contributory parent visa

Old Jan 21st 2019, 7:33 pm
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Default contributory parent visa

My husband & I are looking to join our daughter & son in law on the gold coast in the next three years. I have set up an immi account & researched the relevant visa but would like to know if it is advisable to go through an agent or if this is something we can do online ourselves? my daughter did her own partner visa. The fees I have been quoted by one agent are approx. $4000 (£2200) which seem quite hefty. The other question I have is the assurance of support monies. Am I right in thinking these could be around £40 k & have to be available at the start of the visa process? look forward to any comments thanks
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Old Jan 21st 2019, 11:58 pm
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

OK I assume you have checked you are eligible (balance of family)and your sponsors have been settled for an appropriate length of time.

The upfront visa fees are $3855 for the first applicant and $1300 for the second, so $ 5155 for you both.

When the visa visa is ready to be granted (currently taking a few years!) you will be asked to undergo health and character checks, these will cost about £700 and pay the second vac charge, which is currently $43600 each. Yes it is a lot but that is because you will not have paid into the system and are entitled to full Medicare which as you get older could cost a lot.

In addition an assurance of support will be required which will eventually be returned if you haven’t claimed any benefits. This is $10000 for the first applicant and $4000 for the second so $14000 in total.

Note that the figures in dollars will cost you a different amount of pounds depending on the exchange rate and there are also card payment fees of around 1.5% plus any foreign exchange fees your bank might make. It makes sense to have an Australian bank account for bigger payments so you can do a same currency bank transfer with no fees.

Also so note that these fees can and do increase every year, usually on the first of July.

So in answer to to your question, no the AOS is only $14000 but the second vac charge will be $87200 and both will be required when the visa is ready to be granted. The upfront charge is $5155.

Last edited by rammygirl; Jan 22nd 2019 at 12:00 am.
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Old Feb 16th 2019, 11:13 pm
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Talking Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by rammygirl View Post
OK I assume you have checked you are eligible (balance of family)and your sponsors have been settled for an appropriate length of time.

The upfront visa fees are $3855 for the first applicant and $1300 for the second, so $ 5155 for you both.

When the visa visa is ready to be granted (currently taking a few years!) you will be asked to undergo health and character checks, these will cost about £700 and pay the second vac charge, which is currently $43600 each. Yes it is a lot but that is because you will not have paid into the system and are entitled to full Medicare which as you get older could cost a lot.

In addition an assurance of support will be required which will eventually be returned if you haven’t claimed any benefits. This is $10000 for the first applicant and $4000 for the second so $14000 in total.

Note that the figures in dollars will cost you a different amount of pounds depending on the exchange rate and there are also card payment fees of around 1.5% plus any foreign exchange fees your bank might make. It makes sense to have an Australian bank account for bigger payments so you can do a same currency bank transfer with no fees.

Also so note that these fees can and do increase every year, usually on the first of July.

So in answer to to your question, no the AOS is only $14000 but the second vac charge will be $87200 and both will be required when the visa is ready to be granted. The upfront charge is $5155.
Hey Rammygirl,
Apologies in advance for my dumb question as I really am clueless about this entire process & I pretty much need an idiots guide so I can help my parents.... if this visa is applied for onshore & the initial $5155 is paid, can my folks just live here and access Medicare in the meantime? And then just to clarify, the remaining costs for this visa will be required when the visa is ready to be granted?
Apologies again for my cluelessness..
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 1:06 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by artep View Post


Hey Rammygirl,
Apologies in advance for my dumb question as I really am clueless about this entire process & I pretty much need an idiots guide so I can help my parents.... if this visa is applied for onshore & the initial $5155 is paid, can my folks just live here and access Medicare in the meantime? And then just to clarify, the remaining costs for this visa will be required when the visa is ready to be granted?
Apologies again for my cluelessness..
From the Department of Human Services:
If you’ve applied directly for the permanent Contributory parent visa subclass 143 or 864 without holding the temporary Contributory parent visa first, you’re not eligible (for Medicare) until your permanent Contributory parent visa is granted. However, you may be able to get a Medicare card if you’re eligible under a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement.
https://www.humanservices.gov.au/ind...-can-get-it#a4
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 1:53 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by spouse of scouse View Post
From the Department of Human Services:
If you’ve applied directly for the permanent Contributory parent visa subclass 143 or 864 without holding the temporary Contributory parent visa first, you’re not eligible (for Medicare) until your permanent Contributory parent visa is granted. However, you may be able to get a Medicare card if you’re eligible under a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement.
https://www.humanservices.gov.au/ind...-can-get-it#a4
thanks for that...we’ll as they’re Poms they ought to be ok as far as Medicare goes then..so they should be able to apply directly for the permanent contributory parent visa then...
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 4:12 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by artep View Post


thanks for that...we’ll as they’re Poms they ought to be ok as far as Medicare goes then..so they should be able to apply directly for the permanent contributory parent visa then...
Bear in mind that reciprocal Medicare is for urgent medical treatment whichmeans that they still need private medical insurance for any elective treatment (non-emergency services include things like chemo or elective cardiac procedures, etc.).
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 5:44 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by Dorothy View Post
Bear in mind that reciprocal Medicare is for urgent medical treatment whichmeans that they still need private medical insurance for any elective treatment (non-emergency services include things like chemo or elective cardiac procedures, etc.).
And forget things like gal bladder removal and knee/hip replacements as well!

