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-   -   WORDS (https://britishexpats.com/forum/lounge-7/words-932346/)

el collado kid Apr 23rd 2020 1:50 pm

WORDS
 
WORDS?
give us a word that we do not know i have just learnt vicissitudes thanks LIW. What have you all got for me?

BristolUK Apr 23rd 2020 2:04 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by el collado kid (Post 12843082)
WORDS?
give us a word that we do not know i have just learnt vicissitudes thanks LIW. What have you all got for me?

How about 'mote' in the same thread that one came from? That was a new one for me. :nod:

I reckon there's a word in the guardian I have to look up at least once a week, although sometimes it's more to remind myself because it's so rare, rather than I don't recognise it.

el collado kid Apr 23rd 2020 2:21 pm

Re: WORDS
 
a tiny piece of a substance; a speck.And it's 11.25 AM in moncton near the USA border:eek:

Gordon Barlow Apr 23rd 2020 2:27 pm

Re: WORDS
 
This seems as good a place as any to post a link to Spike Milligan's interview as a Word Pronouncer - from one of the Goon Shows. Not everybody's cup of tea, Spike Milligan's concept of humour, but it was good while it lasted. "Perspicacity, mate", I said.

el collado kid Apr 23rd 2020 2:37 pm

Re: WORDS
 
the quality of having a ready insight into things; shrewdness.There you are Gordon and it's 9.40am there

Pulaski Apr 23rd 2020 2:51 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by BristolUK (Post 12843093)
How about 'mote' in the same thread that one came from? That was a new one for me. ... .

That is a revealing admission. :sneaky:

In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.

Oakvillian Apr 23rd 2020 6:22 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by BristolUK (Post 12843093)
How about 'mote' in the same thread that one came from? That was a new one for me. :nod:

I reckon there's a word in the guardian I have to look up at least once a week, although sometimes it's more to remind myself because it's so rare, rather than I don't recognise it.


Originally Posted by Pulaski (Post 12843126)
That is a revealing admission. :sneaky:

Guilty as charged - that's the benefits of an Anglican education. Although I referenced "plank" instead of "beam" to compare to the mote... seems to be a confused mixture of King James and the RSV... and now I can't believe I've wasted spent 5 minutes looking that up!

robin1234 Apr 23rd 2020 6:46 pm

Re: WORDS
 
I always think of mote & bailey but I never knew which was which.

Turns out it is motte!

Leslie Apr 23rd 2020 6:59 pm

Re: WORDS
 
Seminiferous!

caretaker Apr 23rd 2020 7:13 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Leslie (Post 12843242)
Seminiferous!

I had to look it up, but I'm ready now if it ever hits trivia.

Leslie Apr 23rd 2020 8:46 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by caretaker (Post 12843243)
I had to look it up, but I'm ready now if it ever hits trivia.

There was an incident on BE years ago where somebody called somebody else a seminiferous tubule. It may have even won insult of the year. :lol:

Pulaski Apr 23rd 2020 8:49 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Leslie (Post 12843242)
Seminiferous!

If we start down the path of anatomy and scientific terminology in general, then there's almost unlimited scope for this thread. :unsure:

Sugarmooma Apr 24th 2020 3:45 am

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Leslie (Post 12843273)
There was an incident on BE years ago where somebody called somebody else a seminiferous tubule. It may have even won insult of the year. :lol:

Is the person still on BE that was called a seminiferous tubule? I don't remember this incident.

Red Eric Apr 24th 2020 7:34 am

Re: WORDS
 
Boustrophedon.

el collado kid Apr 24th 2020 7:40 am

Re: WORDS
 
interlinguistic I found this,you might have trouble keeping your teeth in when you say it.I found it hard to pronounce let a lone use it,and if you did use this word would anyone understand?

el collado kid Apr 24th 2020 7:47 am

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Red Eric (Post 12843408)
Boustrophedon.

Good word. I know now what my writing style is boustrophedon.I thought i was dyslexic

robin1234 Apr 24th 2020 8:33 am

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by el collado kid (Post 12843410)
Good word. I know now what my writing style is boustrophedon.I thought i was dyslexic

So long as it’s not otiose, you’re good.

el collado kid Apr 24th 2020 8:37 am

Re: WORDS
 
"there were occasions when I felt my efforts were rather otiose"

caretaker Apr 24th 2020 8:55 am

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by el collado kid (Post 12843432)
"there were occasions when I felt my efforts were rather otiose"

it's a new one for me. I'd try to define it as well, but that would be redundant.

macliam Apr 24th 2020 11:29 am

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by caretaker (Post 12843438)
it's a new one for me. I'd try to define it as well, but that would be redundant.

