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What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

Old Aug 20th 2003, 5:09 pm
  #1  
Gz
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

I am a citizen of an eastern European country, we currently live in U.S.,
but would like to move to Toronto. In ~9 months we should hold U.S.
citizenship.

Should we apply for Canadian PR now, or after we are U.S. citizens ? I
wonder if the wait could be shorter, and maybe if we could get a different
treatment (e.g. no interview) ?

Thanks,

G.
 
Old Aug 20th 2003, 5:33 pm
  #2  
Andrew Miller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

No difference.

--

../..

Andrew Miller
Immigration Consultant
Vancouver, British Columbia
email: [email protected]
(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
________________________________


"GZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:3uY0b.161808$Oz4.43836@rwcrnsc54...
    > I am a citizen of an eastern European country, we currently live in U.S.,
    > but would like to move to Toronto. In ~9 months we should hold U.S.
    > citizenship.
    > Should we apply for Canadian PR now, or after we are U.S. citizens ? I
    > wonder if the wait could be shorter, and maybe if we could get a different
    > treatment (e.g. no interview) ?
    > Thanks,
    > G.
 
Old Aug 20th 2003, 10:55 pm
  #3  
Jaj
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

As Andrew says it makes no difference to a Canada PR application, but
it does mean you will no longer be at risk of losing your green cards
by moving outside the US.

However, depending on what country you are a citizen of currently, you
may lose that status when you naturalise as an American citizen. You
should check it out if it's important to you. Of course, if your home
country prohibits dual citizenship and you want to keep that
citizenship, you won't be able to become Canadian in future either.

Jeremy

    >On Thu, 21 Aug 2003 05:33:55 GMT, "Andrew Miller" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >No difference.
    >--
    >../..
    >Andrew Miller
    >Immigration Consultant
    >Vancouver, British Columbia
    >email: [email protected]
    >(delete REMOVE from the above address before sending email)
    >________________________________
    >"GZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:3uY0b.161808$Oz4.43836@rwcrnsc54...
    >> I am a citizen of an eastern European country, we currently live in U.S.,
    >> but would like to move to Toronto. In ~9 months we should hold U.S.
    >> citizenship.
    >> Should we apply for Canadian PR now, or after we are U.S. citizens ? I
    >> wonder if the wait could be shorter, and maybe if we could get a different
    >> treatment (e.g. no interview) ?
    >> Thanks,
    >> G.

This is not intended to be legal advice in any jurisdiction
 
Old Aug 21st 2003, 5:20 am
  #4  
Webcrawler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

There may be a couple of ways you can benefit by waiting until you get
your US citienship:

1. You can file through Buffalo without any issues.
You will be without any doubt an "in-jurisdiction" case.
In case an interview is required, you will not have any problems
travelling to the US.

2. By ~ 9 months, CIC's backlog from previous years should ease out
more.
Currently there are several applications that fall into the grey area
between the old rules and the new rules.
During the next 9 months, a lot of those will be finalised either way.

3. If you currently hold a US GC, by applying for a Canadian PR, you
are declaring an "intent" of abandoning your US permanent residency.
I don't know whether this can cause problems or not - why take a
chance.
Once you are a US citizen, there is no residency requirement and you
can apply for any other country's permanent residency without the fear
of losing your US citizenship.

HTH

    > "GZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:3uY0b.161808$Oz4.43836@rwcrnsc54...
    > > I am a citizen of an eastern European country, we currently live in U.S.,
    > > but would like to move to Toronto. In ~9 months we should hold U.S.
    > > citizenship.
    > >
    > > Should we apply for Canadian PR now, or after we are U.S. citizens ? I
    > > wonder if the wait could be shorter, and maybe if we could get a different
    > > treatment (e.g. no interview) ?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > G.
    > >
    > >
 
Old Aug 21st 2003, 5:39 pm
  #5  
Gz
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

Thanks all, thanks WC !