Much more sensible to wait in UK with its free prescriptions etc to be sure they actually pass the medicals when the time comes and don't have to return having already sold up. They can still take long holidays in Aus in the meantime.
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 5:46 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Oh ok, I’m guessing that applies when they’re in the permanent visa application process? When they come here for their 3 month holidays they are able to get Medicare cards & access it just as I do - they obviously don’t get a pensioner concession but they get everything else.
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 5:49 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Thanks for all your replies, I think I def need to consult an agent...whilst we did our own applications back in the day, not sure I want to attempt this one without an agent...can’t risk stuffing it up
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 6:25 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by artep View Post
Oh ok, I’m guessing that applies when they’re in the permanent visa application process? When they come here for their 3 month holidays they are able to get Medicare cards & access it just as I do - they obviously don’t get a pensioner concession but they get everything else.
Hi artep!!

Long time \\no speak!!!!
They are still only able to access it for emergency care, under the reciprocal scheme.
Its like the UK, some visitors may manage to get elective care because the right questions aren't asked, but they are't entitled to it, and shouldn't expect it. If they get Medicare cards while on holiday those will be reciprocal, and any care beyond emergencies will be billed back to the NHS, as they are still UK residents.
If they were here for years, waiting for a grant then technically they are no longer UK residents and not eligible for the NHS - most people who apply onshore and wait on bridging visas have private health insurance, at a huge cost (can be $10,000 a year according to friends)
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 6:26 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by artep View Post
Thanks for all your replies, I think I def need to consult an agent...whilst we did our own applications back in the day, not sure I want to attempt this one without an agent...can’t risk stuffing it up
Definitely. Too many variables, so get a good agent. My personal recommendation is George Lombard, who you may recall used to post here.
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 6:38 am
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

We did our own 864 application, you need to check carefully, one question about family was a bit ambiguous, but unless you have a complicated application it’s fairly straight forward. We are in a different situation to most applicants as we already live in Australia on the discontinued retirement visa, but please check the Medicare details if you apply for the parent visa on shore from a visitors visa whether or not you are eligible once the bridging visa kicks in after the visitor visa ends. I thought you were, but as others have said if eligible how limited it might be before gaining PR. Overseas Visitors Health insurance is not cheap and goes up every year. 15% increase this year!!! There is talk that it might take up to 5/6 years? to get this visa soon, so you have to weigh up the advantages against the disadvantages of seeing the time out in UK or Oz. It’s also I’ve heard getting harder and more expensive for a non resident to buy a property, which might apply to someone on a long term bridging visa. Again something else to check.
Hope this helps.
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 7:08 am
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Unhappy Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by Pollyana View Post
Hi artep!!

Long time \\no speak!!!!
They are still only able to access it for emergency care, under the reciprocal scheme.
Its like the UK, some visitors may manage to get elective care because the right questions aren't asked, but they are't entitled to it, and shouldn't expect it. If they get Medicare cards while on holiday those will be reciprocal, and any care beyond emergencies will be billed back to the NHS, as they are still UK residents.
If they were here for years, waiting for a grant then technically they are no longer UK residents and not eligible for the NHS - most people who apply onshore and wait on bridging visas have private health insurance, at a huge cost (can be $10,000 a year according to friends)
Hi Polly! It’s been a looong time hey, hope you’re doing ok?

Yeah I may well contact George as I don’t think I can even attempt this on my own esp as I’m working full time plus I just had my first of two knee surgeries. I’m not even sure if they can do this from a financial perspective so I have lots of questions I need to find the answer to before we even attempt an application
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 7:10 am
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Thumbs up Re: contributory parent visa

Originally Posted by tomar View Post
We did our own 864 application, you need to check carefully, one question about family was a bit ambiguous, but unless you have a complicated application it’s fairly straight forward. We are in a different situation to most applicants as we already live in Australia on the discontinued retirement visa, but please check the Medicare details if you apply for the parent visa on shore from a visitors visa whether or not you are eligible once the bridging visa kicks in after the visitor visa ends. I thought you were, but as others have said if eligible how limited it might be before gaining PR. Overseas Visitors Health insurance is not cheap and goes up every year. 15% increase this year!!! There is talk that it might take up to 5/6 years? to get this visa soon, so you have to weigh up the advantages against the disadvantages of seeing the time out in UK or Oz. It’s also I’ve heard getting harder and more expensive for a non resident to buy a property, which might apply to someone on a long term bridging visa. Again something else to check.
Hope this helps.
Thanks Tomar, there’s a lot to think about, sounds like you got your head around it ok tho
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Old Feb 17th 2019, 9:54 pm
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Default Re: contributory parent visa

Tomar is correct about buying a house. Until they are PR they will need FIRB (foreign investment review board) approval to buy. This used to be straightforward and free but now it costs around $6000 depending on the value of the property. They would also not be eligible for any stamp duty discounts and in some states non residents pay a higher rate.

There are are many things to consider with the plan you have now. How old are your parents? Have they looked at the financial aspects of the move fully and worked out how they will support themselves after all the expense of the visa etc.

not trying to put you off just ensuring that it is a fully informed decision and everyone is aware of the consequences.

They can get longer visit visas up to a year whilst waiting for offshore processing.
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