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-   -   Computer Support in West Ireland (https://britishexpats.com/forum/information-technology-78/computer-support-west-ireland-321211/)

crazydaisy Aug 21st 2005 3:17 am

Computer Support in West Ireland
 
Hi all - we're planning a move to Shannon/Limerick, Galway or Cork and just want to get a feel from anyone who has made the plunge and how did job hunting go (ie did it take days, weeks or months to find work? Did you find work before arriving etc.) We've heard that there is a skills shortage and we're just wondering if that skills shortage is generally at entry level or supervisory/mid management level in the network support area? Hubby has IBM experience and Customer Service Management skills but would prefer not to go the route of low paid call centres work (having been there and done that!) If anyone has any knowledge of that field and those areas of Ireland (we have visited on many occassion so not looking from behind tinted spectacles!) then we 'd be interested in hearing from ya!

Many thanks guys (and gals!)

Daisy :)

jgombos Aug 26th 2005 2:17 am

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 
Sorry I have more questions than information.. I heard that Ireland was the next upcoming silicon valley for Western Europe.. then a couple years later I heard the IT industry collapsed back to it's original very low level (where Irish nationals were actually leaving Ireland it was so bad).

But that's all heresay and rumor from three years ago. I'd like to know what the rumors are today. :D

BlueScottyGirl Nov 8th 2005 9:43 am

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by jgombos
Sorry I have more questions than information.. I heard that Ireland was the next upcoming silicon valley for Western Europe.. then a couple years later I heard the IT industry collapsed back to it's original very low level (where Irish nationals were actually leaving Ireland it was so bad).

But that's all heresay and rumor from three years ago. I'd like to know what the rumors are today. :D


I'll need to go and find you two since this thread is quiet old now. Anyway, my hubby works in IT and he's of the opinion that Ireland IS the new IT capital of the west.

The jobs are there, although I don't know how someone NOT from the EU would fare. Be careful too if you're planning to go down the contracting route, the agencies here don't work like agencies anywhere else in the world :scared:

More if you need it. Good luck

BSG

jgombos Jan 9th 2006 1:36 am

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by BlueScottyGirl
I'll need to go and find you two since this thread is quiet old now. Anyway, my hubby works in IT and he's of the opinion that Ireland IS the new IT capital of the west.

The jobs are there, although I don't know how someone NOT from the EU would fare. Be careful too if you're planning to go down the contracting route, the agencies here don't work like agencies anywhere else in the world :scared:

More if you need it. Good luck

BSG

In the U.S., contractors are much better off than directs. But I've heard that's pretty much specific to the U.S., and that IT contractors get screwed elsewhere - very little job security, no benefits, and less pay. I'm not sure how accurate that is, but I am thinking working direct is better in the EU.

I also heard that in Ireland (around 2000) IT jobs were plentiful and very easy to get, but that pay was still low. However I'm not sure why high demand wouldn't automatically entail high pay. What does a mid-career s/w engineer make in Ireland with respect to per capita?

crazydaisy Jan 9th 2006 3:37 am

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by jgombos
In the U.S., contractors are much better off than directs. But I've heard that's pretty much specific to the U.S., and that IT contractors get screwed elsewhere - very little job security, no benefits, and less pay. I'm not sure how accurate that is, but I am thinking working direct is better in the EU.

I also heard that in Ireland (around 2000) IT jobs were plentiful and very easy to get, but that pay was still low. However I'm not sure why high demand wouldn't automatically entail high pay. What does a mid-career s/w engineer make in Ireland with respect to per capita?

I don't know if this is helpful. It is a salary guide for Ireland IT contract work in 2006 at http://www.irishjobs.ie/resource_cen...ey.asp?SID=227

Also the site above has a searchable database to see what other jobs are out there in different regions, to get a feel for where the jobs are and what sort of qualifications they are looking for. After that http://www.daft.ie is a great website to look up what sort of accomodation you can get for the money being offered in that area.

Hope that's a help!

Cheers, daisy :)

jgombos Jan 9th 2006 11:32 pm

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by crazydaisy
I don't know if this is helpful. It is a salary guide for Ireland IT contract work in 2006 at http://www.irishjobs.ie/resource_cen...ey.asp?SID=227

Thanks for the links. That's very encouraging! It seems mid-career contractors get around 3000 USD/week in Ireland, which is about 170% of the rate here in the US. Then comparing Cork to Columbus on homefair, I can see that I need to make 40% more in Cork.. so that's an overall 30% gain... so there's enough buffer there that even if the numbers are off a bit, it's probably still favorable to leave the US for Ireland.

I'll have to think more seriously about finding an ADA job in Ireland. Although ADA may not exist over there.

crazydaisy Jan 10th 2006 2:31 am

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by jgombos
Thanks for the links. That's very encouraging! It seems mid-career contractors get around 3000 USD/week in Ireland, which is about 170% of the rate here in the US. Then comparing Cork to Columbus on homefair, I can see that I need to make 40% more in Cork.. so that's an overall 30% gain... so there's enough buffer there that even if the numbers are off a bit, it's probably still favorable to leave the US for Ireland.

I'll have to think more seriously about finding an ADA job in Ireland. Although ADA may not exist over there.