Hardly seems worth defining words when american business will always find new uses....... as in using leverage as a verb.

Lion in Winter Apr 24th 2020 1:33 pm

Re: WORDS
 
SWIMS. If you turn it upside down and back to front, it still says SWIMS. My OH pointed this out to me last night.

Are there any other words like this?

el collado kid Apr 24th 2020 1:53 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Lion in Winter (Post 12843546)
SWIMS. If you turn it upside down and back to front, it still says SWIMS. My OH pointed this out to me last night.

Are there any other words like this?

OXO

Leslie Apr 24th 2020 3:27 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Sugarmooma (Post 12843358)
Is the person still on BE that was called a seminiferous tubule? I don't remember this incident.

I think this all happened in the Sand Pit back when it was hotbed of infidelity and wife swapping ;) . . . .

https://britishexpats.com/forum/take...thread-742656/

Sugarmooma Apr 24th 2020 3:52 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Leslie (Post 12843615)
I think this all happened in the Sand Pit back when it was hotbed of infidelity and wife swapping ;) . . . .

https://britishexpats.com/forum/take...thread-742656/


I guess I didn't venture enough around the world of BE! :lol:

Oakvillian Apr 24th 2020 3:55 pm

Re: WORDS
 
Bookkeeper has three sets of double letters in a row.
If a bookkeeper's assistant could be called a subbookkeeper, that'd be four sets of double letters.

caretaker Apr 24th 2020 3:58 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Sugarmooma (Post 12843626)
I guess I didn't venture enough around the world of BE! :lol:

Who knows what's in all those sub-forums? There's no guarantee they're safe, and just the name Sand Pit, really, makes me think blazing hot, full of flies, probably smells of urine.. Nope, too foreign.

Oakvillian Apr 24th 2020 4:00 pm

Re: WORDS
 
And if we're into bizarre word factoids, rather than bizarre words themselves, then both "catchphrase" and "latchstring" (a wire or string that passes through a gate or door allowing a latch to be opened from the "wrong" side) have six consonants in a row. There are some words with seven consonants (e.g. rhythms, strychnine) but each includes a "y" acting as a pseudo-vowel so they don't really count.

Oakvillian Apr 24th 2020 4:08 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Lion in Winter (Post 12843546)
SWIMS. If you turn it upside down and back to front, it still says SWIMS. My OH pointed this out to me last night.

Are there any other words like this?

there are a few in lower case. pod, suns and dollop are ones that I know.

These words are called ambigrams. There are all sorts of clever calligraphic tricks that can make many words into ambigrams. There's a guy called John Langdon who created book-cover art for some of Dan Brown's (dreadful) novels, whose website is worth a look Ambigrams, Logos, & Word Art. | John Langdon | Ambigrams, Logos, & Word Art.

Lion in Winter Apr 24th 2020 4:31 pm

Re: WORDS
 
"Cleave" has two meanings, one of which is the opposite of the other. You can cleave to someone (stick like glue), or it can mean splitting something.

Lion in Winter Apr 24th 2020 4:32 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Oakvillian (Post 12843640)
there are a few in lower case. pod, suns and dollop are ones that I know.

These words are called ambigrams. There are all sorts of clever calligraphic tricks that can make many words into ambigrams. There's a guy called John Langdon who created book-cover art for some of Dan Brown's (dreadful) novels, whose website is worth a look Ambigrams, Logos, & Word Art. | John Langdon | Ambigrams, Logos, & Word Art.


That webpage gave me vertigo.

Oakvillian Apr 24th 2020 4:39 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Lion in Winter (Post 12843651)
"Cleave" has two meanings, one of which is the opposite of the other. You can cleave to someone (stick like glue), or it can mean splitting something.

Ooh. I love these. Auto-antonyms (or "contronyms").

Fast ... moving quickly (running fast) or not moving at all (stand fast).
Oversight... as in, the issue was caused by lack of oversight of the machine. This was clearly an oversight on the part of the operator.
Sanction... if you take action that I have not sanctioned, I will sanction you.

Unlockable is not quite the opposite of itself, but it can mean both "can be unlocked" and "cannot be locked."