I haven't thought of #3 before, and losing the U.S. citizenship would be
very bad (of course). I'm not sure how the U.S. would learn about this lack
of loyalty, but as you say, why take chances. I really appreciate your
warning.

G.

"WebCrawler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > There may be a couple of ways you can benefit by waiting until you get
    > your US citienship:
    > 1. You can file through Buffalo without any issues.
    > You will be without any doubt an "in-jurisdiction" case.
    > In case an interview is required, you will not have any problems
    > travelling to the US.
    > 2. By ~ 9 months, CIC's backlog from previous years should ease out
    > more.
    > Currently there are several applications that fall into the grey area
    > between the old rules and the new rules.
    > During the next 9 months, a lot of those will be finalised either way.
    > 3. If you currently hold a US GC, by applying for a Canadian PR, you
    > are declaring an "intent" of abandoning your US permanent residency.
    > I don't know whether this can cause problems or not - why take a
    > chance.
    > Once you are a US citizen, there is no residency requirement and you
    > can apply for any other country's permanent residency without the fear
    > of losing your US citizenship.
    > HTH
    > > "GZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:3uY0b.161808$Oz4.43836@rwcrnsc54...
    > > > I am a citizen of an eastern European country, we currently live in
U.S.,
    > > > but would like to move to Toronto. In ~9 months we should hold U.S.
    > > > citizenship.
    > > >
    > > > Should we apply for Canadian PR now, or after we are U.S. citizens ?
I
    > > > wonder if the wait could be shorter, and maybe if we could get a
different
    > > > treatment (e.g. no interview) ?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > G.
    > > >
    > > >
 
Old Aug 22nd 2003, 6:51 am
  #6  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 182
Alfaris is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

Yes, do heed the warnings if U.S. status is important to you. Whenever a U.S. green card holder returns to U.S. from another country, the immigration officer has the right to doubt whether or not the green card holder's permanent place of residence is still within the United States. This is regardless of the length of your trip and regardless of whether or not you are in possession of a re-entry permit. If the officer is in doubt, he/she will initially attempt to harrass the green card holder into signing the immigration form I-407. If the green card holder signs this form, he/she will be voluntarily surrendering the green card and will be directed immediately to leave the United States. If the holder does not sign the form, he/she will be directed to an admissibility hearing, where a U.S. immigration judge will decide whether or not the green card holder has in fact abandoned his/her residence in the United States.

A Canadian stamp in your passport, stating that you have been admitted for permanent residence in Canada, will almost guarantee an admissibility hearing for you the next time you attempt to enter the United States. Then you will have the burden of explaining to the immigration judge, how is it that you applied for permanent residence in Canada and accepted it, even though you never wanted to abandon the United States.

Good luck,

Alfaris

Originally posted by Gz
Thanks all, thanks WC !

I haven't thought of #3 before, and losing the U.S. citizenship would be
very bad (of course). I'm not sure how the U.S. would learn about this lack
of loyalty, but as you say, why take chances. I really appreciate your
warning.

G.

"WebCrawler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > There may be a couple of ways you can benefit by waiting until you get
    > your US citienship:
    > 1. You can file through Buffalo without any issues.
    > You will be without any doubt an "in-jurisdiction" case.
    > In case an interview is required, you will not have any problems
    > travelling to the US.
    > 2. By ~ 9 months, CIC's backlog from previous years should ease out
    > more.
    > Currently there are several applications that fall into the grey area
    > between the old rules and the new rules.
    > During the next 9 months, a lot of those will be finalised either way.
    > 3. If you currently hold a US GC, by applying for a Canadian PR, you
    > are declaring an "intent" of abandoning your US permanent residency.
    > I don't know whether this can cause problems or not - why take a
    > chance.
    > Once you are a US citizen, there is no residency requirement and you
    > can apply for any other country's permanent residency without the fear
    > of losing your US citizenship.
    > HTH
    > > "GZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:3uY0b.161808$Oz4.43836@rwcrnsc54...
    > > > I am a citizen of an eastern European country, we currently live in
U.S.,
    > > > but would like to move to Toronto. In ~9 months we should hold U.S.
    > > > citizenship.
    > > >
    > > > Should we apply for Canadian PR now, or after we are U.S. citizens ?
I
    > > > wonder if the wait could be shorter, and maybe if we could get a
different
    > > > treatment (e.g. no interview) ?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > G.
    > > >
    > > >
Alfaris is offline  
Old Aug 22nd 2003, 7:12 am
  #7  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 182
Alfaris is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