I've found that when comparing jobs from area to area that Cork (compared to Galway and Limerick say) does seem to have more jobs available. The income tax rates at 20% are pretty good until you reach the standard cut off rate after which they jump to 42%. To check out the tax rates, and tax credits you can claim, check out http://www.revenue.ie/budget/budget2006/income_06.htm#2

jgombos Jan 10th 2006 11:30 pm

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by crazydaisy
The income tax rates at 20% are pretty good until you reach the standard cut off rate after which they jump to 42%.

It seems anyone in IT will be above the cutoffs. Is the 42% applied only to revenue above the cutoff?

How many hours are in an workday, and how many paid workdays are in a year for contractors? There seems to be an incentive for taking a lengthy vacation after reaching the tax cutoff, and/or beginning work late in the year.

crazydaisy Jan 11th 2006 2:53 am

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by jgombos
It seems anyone in IT will be above the cutoffs. Is the 42% applied only to revenue above the cutoff?

How many hours are in an workday, and how many paid workdays are in a year for contractors? There seems to be an incentive for taking a lengthy vacation after reaching the tax cutoff, and/or beginning work late in the year.

Not too sure about the work hours or workdays - they probably vary from contract to contract. For instance hubby is currently on 12 hours shifts going from 2 days to 2 nights then 4 days off in Canada but that could be vastly different to another job doing similar work for another contractor. I guess the joy of contracting is that as you say you can decide on your own vacation schedule when work is completed. The 42% does apply to anything over and above the cutoff - anything below that would be assessed at the lower rate.

BlueScottyGirl Jan 15th 2006 12:54 pm

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by jgombos
In the U.S., contractors are much better off than directs. But I've heard that's pretty much specific to the U.S., and that IT contractors get screwed elsewhere - very little job security, no benefits, and less pay. I'm not sure how accurate that is, but I am thinking working direct is better in the EU.

Hi jgombos,

In Ireland, as in the rest of the EU there are many down sides to contracting, namely

No long term job security
No employment benefits, ie if you're off sick, you don't get paid, no employers contribution to your health insurance etc, exclusion from any other permanent employee benefits such as cheaper insurance premiums/mortgages and even tickets to the staff christmas party might not come your way as my husband discovered on more than one occassion.

On the up side, the rates aren't too bad at the moment :) definatly better that a permie, and that's taking everything else into consideration. You need to form a company (or go with an umberella company) if you wish to contract in Ireland, most of the agencies will insist. The upside to this is you can cut your tax bill with careful planning and a good accountant.

Standard of living is good even if the state is getting a bit of a reputation as "Rip off Ireland", it must be doing something right as many, many people chose to move here.....including me.

BigDavyG Jan 15th 2006 3:31 pm

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by jgombos
Thanks for the links. That's very encouraging! It seems mid-career contractors get around 3000 USD/week in Ireland, which is about 170% of the rate here in the US.

I'm not sure where you've gotten your figures from put I can assure you thta $3000 per week seems extremely wide of the mark.
I'm originally from Belfast and have a friend who is due to start work with accenture in Dublin next week - 34,000EUR per year will be his starting salary. He has 6 years experience in m/f programming and was recruited as a senior programmer. That's about 4 times less than the figures you quoted.

crazydaisy Jan 15th 2006 7:27 pm

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by BigDavyG
I'm not sure where you've gotten your figures from put I can assure you thta $3000 per week seems extremely wide of the mark.
I'm originally from Belfast and have a friend who is due to start work with accenture in Dublin next week - 34,000EUR per year will be his starting salary. He has 6 years experience in m/f programming and was recruited as a senior programmer. That's about 4 times less than the figures you quoted.

You're right it does seem a little over. For instance if a contractor can get 200 Euros a day then that comes to 1,000 Euros (approx. $1,200 in USD) and even at 300 a day only comes to 1,500 Euros (approx $1,800 USD) per week.

BigDavyG Jan 16th 2006 11:16 pm

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by crazydaisy
You're right it does seem a little over. For instance if a contractor can get 200 Euros a day then that comes to 1,000 Euros (approx. $1,200 in USD) and even at 300 a day only comes to 1,500 Euros (approx $1,800 USD) per week.

I reckon that even 200EUR would be good dough unless you were pretty specialised or very experienced.Always best to underestimate things like this if you're making a move - that way things won't suddenly go t*ts up when you get there.

jgombos Jan 16th 2006 11:51 pm

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by BigDavyG
I'm not sure where you've gotten your figures from put I can assure you thta $3000 per week seems extremely wide of the mark.

I went to the link CrazyDaisy posted, which was showing what I thought was 390-490 Irish pounds/day.. but it looks like its actually euros (the C with a dash through it). My knowledge of money notation is lacking. I went to exchangerate.com to convert it from Irish pounds to USD... Dangerous - I almost had my bags packed.

I should have recognized the euro symbol; but I do find it irritating that statistics reporting dollar amounts often omit the type of currency altogether, making the numbers pretty meaningless. ie. If I use the international salary calculator at www.homefair.com, what currency does the tool expect me to enter, and what currency is it returning?

Also, what meaning does the dollar sign "$" have? Does it necessarily mean USD, or is it simply implying money of no particular currency?

crazydaisy Jan 17th 2006 3:33 am

Re: Computer Support in West Ireland
 

Originally Posted by BigDavyG
I reckon that even 200EUR would be good dough unless you were pretty specialised or very experienced.Always best to underestimate things like this if you're making a move - that way things won't suddenly go t*ts up when you get there.

Absolutely - lower end is always good to budget for to start with, as it may take time to get established. That way if it turns out better than expected it's a nice surprise rather than the other way round!!


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