Lion in Winter Apr 24th 2020 5:15 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Oakvillian (Post 12843655)
Ooh. I love these. Auto-antonyms (or "contronyms").

Fast ... moving quickly (running fast) or not moving at all (stand fast).
Oversight... as in, the issue was caused by lack of oversight of the machine. This was clearly an oversight on the part of the operator.
Sanction... if you take action that I have not sanctioned, I will sanction you.

Unlockable is not quite the opposite of itself, but it can mean both "can be unlocked" and "cannot be locked."


Isn't language great? Although what evolutionary imperative made it so perverse is anyone's guess. Selecting for poets?


Pulaski Apr 24th 2020 8:57 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Lion in Winter (Post 12843673)
Isn't language great? Although what evolutionary imperative made it so perverse is anyone's guess. Selecting for poets?

This is a common topic of conversation over dinner in the Pulaski household, and it never ceases to amaze me how many English words have two, or more, distinct meanings, which is all the more astounding when you take into account that English has, so many words. I once read, that English has 60% more words than French, and 40% more words than German - the relative values appear to be correct, but there are, I now realize a number of different ways to count the number of words in each language.

Given this, I am in awe of people who attain great fluency in English as a second language, that you don't only need to have a large vocabulary, but also grasp the context of what you are reading/ being told to determine which meaning of a word is the intended one. .....With examples such as Pitch - tar, tone/ note, steepness, throw, sports ground, sales presentation, & fall, and cast: throw, make using a mold, assign a role to an actor, to add up, & a colour modification/ tint.

And while researching this post, I came across a word I have never seen before - polysemy/ polysemous - to have several meanings, such as a word. :thumbsup:

macliam Apr 24th 2020 9:13 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Pulaski (Post 12843767)
This is a common topic of conversation over dinner in the Pulaski household, and it never ceases to amaze me how many English words have two, or more, distinct meanings, which is all the more astounding when you take into account that English has, so many words. I once read, that English has 60% more words than French, and 40% more words than German - the relative values appear to be correct, but there are, I now realize a number of different ways to count the number of words in each language.

Given this, I am in awe of people who attain great fluency in English as a second language, that you don't only need to have a large vocabulary, but also grasp the context of what you are reading/ being told to determine which meaning of a word is the intended one. .....With examples such as Pitch - tar, tone/ note, steepness, throw, sports ground, sales presentation, & fall, and cast: throw, make using a mold, assign a role to an actor, to add up, & a colour modification/ tint.

And while researching this post, I came across a word I have never seen before - polysemy/ polysemous - a word with several meanings. :thumbsup:

All languages have many words for the same thing and words with several meanings. Irish has three major dialects (plus a national "standard"). The little I retain is Munster Irish, from the South-West..... when I see Ulster Irish (from Donegal), not only is the pronunciation very different, but there are entirely different ways to say basic concepts, like asking how you are or telling the time and other common phrases differ slightly too, because they each use a different (valid) way to say the same thing. Just as in English, you can say "I'm obliged to you" rather than "Thank you".... and in Portuguese the former becomes "Obrigado" and the primary way to say thanks in that language.

Pulaski Apr 24th 2020 9:25 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by macliam (Post 12843770)
All languages have many words for the same thing and words with several meanings. .....

Agreed, they do, but English seems to have excelled in pulling in new words from multiple different languages, and molding them into English, notably from French, Latin, and Greek, which have then been grafted on to the Anglo-Saxon root of English, meaning that it is virtually guaranteed that there will be at least two, and often three or more synonyms for most common words (look in a thesaurus and 6-10 words with very close meanings are not uncommon), though often with enough of a twist that they aren't precise synonyms, they have subtly distinct meanings.

caretaker Apr 24th 2020 9:26 pm

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by Pulaski (Post 12843767)
:thumbsup:

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/british...58a4a09f86.jpg


sid nv Apr 25th 2020 5:02 am

Re: WORDS
 
No need to get into a collieshangie.

el collado kid Apr 25th 2020 7:10 am

Re: WORDS
 
My favourite Spanish word is tranquilo .Calm,relax,quiet

el collado kid Apr 25th 2020 7:12 am

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by sid nv (Post 12843884)
No need to get into a collieshangie.

You could argue the point,a few on BE often do

Red Eric Apr 25th 2020 7:22 am

Re: WORDS
 

Originally Posted by el collado kid (Post 12843897)
My favourite Spanish word is tranquilo .Calm,relax,quiet

Oooh - a polyglot! :thumbup:


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