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English idiom around the world

English idiom around the world

Old May 15th 2019, 12:58 pm
  #31  
 
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Default Re: English idiom around the world

Originally Posted by Gordon Barlow View Post
In an article on Australian English I found the word "yob/yobbo". But I don't recall ever hearing or using this in my homeland (Queensland), and I encountered it first in London. So I've always thought of it as a home-grown English word. What's the consensus opinion?
British dictionaries (possibly unsurprisingly) seem to think that it's 19th century British origin, coming from a back slang version of "boy", or "oh boy",
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Old May 15th 2019, 2:07 pm
  #32  
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Default Re: English idiom around the world

Originally Posted by Gordon Barlow View Post
In an article on Australian English I found the word "yob/yobbo".




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Old Jun 3rd 2019, 2:23 am
  #33  
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Default Re: English idiom around the world

​Setting:
A booth in a premium sandwich restaurant in SW Virginia. Pulaski has just finished his turkey, bacon and guacamole sandwich.

​​​​​​Cast:
Pulaski: wise but modest British polymath
Mrs P: American graduate in English and Old English
Little Miss P: Observer, sitting across the table from Pulaski and Mrs P

Pukaski: My sandwich wasn't bad, but the similar one I used to get from Quiznos was better. This one had a cold and moist wodge of thin sliced turkey that was unappetizing.

Mrs P: I think you meant "wedge".

Pulaski: No I didn't, I meant "wodge".

Mrs P: [With great confidence] Wodge isn't a word!

Pulaski: [With greater confidence] Oh yes it is!

Mrs P: Prove it!

Little Miss P: [Laughs]

Pulaski: [Consults Google, via the restaurant wifI, as the is no cell signal this far out in the backwoods] This is what Google says: "Definition of wodge. chiefly British: a bulky mass or chunk : lump, wad."

[Much laughter ensues.]

M​​​​rs P: More that twenty years after we first met, I thought I had heard all your unusual British words and phrases!

Last edited by Pulaski; Jun 3rd 2019 at 2:29 am.
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Old Jun 3rd 2019, 2:36 am
  #34  
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Default Re: English idiom around the world

Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
​Setting:
A booth in a premium sandwich restaurant in SW Virginia. Pulaski has just finished his turkey, bacon and guacamole sandwich.

​​​​​​Cast:
Pulaski: wise but modest British polymath
Mrs P: American graduate in English and Old English
Little Miss P: Observer, sitting across the table from Pulaski and Mrs P

Pukaski: My sandwich wasn't bad, but the similar one I used to get from Quiznos was better. This one had a cold and moist wodge of thin sliced turkey that was unappetizing.

Mrs P: I think you meant "wedge".

Pulaski: No I didn't, I meant "wodge".

Mrs P: [With great confidence] Wodge isn't a word!

Pulaski: [With greater confidence] Oh yes it is!

Mrs P: Prove it!

Little Miss P: [Laughs]

Pulaski: [Consults Google, via the restaurant wifI, as the is no cell signal this far out in the backwoods] This is what Google says: "Definition of wodge. chiefly British: a bulky mass or chunk : lump, wad."

[Much laughter ensues.]

M​​​​rs P: More that twenty years after we first met, I thought I had heard all your unusual British words and phrases!
Welease Wodger.
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Old Jun 3rd 2019, 2:46 am
  #35  
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Default Re: English idiom around the world

I would argue that a wodge is rather less disciplined than a wedge - less well defined. A wedge has a shape, surely: like those things you stick (wedge!) under a door to stop it rattling; a wodge is basically amorphous - like, well, a chunk of cold turkey chucked on your plate in a cheap restaurant.
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Old Jun 8th 2019, 12:34 pm
  #36  
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Default Re: English idiom around the world

Originally Posted by zzrmark View Post
You'm grockles be 'bout as welcome as they'm Orcs.
Grockle is a standard southwest term for a tourist..... except in Cornwall. There they are Emmets, or ants, due to their red colour and the long nose-to-tail queues they form on the roads into the county during Summer.

Around Bristol, Bath and North-west Somerset a lot of dialect words exist - as well as the famous accents ("Malarial areals of Africal or "Vertoot et Industrial" for Bristol, "Casn't coupie down by there" or "Bist goin' down town saffnoon" for the Bad Onions. A lot of the dialect retains germanic traits, ("Thee cast", Thee casn't", "Thee bist", "Thee bisn't") or just localised nonsense "Them daps are the kiddies, my cocker!"

As Limerick has it's own vocabulary with Hiberno-English, it was easy to go with the flow in the West Country. Gert lush.

Last edited by macliam; Jun 8th 2019 at 12:55 pm.
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