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British Terminology

British Terminology

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Old Sep 28th 2017, 1:26 pm
  #61  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Closely related (etymologically) to soccer is rugger. In the US, they use the word "rugger" to mean "a rugby player." I don't think that's used in Britain, is it?

Then, Americans use the term "high tea" when they mean "afternoon tea," in the sense of tea at Claridges that costs £28 and includes finger sandwiches and petit fours. In fact high tea is something quite different.
Think it's around £40 now !
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 3:40 pm
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Default Re: British Terminology

This may just be regional jargon but we called people"my lover"
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 3:50 pm
  #63  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by dougal03 View Post
This may just be regional jargon but we called people"my lover"
Are you from Newfoundland?
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 4:34 pm
  #64  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Shard View Post
Think it's around £40 now !
I had 'tea' at the Ritz in 2001. I wished they advertised the possibility of seconds for the sandwiches as when they brought more I'd already had some cake after the first round.

Quite sickly eating sandwiches, cakes and then sandwiches again. Mind you, the 7 cups of Assam didn't help.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 5:40 pm
  #65  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by dougal03 View Post
This may just be regional jargon but we called people"my lover"
Is that Devon? I remember when I lived down there, men would use "lover" to address people, the way you hear "dear" in other places..
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 8:47 pm
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by robin1234 View Post
Is that Devon? I remember when I lived down there, men would use "lover" to address people, the way you hear "dear" in other places..
Agreed. It sounds stereotypical West Country to my ears. Men call other men 'love' in Sheffield which was a bit of a shock when I first arrived. 'Duck' as a term of affection is universal there as well.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 9:41 pm
  #67  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by BritInParis View Post
Agreed. It sounds stereotypical West Country to my ears. Men call other men 'love' in Sheffield which was a bit of a shock when I first arrived. .....
I remember an artic truck driver from Yorkshire delivered a load one day to the warehouse in Gloucester where I used to work. I was unloading his trailer and he wandered into the warehouse to find out out much longer I was going to be before he could leave. He greeted me with a big grin a friendly "How's it going, love?" Coming from Sheffield myself it wasn't concerning to me, but I suspect that my colleagues in the warehouse might have been taken-a-back.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 10:12 pm
  #68  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Pulaski View Post
So explain "valley floor"!
There's always one, and it's usually you.

Perhaps the nominal ceiling was the wrong idea. Perhaps it's the idea of the floor being enclosed - a valley floor would have 'walls' up the side, ocean floor is enclosed in water, forest floor has tree walls.

So there.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 10:56 pm
  #69  
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Default Re: British Terminology

The guy that I first heard say it was from Leeds, if that helps.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 10:58 pm
  #70  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Nowhere better to post this than here.
Is blacktop an Americanism, or do Brits say it too?
I have never heard it before today.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 11:01 pm
  #71  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Dreamy View Post
There's always one, and it's usually you.

Perhaps the nominal ceiling was the wrong idea. Perhaps it's the idea of the floor being enclosed - a valley floor would have 'walls' up the side, ocean floor is enclosed in water, forest floor has tree walls.

So there.
Could also be a topographic term, one that is used to describe an area as a unit rather than the personal experience of it. We don't usually refer to the ocean floor in the first person, it's the seabed.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 11:03 pm
  #72  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Shard View Post
Could also be a topographic term, one that is used to describe an area as a unit rather than the personal experience of it. We don't usually refer to the ocean floor in the first person, it's the seabed.
Good point, or to draw attention to the ecosystem, a floor when being discussed in terms of the overall system involved.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 11:26 pm
  #73  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by kimilseung View Post
Good point, or to draw attention to the ecosystem, a floor when being discussed in terms of the overall system involved.
I like the ecosystem idea, makes sense.
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Old Sep 28th 2017, 11:28 pm
  #74  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by Dreamy View Post
There's always one, and it's usually you. ....
Me? .....
..... Perhaps the nominal ceiling was the wrong idea. Perhaps it's the idea of the floor being enclosed - a valley floor would have 'walls' up the side, ocean floor is enclosed in water, forest floor has tree walls.

So there.
Of course.
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Old Sep 29th 2017, 3:41 am
  #75  
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Default Re: British Terminology

Originally Posted by BristolUK View Post
Quite right too. It's an abomination.

Many Brits too. One of our sports teachers at school back in the 60s used to say it, but then he was Welsh and a rugby fan who called the 15 man game football, which seemed to be quite common.
My Welsh uncle always called English football soccer, and that was back in the 1950s. He never missed a England vs Wales match at Twickenham
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