On another note, do not assume that losing your U.S. status will be bad for you. Canada has many advantages over the United States and whether or not it will be better for you here depends on you personally. What is better for most people may be worse for you.

Consider also the burdens of carrying U.S. status. As a U.S. permanent resident, you are required to file a U.S. tax return no matter where in the world you live. Even though there is $70,000 USD tax exemption on foreign income, you are still required to file. As a U.S. permanent resident you are required to register with the Selective Service and you may be drafted into the U.S. Army against your will.

If you voluntarily give up your U.S. citizenship or if you voluntarily give up your green card after holding it for eight years or more, you may be subject to the U.S. Exit Tax. It will be upon you for ten years, and tax you severely on all your income. You will be subjected to it if the U.S. government suspects that you gave up you citizenship or green card in order to avoid taxation. It is your choice not to comply with this taxation if you intend never to return to the U.S. If you do not pay this tax and then you do visit the U.S., you may be charged with tax evasion and go to prison.

Canada does not have these brutal demands, and is more kind to its residents. You also receive health insurance from the government, and there are better tax credits for poor people. Canada can give you the peace of mind and body.

Good luck,

Alfaris


Originally posted by Gz
Thanks all, thanks WC !

I haven't thought of #3 before, and losing the U.S. citizenship would be
very bad (of course). I'm not sure how the U.S. would learn about this lack
of loyalty, but as you say, why take chances. I really appreciate your
warning.

G.

"WebCrawler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > There may be a couple of ways you can benefit by waiting until you get
    > your US citienship:
    > 1. You can file through Buffalo without any issues.
    > You will be without any doubt an "in-jurisdiction" case.
    > In case an interview is required, you will not have any problems
    > travelling to the US.
    > 2. By ~ 9 months, CIC's backlog from previous years should ease out
    > more.
    > Currently there are several applications that fall into the grey area
    > between the old rules and the new rules.
    > During the next 9 months, a lot of those will be finalised either way.
    > 3. If you currently hold a US GC, by applying for a Canadian PR, you
    > are declaring an "intent" of abandoning your US permanent residency.
    > I don't know whether this can cause problems or not - why take a
    > chance.
    > Once you are a US citizen, there is no residency requirement and you
    > can apply for any other country's permanent residency without the fear
    > of losing your US citizenship.
    > HTH
    > > "GZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:3uY0b.161808$Oz4.43836@rwcrnsc54...
    > > > I am a citizen of an eastern European country, we currently live in
U.S.,
    > > > but would like to move to Toronto. In ~9 months we should hold U.S.
    > > > citizenship.
    > > >
    > > > Should we apply for Canadian PR now, or after we are U.S. citizens ?
I
    > > > wonder if the wait could be shorter, and maybe if we could get a
different
    > > > treatment (e.g. no interview) ?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > G.
    > > >
    > > >
Alfaris is offline  
Old Aug 22nd 2003, 7:12 pm
  #8  
Gz
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What diff. my citizenship makes in PR ?

Alfaris,

I never knew that ! But I guess that's typical of here, the exit clauses
and all. Still, I've no plans to abandon the U.S. citizenship.

But so if it's going to take 2 years for me to get the Canadian PR, in 9
months I'll already hold the U.S. citizenship, and INS should not be able to
know that. Sounds like a time saver, unless Canada would somehow inform
them, which would be a really bad surprise.

Thanks for your feedback, again. I'll be careful.

G.


