat of the day the temperature can go up to the high 90's or even higher so you tend to lose 10/12 pints of sweat each day. I am fairly certain that Thailand is the same as Malaya as well.
In Borneo it is a dry heat and you do not sweat so much. We had temperatures of up to 140 degrees Fahrenheit without rasing too much of a sweat (unless you're working or doing something energetic of course).

Having said all that mind you if I was lucky enough to have a choice of living in Malaysia I would choose Malaya any day. I love the heat and there is more life there - a lot more in the way of entertainment, views, travel etc etc (can't beat waking up every morning to the sound of the monkeys 'whooping' in the jungle).

Hope this helps.

Amazing Grace Jul 20th 2007 5:28 pm

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 
I lived in Kuala Lumpur for over four years and loved every minute of it. The weather is hot and steamy and is very high in the humidity most of the year round although it does get a little lower in early summer and then you can almost guarantee that every afternoon there will be a heavy shower with flash flooding sometimes and heavy thunderstorms but I would move back there in a flash (pardon the pun) if I was given the chance. It is called aclimatising and doesnt cause too much distress:thumbup::thumbup:

Malachi Jul 20th 2007 6:10 pm

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 
Hear! Hear - you obviously loved the country as much as I did:thumbsup:

pinoybill Jul 20th 2007 7:50 pm

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 
The Philippines is also worth a look.
There are lots of threads on B.E. extolling the virtues of all 3 countries ie Thailand ,Malaysia and Philippines.

There are pros and cons to all 3 places. I have no wish to start banging on that one is better than the other.I have never been to Thailand but have family in the Philippines courtesy of my wife and
we visited Malaysia last year on the way "home"and loved it.

The family dictates that we spend more time in the Philippines than other SE Asian countries but I have not been disappointed with any of the countries we have visited so far in the region and if the circumstances allowed would happily live in them.

I would agree that with the most recent posts, you will acclimatize.
I am just suggesting that if you have the opportunity check out the Philippines. You can travel around the country very cheaply and enjoy a very good lifestyle there on not a great deal of money.All other spots are only a few hours fying away.
With regards to the weather, there are areas that are in the hills that remain cool throughout the day and are close enough to the towns and cities.
Have a look at Bob Martins site on Davao.
He is an American expat living in Davao.
Davao is in the South in Mindanao.
It is the fruit basket of the Philippines.Outside of hurricane/typhoon zone.
Also because of the Mayor,the safest city in the Philippines.

The Philippine Govt also have a pretty good visa system if you wish to make a more permanent move.:thumbup:

katongkaren Jul 21st 2007 7:08 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 
You really need to take a holiday round the countries that you are interested in and see for yourself. No-one on the board can tell you what you'll like. As previous post said, all countries have their good and bad points and it's really down to what suits you. We have just chosen Thailand for retirement at the end of the year for various reasons but Malaysia has it's good points and Philippines too - and there are probably others.

As to the heat/humidity, it can vary around the region and vary at different times of the year. As someone pointed out Chiang Mai in Northern Thailand can be cooler, Bangkok I hear is usually hot. I think different parts of Malaysia have varying temperatures/humidity too. Puzzled about the posting about Borneo being less humid. I went to Kuching, Sarawak in Borneo last August and it was as humid as you'll get.

cool_nich Jul 21st 2007 2:21 pm

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 

Originally Posted by modhatter (Post 5026937)
I know it is hot in both these places. But I was trying to get a handle on HOW HOT. I live in Southern Florida (USA), and our summers are pretty miserable. Does anyone have a basis of comparison between southern Florida and these places. I am told that Chung Mai (don't know correct spelling) is cooler. Anyone know how that area compares to Florida. Our summers are in the high 80's to low 90's with about 95% humidity.

I am interested in both places for possible retirement, but sure don't care for our summers here in Florida, so I am assuming it is not much better or possibly worse there all year round. Is that correct?

The summers here make it diffecult to really spend any time outside to enjoy the outdoors. Are there any cooler seasons there?

Also, I know Thailand recently tightened up on their visa requirements. Does anyone know the current requirements for someone under age 50 to get a longer visa. (thinkiing of my son) I know they upped the bank deposit considerably, but don't remember the current amount they now require.

Maybe better u can choose Indonesia?

katongkaren Jul 22nd 2007 5:51 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 
oh, terrific idea :D

cool_nich Jul 22nd 2007 8:45 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 

Originally Posted by katongkaren (Post 5089158)
oh, terrific idea :D

have u tried it before?

katongkaren Jul 24th 2007 3:31 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 
Husband has been there (Indonesia) many times and has told me all about it.

cool_nich Jul 24th 2007 11:18 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 

Originally Posted by katongkaren (Post 5097051)
Husband has been there (Indonesia) many times and has told me all about it.

ic. where ru live now? why u didnt follow ur husband?

ex reg Jul 25th 2007 1:42 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 

Originally Posted by katongkaren (Post 5085854)
I went to Kuching, Sarawak in Borneo last August and it was as humid as you'll get.

You want humidity.

Then try Muscat.

That is as humid as you can get.

This post was made by the "whatever you can do I can do better" poster of the year:eek::D

katongkaren Jul 25th 2007 6:58 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 
To the above two postings - Nich, I currently live in Singapore with my husband but we'll be retiring to Thailand at the end of the year. (We are old!)

To the other posting above - I have been to Muscat Oman (is this where you mean?) on business about 10 times and it's always been hot and dry when I've been there but haven't been there for about 2 years so maybe there's been some global warming change there or something. There was some freak cyclone there recently wasn't there? (World weather is upside down.)

Don't think any of this is relevant or helpful to the original posting though.

ex reg Jul 25th 2007 8:08 am

Re: Malaysia and Thailand
 

Originally Posted by katongkaren (Post 5102616)
To the above two postings - Nich, I currently live in Singapore with my husband but we'll be retiring to Thailand at the end of the year. (We are old!)

To the other posting above - I have been to Muscat Oman (is this where you mean?) on business about 10 times and it's always been hot and dry when I've been there but haven't been there for about 2 years so maybe there's been some global warming change there or something. There was some freak cyclone there recently wasn't there? (World weather is upside down.)

Don't think any of this is relevant or helpful to the original posting though.

I don't believe it's ever been hot and dry in Muscat.
Ever.
Cyclones are not unusual in Oman.


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