"Alfaris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
    > On another note, do not assume that losing your U.S. status will be bad
    > for you. Canada has many advantages over the United States and whether
    > or not it will be better for you here depends on you personally. What is
    > better for most people may be worse for you.
    > Consider also the burdens of carrying U.S. status. As a U.S. permanent
    > resident, you are required to file a U.S. tax return no matter where in
    > the world you live. Even though there is $70,000 USD tax exemption on
    > foreign income, you are still required to file. As a U.S. permanent
    > resident you are required to register with the Selective Service and you
    > may be drafted into the U.S. Army against your will.
    > If you voluntarily give up your U.S. citizenship or if you voluntarily
    > give up your green card after holding it for eight years or more, you
    > may be subject to the U.S. Exit Tax. It will be upon you for ten years,
    > and tax you severely on all your income. You will be subjected to it if
    > the U.S. government suspects that you gave up you citizenship or green
    > card in order to avoid taxation. It is your choice not to comply with
    > this taxation if you intend never to return to the U.S. If you do not
    > pay this tax and then you do visit the U.S., you may be charged with tax
    > evasion and go to prison.
    > Canada does not have these brutal demands, and is more kind to its
    > residents. You also receive health insurance from the government, and
    > there are better tax credits for poor people. Canada can give you the
    > peace of mind and body.
    > Good luck,
    > Alfaris
    > Originally posted by Gz
    > > Thanks all, thanks WC !
    > >
    > > I haven't thought of #3 before, and losing the U.S. citizenship
    > > would be
    > > very bad (of course). I'm not sure how the U.S. would learn about
    > > this lack
    > > of loyalty, but as you say, why take chances. I really
    > > appreciate your
    > > warning.
    > >
    > > G.
    > >
    > > "WebCrawler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]"]news:b24ca-
    > > [email protected][/url]...
    > > > There may be a couple of ways you can benefit by waiting until
    > > you get
    > > > your US citienship:
    > > > 1. You can file through Buffalo without any issues.
    > > > You will be without any doubt an "in-jurisdiction" case.
    > > > In case an interview is required, you will not have any
    > > problems
    > > > travelling to the US.
    > > > 2. By ~ 9 months, CIC's backlog from previous years should ease
    > > out
    > > > more.
    > > > Currently there are several applications that fall into the grey
    > > area
    > > > between the old rules and the new rules.
    > > > During the next 9 months, a lot of those will be finalised
    > > either way.
    > > > 3. If you currently hold a US GC, by applying for a Canadian PR,
    > > you
    > > > are declaring an "intent" of abandoning your US permanent
    > > residency.
    > > > I don't know whether this can cause problems or not - why take
    > > a
    > > > chance.
    > > > Once you are a US citizen, there is no residency requirement and
    > > you
    > > > can apply for any other country's permanent residency without
    > > the fear
    > > > of losing your US citizenship.
    > > > HTH
    > > > > "GZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:3uY0b.161808$Oz4.43836@rwcrnsc54"]news:3uY0b.16180-
    > > 8$Oz4.43836@rwcrnsc54[/url]...
    > > > > > I am a citizen of an eastern European country, we currently
    > > live in
    > > U.S.,
    > > > > > but would like to move to Toronto. In ~9 months we should
    > > hold U.S.
    > > > > > citizenship.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Should we apply for Canadian PR now, or after we are U.S.
    > > citizens ?
    > > I
    > > > > > wonder if the wait could be shorter, and maybe if we could
    > > get a
    > > different
    > > > > > treatment (e.g. no interview) ?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Thanks,
    > > > > >
    > > > > > G.
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > --
    > Posted via http://britishexpats.com
 
Old Aug 28th 2003, 6:08 am
  #9  
Forum Regular
 
Joined: Aug 2003
Location: los angeles
Posts: 31
vlad is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

I am in the same situation , I am US citizen since 2000, and my wife will be applying in july 2004, according to what you just said
we should wait till 2005 or whenever my wife get Naturalized ?
Is there any web link that explains it better ......
vlad is offline  

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